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Value Added Tax United States

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NEWS
April 21, 1993 | EDWIN CHEN and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Congress is unlikely to approve a possible national sales tax to finance health care reform, House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) said Tuesday, adding his voice to growing sentiment on Capitol Hill against such a new levy. Foley made his unusually blunt--and negative--remarks about a national sales tax, also known as a value-added tax, as Congress returned from its Easter recess.
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NEWS
April 21, 1993 | EDWIN CHEN and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Congress is unlikely to approve a possible national sales tax to finance health care reform, House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) said Tuesday, adding his voice to growing sentiment on Capitol Hill against such a new levy. Foley made his unusually blunt--and negative--remarks about a national sales tax, also known as a value-added tax, as Congress returned from its Easter recess.
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NEWS
April 15, 1993 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anxious to find new money to pay for sweeping health care reforms, the White House is taking another look at a national value-added tax, a potentially controversial levy that President Clinton appeared to have ruled out in February, Administration officials said Wednesday. The Administration is drawn to the idea by its simplicity and its potential for helping pay the enormous sums needed to guarantee health coverage for all Americans.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The crushing cost of health care has prompted the Clinton Administration to revive consideration of a controversial tax plan to finance a sweeping program of reform. Alice Rivlin, deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget, this week called the value-added tax--better known as VAT--"a possible candidate" for financing health care reform, even though President Clinton earlier had denied that a VAT was in the offing.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The crushing cost of health care has prompted the Clinton Administration to revive consideration of a controversial tax plan to finance a sweeping program of reform. Alice Rivlin, deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget, this week called the value-added tax--better known as VAT--"a possible candidate" for financing health care reform, even though President Clinton earlier had denied that a VAT was in the offing.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anxious to find new money to pay for sweeping health care reforms, the White House is taking another look at a national value-added tax, a potentially controversial levy that President Clinton appeared to have ruled out in February, Administration officials said Wednesday. The Administration is drawn to the idea by its simplicity and its potential for helping pay the enormous sums needed to guarantee health coverage for all Americans.
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