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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999
The San Fernando Valley economy, devastated in the early 1990s by recession and earthquake, has been experiencing a steady recovery over the past few years. Lately it's starting to look like an outright boom--good news for Valley workers this Labor Day weekend. The latest promising sign is the announcement last week that the Walt Disney Co.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001
Beginning today, The Times expands its state, regional and local news coverage in a newly designed California section. Among the changes on Sundays: Peter H. King's "On California" column will appear regularly on B1. A new weekly feature, "Good Turns," highlighting philanthropic activities in our communities, debuts on B2. Daily lottery numbers will appear on B3. Valley Perspective pages no longer appear.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999
Imagine starting classes at Cal State Northridge last week and, after enduring all those long lines and getting lost a few times, actually having someplace to go afterward, to sit down, relax, have a tall iced drink and trade registration horror stories with fellow students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2001
With the recent reelection of Julie Korenstein to the Los Angeles Board of Education, I hope that she makes school safety one of her top issues. I am a student in her district and I sometimes worry that when a student explodes in class and starts yelling at the teacher, the student may also pull out a gun and start shooting. I hope that all members of the school board will work to diminish this fear in the children of the Los Angeles Unified School District. Of all the things that children worry about, their safety at school should not be one of them.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | NANCY ARMOUR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Garland Dempsey doesn't remember meeting Mike Smollen or Christian Ganz. Ditto for Dan Capuano and Dave Spivak. But when the caddie saw the four again last Wednesday, he greeted them as if they were the most important people in his life. In a way, they are. "It's really hard to begin to tell you how happy I am to be here," said Dempsey, who was revived by the four Lemont paramedic-firefighters on July 3, 1999, after he collapsed and his heart stopped on the 15th hole at the Western Open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996
We have a few thoughts on the Tuesday vote in the San Fernando Valley and its environs. First, how about that show of support for Republican Pat Buchanan? Well, it won't matter a whit come November. But we do think that the chances have increased for a visit here from Bob Dole between now and the election. In the Congress, we might just have two hard-fought races in the 24th and 27th districts. We can only hope that the light turnout Tuesday is not a sign of things to come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1995
At this time last year, in this space, we noted the San Fernando Valley's high and low points of 1994. It was just too easy, especially in a year in which the Glendale City Council briefly (and outrageously) decided to end its pigeon problem by hooking the birds up to automobile tailpipes and gassing them. We have decided to increase the degree of difficulty this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996 | HILMA COHN, Hilma Cohn is a North Hollywood writer
The day I perused a filthy, trash-strewn alley with anticipation, I suddenly realized just how much had changed. The sight of trash scavengers in my neighborhood, searching for bottles and cans, had always bothered me. It never occurred to me--middle-aged, middle-class, middle management--that one day I would become one of "them." Five years ago, I was found to have diabetes. To control my blood sugar, I began to walk every day for 30 minutes. At my pace, that's 800 miles a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1995 | CHARLES DUSHECK, Charles Dusheck is a retired aerospace executive
Several score and a few decades ago our forefathers had a major problem: how to communicate with other ships at sea, and how to do business with other nationalities? World travel had been going on for years, and they found with the hundreds of countries and hundreds of languages there had to be some type of common ground so they might communicate with each other. After the usual committees and conferences, they decided upon English as the international language of commerce. When the airplane came into being, the same decision was made: English was the language of the air. In all instances, a common language was required to trade, to communicate during disasters and to understand each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994
Several highly publicized carjackings in the San Fernando Valley last year led to all manner of ambulance-chasing sales pitches for devices that would keep crooks at bay. For the most part, these items offered little more than a costly and false sense of security. They might have even added to the dangers faced by their owners. How? Consider the supposedly lifelike mannequin who is assigned to ride next to you to deter crime. These might tend to make their owners less vigilant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
On April 10, will we be buying the best candidate or the best pitch? Could we please keep the act of voting based, as it should be, on the person, platform and principles? Campaigns have become merely battles of advertising prowess. Even last year's presidential debates were more akin to infomercials than a true discussion of issues. All voters should get out there and cast their ballots for the candidate that best represents their views. Let's leave the judging of advertising to the CLEO Awards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
In the stack of literature I've received from several candidates running for City Council in District 5, there are promises to trim trees, fill potholes, relieve traffic congestion and extend library hours. I'd like to hear from the candidate who has a plan to contain or reduce population growth in areas with schools that are grievously overcrowded--which is just about everywhere. Why is it that apartment buildings, condos, and housing developments have been permitted to proliferate in our city without regard to whether or not children who move into them will have a seat in a school that isn't already filled to double or triple its intended capacity?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
Craig Lennon Kysar asserts that history and current events show a "free market economy do not lead to people getting what they need, but instead lead to rich people getting what they want" (Letters to the Valley Edition, April 1). If Kysar's assertion is correct then how is it that American entrepreneurs, starting with Henry Ford, have been so successful in being able to mass produce expensive items such as cars, refrigerators, television sets, computers and so on, at prices most Americans can afford?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
San Fernando Valley residents have heard a lot of valid concerns about the "how" to split from the city of Los Angeles. But where is the "why" secession should occur? As The Times' recent editorial asked ("Secession and Solomon, March 29), "What would the Valley gain from a municipal divorce?" Were we lured into assuming we have adopted a separatist mentality just because we voted to explore the hows with the Local Agency Formation Commission? Los Angeles is one of a precious few cities governed under a charter granted by the state of California and is not under the thumb of the state Legislature like the others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
Re "UC Faculty Chief Backs Dropping SAT," Feb. 18, and "SAT Tests," Letters to the Valley Edition, March 25. "Finally, someone of authority is willing to criticize our reliance on SAT scores as the main determinate in college admission." I question [this] decision. He offers no alternative; what will he use in its place? What will be the test for the future standard for admitting students to higher education (UCs)? The SATs assure standardization of learning, if you want to make sure a high school student from West L.A will be as capable of handling higher education as a student from another area of California.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | MIKE HAUBRICH
Foothill's Courtney Fossatti, coming off a perfect game March 24 against Rosary, pitched a one-hitter Saturday, striking out 11 and walking none as the host Knights beat Marina, 7-1, in a pool-play game at the Foothill tournament. "Courtney had another great game," Foothill Coach Joe Gonzalez said. "She's got some extra pitches working for her and has been keeping her pitch counts low." Fossatti set the tone early, retiring the Vikings in order in the first three innings before Marina (6-4)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001
It's not an outage, it's an outrage! ROLLIE HART FREEDMAN Tarzana
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