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Valley Secedes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999
One has to question the truth of the information the Valley VOTE people are giving the public. For example, in his Jan. 17 opinion article, VOTE President Jeff Brain makes the statement that a Feb. 5, 1998, letter from City Atty. James Hahn to Mayor Richard Riordan provides assurance that water rates will not rise if the Valley secedes ("Attack on VOTE Targets All Study Sponsors"). The fact of the matter is that the city charges a differential rate to the few small communities it serves in the Owens Valley, and it could also do the same to the San Fernando Valley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 14, 2002
Re "Scouting a Main Street for a Valley City," Oct. 7: What use does the Valley's vast low- income population have for cafes and boutiques? For the concentration of working poor in the northeast Valley, Ventura Boulevard might as well be downtown Los Angeles. Likewise, the solidly middle-class homeowners "north of Rinaldi" might not match their upscale "south of the boulevard" contemporaries in income, but I'm sure there are cafes and boutiques that don't require them to face traffic on the 405. The lovely communities of Chatsworth, West Hills and Tujunga probably don't consider Ventura their lifeline either.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999
Re "Secessionists Oppose Bond Measure for Police, Fire," April 9. Because of the confrontational attitude of Jeff Brain and the arrogant attitude of Richard Close and some of their followers, I will do the opposite of everything these upstarts tell people in the San Fernando Valley to do. Believe me, if this Valley secedes, it will take a miracle for it to be successful. DOREEN SOLOMON, Woodland Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001
Re "Secession Will Hurt Poor Most, Panel Told," May 18: I agree with Deputy Mayor Bill Violante's summation before a panel of religious and civic leaders that the proposal to break the San Fernando Valley away from Los Angeles will hurt all residents, especially the poor. It is highly probable that a seceded Valley will pay 30% higher water rates due to ordinance 170435, providing for a surcharge on water service outside of the city of Los Angeles. The city charter gives the city the legal right to increase electricity rates for customers outside of the city, although traditionally it has not done so. Residents in a seceded Valley will probably pay more for police and fire protection and other services, not to mention the annual $68-million alimony payment to the city of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001
Re "Secession Will Hurt Poor Most, Panel Told," May 18: I agree with Deputy Mayor Bill Violante's summation before a panel of religious and civic leaders that the proposal to break the San Fernando Valley away from Los Angeles will hurt all residents, especially the poor. It is highly probable that a seceded Valley will pay 30% higher water rates due to ordinance 170435, providing for a surcharge on water service outside of the city of Los Angeles. The city charter gives the city the legal right to increase electricity rates for customers outside of the city, although traditionally it has not done so. Residents in a seceded Valley will probably pay more for police and fire protection and other services, not to mention the annual $68-million alimony payment to the city of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999
Re the editorial "An Ax Over Los Angeles," March 17. "Ax, sledgehammer, destroy, smashing, mercenaries" . . . your beyond-the-pale terminology to describe Valley VOTE's quest for Valley independence is both unprofessional and unforgivable. The Valley has grown up. The hyper-control and lack of privileges bestowed by the downtown powers-that-be must now acquiesce to this young adult city ready to leave the nest. Our fledging city of 1.6 million would include people of all races, creeds, nationalities and economic statuses.
