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Valley Torah High School

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS
The City Council has approved a two-story office building conversion that will enable Valley Torah High School to expand. The project will move the male students to the new facility at 12517 Chandler Blvd., less than two miles from their current location on Riverside Drive. The girls, who are attending classes in a rented building, will move to the Riverside site. Officials expect the work to be finished around next February. Valley Torah High School offers both secular and religious studies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS
The City Council has approved a two-story office building conversion that will enable Valley Torah High School to expand. The project will move the male students to the new facility at 12517 Chandler Blvd., less than two miles from their current location on Riverside Drive. The girls, who are attending classes in a rented building, will move to the Riverside site. Officials expect the work to be finished around next February. Valley Torah High School offers both secular and religious studies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | AMY PYLE
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday asked the county Human Relations Commission to join in the investigation of why anti-Semitic graffiti was scrawled on walls at a North Hollywood high school this month. Acting on a request by Supervisor Mike Antonovich, the board asked the commission to offer its assistance in the investigation of the hate crime, which occurred March 6 at Valley Torah High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
The students and officials of Valley Torah High School in North Hollywood did not mind getting a little wet Sunday. That's because a new Sefer Torah, a handwritten scroll containing the first five books of Hebrew scriptures, was being delivered to their school. A crowd of 150 students, parents and members of the local Jewish community gathered at the rain-soaked corner of Ben Avenue and Huston Street to await the arrival of the new Torah, donated by the Istrin family of North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
The students and officials of Valley Torah High School in North Hollywood did not mind getting a little wet Sunday. That's because a new Sefer Torah, a handwritten scroll containing the first five books of Hebrew scriptures, was being delivered to their school. A crowd of 150 students, parents and members of the local Jewish community gathered at the rain-soaked corner of Ben Avenue and Huston Street to await the arrival of the new Torah, donated by the Istrin family of North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1997 | TOM BECKER
When Dr. Robert and Lilli Kahn-Rose were invited to dinner with a rabbi from their son's school, they could think only one thing--the kid was in big trouble. Instead, Rabbi Aryeh Striks delivered good news--the Kahn-Roses had been selected to receive one of the school's highest awards for dedicated service to the Jewish community. "You could imagine our surprise," said Robert Kahn-Rose. "Here we thought our child was in trouble, so much so that our rabbi had to invite us to dinner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Right after church services ended Sunday morning, Terry Smith raced down to North Hollywood from Westlake Village, traded his Sunday finery for a T-shirt and jeans, and put aside his Bible for a paintbrush--to help clean up a Jewish high school hit by anti-Semitic graffiti. "I just paid somebody to paint my house last week," the 42-year-old engineer said as he swabbed off-white paint onto storage cabinets. "This is a different motivation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1995 | LOUIS GORDON, Louis Gordon practices law in Encino and is a contributing editor to the Jewish Spectator
"Danny and I probably would never have met . . . had it not been for the desire . . . in the Jewish parochial schools to show the Gentile world that yeshiva students were as physically fit, despite their long hours of study, as any other American student."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intruders broke into a small private Jewish high school in North Hollywood sometime Friday night or early Saturday and spray-painted swastikas and Ku Klux Klan symbols on walls and furniture. Police said Saturday night that they are investigating the vandalism as a hate crime. "It's a horrible, frightening thing," said Rabbi Avrohom Stulberger, principal of the 200-student Valley Torah High School. "I cannot believe what these animals have done."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1997 | TOM BECKER
When Dr. Robert and Lilli Kahn-Rose were invited to dinner with a rabbi from their son's school, they could think only one thing--the kid was in big trouble. Instead, Rabbi Aryeh Striks delivered good news--the Kahn-Roses had been selected to receive one of the school's highest awards for dedicated service to the Jewish community. "You could imagine our surprise," said Robert Kahn-Rose. "Here we thought our child was in trouble, so much so that our rabbi had to invite us to dinner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1995 | LOUIS GORDON, Louis Gordon practices law in Encino and is a contributing editor to the Jewish Spectator
"Danny and I probably would never have met . . . had it not been for the desire . . . in the Jewish parochial schools to show the Gentile world that yeshiva students were as physically fit, despite their long hours of study, as any other American student."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to end the controversy surrounding an Orthodox Jewish high school basketball team's decision to wear yarmulkes during games, a California Interscholastic Federation official said he will ask for rules clarifications at state and national levels.
SPORTS
January 26, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to end controversy and confusion surrounding the yarmulkes worn by an Orthodox Jewish high school basketball team, Dean Crowley, commissioner of the Southern Section, said he will ask for rules clarifications at state and national levels. Crowley said rules pertaining to religious headwear need to be more fully detailed to prevent a repeat of several recent incidents in which members of the Valley Torah basketball team were harassed by officials for wearing yarmulkes during games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1995 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite official permission to observe an age-old religious practice, the basketball team of an Orthodox Jewish high school in North Hollywood has been criticized by referees and harassed by players and spectators for wearing yarmulkes during games. One referee delayed a game involving Valley Torah High School more than half an hour, refusing to allow the school's players to wear the religious skullcaps during play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The smell of fresh paint was in the air at Valley Torah High School on Monday and walls that once bore marks of hate are now a glistening white. But only days after vandals defaced the North Hollywood school with swastikas, Ku Klux Klan symbols and profanity, students and administrators are grappling with scars that will not soon be wiped away. "It's left an indelible mark that will stay for a long time," said David Solomon, 17, president of the school's student council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1995 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite official permission to observe an age-old religious practice, the basketball team of an Orthodox Jewish high school in North Hollywood has been criticized by referees and harassed by players and spectators for wearing yarmulkes during games. One referee delayed a game involving Valley Torah High School more than half an hour, refusing to allow the school's players to wear the religious skullcaps during play.
SPORTS
February 20, 1993 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES PREP SPORTS EDITOR
Matt Meisels needed an outlet from the 10-hour days he spent in class at Valley Torah High in North Hollywood. One of his few options was to go out for the school's basketball team, which scheduled practices and games around homework and religious commitments. Even though Meisels said the team was lucky to practice once a week and play a dozen games a season, he claims he would not have been able to make it though two years at the school without basketball.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | AMY PYLE
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday asked the county Human Relations Commission to join in the investigation of why anti-Semitic graffiti was scrawled on walls at a North Hollywood high school this month. Acting on a request by Supervisor Mike Antonovich, the board asked the commission to offer its assistance in the investigation of the hate crime, which occurred March 6 at Valley Torah High School.
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