OPINION
October 14, 2002
Re "Scouting a Main Street for a Valley City," Oct. 7: What use does the Valley's vast low- income population have for cafes and boutiques? For the concentration of working poor in the northeast Valley, Ventura Boulevard might as well be downtown Los Angeles. Likewise, the solidly middle-class homeowners "north of Rinaldi" might not match their upscale "south of the boulevard" contemporaries in income, but I'm sure there are cafes and boutiques that don't require them to face traffic on the 405. The lovely communities of Chatsworth, West Hills and Tujunga probably don't consider Ventura their lifeline either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Assembly approved a bill Friday that would provide for at least 14 city council members and an elected mayor for the San Fernando Valley if it secedes from Los Angeles. Coming just two weeks after its approval by the state Senate, the legislation by Assembly Speaker Bob Hertzberg (D-Sherman Oaks) now goes to the governor, who has not said whether he will sign it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1999 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though opposed to San Fernando Valley secession efforts, a group of Latino political activists met Wednesday to discuss ways to safeguard Latino clout should the Valley be split into a separate city or school district. At the meeting, the Valley chapter of the Mexican American Political Assn. discussed creating two Valley cities--and two Valley school districts--should the breakup become inevitable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1996 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arm-wrestled into Los Angeles, dwelling in resentful isolation from the bureaucrats on the other side of the hill, the 256-square-mile bowl of suburban angst that is the San Fernando Valley has never been a particularly happy resident of the city. A thirst for William Mulholland's water in 1915 brought the Valley into the city. And through successive battles over busing, apportionment and taxation, many have never stopped regretting that decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Assembly approved a bill Friday that would provide for at least 14 city council members and an elected mayor for the San Fernando Valley if it secedes from Los Angeles. Coming just two weeks after its approval by the state Senate, the legislation by Assembly Speaker Bob Hertzberg (D-Sherman Oaks) now goes to the governor, who has not said whether he will sign it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new San Fernando Valley city severed from Los Angeles would get at least 12 City Council members and a mayor elected directly by the voters under a bill approved Wednesday by a state Senate committee. The measure would set up council districts with no more than 100,000 residents--less than half the size of the current districts in Los Angeles--to achieve a key goal of secession: greater local control over government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1999 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though opposed to San Fernando Valley secession efforts, a group of Latino political activists met Wednesday to discuss ways to safeguard Latino clout should the Valley be split into a separate city or school district. At the meeting, the Valley chapter of the Mexican American Political Assn. discussed creating two Valley cities--and two Valley school districts--should the breakup become inevitable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999
Re "Secessionists Oppose Bond Measure for Police, Fire," April 9. Because of the confrontational attitude of Jeff Brain and the arrogant attitude of Richard Close and some of their followers, I will do the opposite of everything these upstarts tell people in the San Fernando Valley to do. Believe me, if this Valley secedes, it will take a miracle for it to be successful. DOREEN SOLOMON, Woodland Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1999 | EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON, Earl Ofari Hutchinson is the author of "The Crisis in Black and Black" (Middle Passage Press, 1998). E-mail: ehutchi344@aol.com
While polls show that a majority of Valley voters say they want to break away from Los Angeles, many Latinos and most African Americans don't think it's such a hot idea. It's not hard to figure out why. L.A. is already a nonwhite majority city, but in the Valley, whites are still in the majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999
Re the editorial "An Ax Over Los Angeles," March 17. "Ax, sledgehammer, destroy, smashing, mercenaries" . . . your beyond-the-pale terminology to describe Valley VOTE's quest for Valley independence is both unprofessional and unforgivable. The Valley has grown up. The hyper-control and lack of privileges bestowed by the downtown powers-that-be must now acquiesce to this young adult city ready to leave the nest. Our fledging city of 1.6 million would include people of all races, creeds, nationalities and economic statuses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996 | ED BOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although the San Fernando Valley began as a collection of independent small towns, by the 1920s and 1930s most of those communities chose to join the city of Los Angeles to share resources, chiefly water. While the idea of separating from the rest of the city over the hill is still on the minds of many, it is little more than wishful thinking because of a state law that prohibits secession movements when the city government objects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new San Fernando Valley city severed from Los Angeles would get at least 12 City Council members and a mayor elected directly by the voters under a bill approved Wednesday by a state Senate committee. The measure would set up council districts with no more than 100,000 residents--less than half the size of the current districts in Los Angeles--to achieve a key goal of secession: greater local control over government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999
One has to question the truth of the information the Valley VOTE people are giving the public. For example, in his Jan. 17 opinion article, VOTE President Jeff Brain makes the statement that a Feb. 5, 1998, letter from City Atty. James Hahn to Mayor Richard Riordan provides assurance that water rates will not rise if the Valley secedes ("Attack on VOTE Targets All Study Sponsors"). The fact of the matter is that the city charges a differential rate to the few small communities it serves in the Owens Valley, and it could also do the same to the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1997 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an intense day of lobbying and with no votes to spare, the bill that would pave the way for San Fernando Valley secession cleared its last committee hurdle Tuesday and moved to the state Senate floor for consideration. The measure--which removes the veto power of city councils over secession efforts--could be voted on as early as Friday. But it is more likely the bill will be taken up next week, giving its authors time to line up support.
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