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Values Voter Summit

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NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Texas Gov. Rick Perry picked up a key endorsement Friday as he delivered his pitch for the Republican presidential nomination at a gathering of social conservatives.  Robert Jeffress, senior pastor of the First Baptist Church in Dallas, called Perry “a proven leader” who embodies the three attributes that matter to social conservatives: a “genuine commitment to biblical values,” competency to govern, and electability. “Do we want a candidate who is skilled in rhetoric or one who is skilled in leadership?
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NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- In remarks to a prominent gathering of religious conservatives, Mitt Romney vowed to be a president who shared their “commitment to conservative principles,” and said a strong economy was rooted in “strong communities and strong families.”   Romney addressed the annual Values Voter Summit in Washington via a recorded video message, surprising attendees who had not expected to hear from the Republican nominee. His running mate, Paul D. Ryan had spoken to the gathering just hours earlier before heading to a campaign stop in battleground Virginia.
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NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- In remarks to a prominent gathering of religious conservatives, Mitt Romney vowed to be a president who shared their “commitment to conservative principles,” and said a strong economy was rooted in “strong communities and strong families.”   Romney addressed the annual Values Voter Summit in Washington via a recorded video message, surprising attendees who had not expected to hear from the Republican nominee. His running mate, Paul D. Ryan had spoken to the gathering just hours earlier before heading to a campaign stop in battleground Virginia.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
More than a week after the issue of Mitt Romney's faith became an open conversation in the Republican race for president, Rick Perry said the pastor who called Mormonism a cult simply "expressed an opinion," one that he did not agree with. Dallas pastor Robert Jeffress endorsed Perry and introduced the Texas governor at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, calling him "a true conservative" and "a genuine follower of Jesus Christ. " Speaking later with reporters, Jeffress said he agreed with the belief widely held among evangelicals that Mormonism was a cult, and that in a contest between Perry and Romney, "we ought to prefer a born-again follower of Christ.
OPINION
September 21, 2010
A popular view of the "tea party" movement is that it's concerned primarily with a crushing national debt and a federal government that has exceeded its narrow constitutional mandate. After a visit over the weekend to the 2010 Values Voter Summit in Washington, I'm not so sure. The summit, sponsored by the legislative action arm of the Family Research Council, is a combination rally, revival meeting, political convention and bazaar. This year you could listen to potential Republican presidential candidates including Rep. Mike Pence of Indiana, the dark-horse winner of a straw poll.
NEWS
September 16, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Christine O'Donnell's upset win in the Delaware Republican Senate primary has brought with it a major infusion of cash and now a featured role at this weekend's Values Voter Summit in Washington. FRC Action, which sponsors the annual gathering of social conservatives, announced the addition of O'Donnell to their schedule Thursday. It marks O'Donnell's first major public event since her stunning victory over Rep. Mike Castle in Tuesday's election. Even as some Republicans have expressed doubts about her electability, O'Donnell has been embraced by many conservative activists in the days since her victory.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint on Friday made no apologies for pushing to upend the establishment in Republican primaries across the country and praised the class of "tea party" candidates he helped catapult into the spotlight. "I've been working for that past year to stir up some vigorous primaries between establishment Republicans and Republicans who stand up for those principles of freedom," DeMint told a group of socially conservative activists gathered in Washington.
OPINION
October 11, 2011 | Jonah Goldberg
Robert Jeffress introduced Texas Gov. Rick Perry at the Values Voter Summit on Friday. He started a great big hullabaloo by asking, "Do we want a candidate who is a good, moral person, or one who is a born-again follower of the Lord Jesus Christ?" Before we go on, let me just say, I'd probably go with curtain No. 1. Don't get me wrong — I've got no problem with a born-again Christian being my president, my pilot or my chiropodist. But saying someone is a born-again Christian, for me at least, is not inherently synonymous with being a "good, moral person," never mind being transparently preferable to one. In other words, I might vote for a born-again Christian on the assumption that his professed faith makes it more likely he's a good person.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Indiana Rep. Mike Pence was the top choice for a 2012 presidential candidate among conservative activists who attended this weekend's Values Voter Summit in Washington, edging a field of more well-known Republican figures in an early test of grass-roots support. Pence, chairman of the House Republican Conference, received 24% of the vote, edging the winner of the 2009 straw poll, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who received 22%. Each addressed the gathering on Friday, as did third-place finisher Mitt Romney, who won 13% of the vote.
NEWS
September 18, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Indiana Rep. Mike Pence was the top choice for president among conservative activists who attended this weekend's Values Voter Summit in Washington, edging out a field of more well-known Republican figures in an early test of grass-roots support. Pence, chair of the House Republican conference, received 24% of the vote, edging the winner of the 2009 straw poll, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who received 22%. Each addressed the gathering on Friday, as did third-place finisher Mitt Romney, who won 13% of the vote.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Mitt Romney called on Rick Perry to disavow remarks from a pastor who endorsed his candidacy linking Mormonism to a "cult," saying such attacks have "[no] place in this country. " Romney's first direct response to comments from Pastor Robert Jeffress at the Values Voter Summit in Washington last week came at a news conference in New Hampshire on Tuesday, where the former Massachusetts governor announced the support of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. Perry, Romney said, "selected an individual to introduce him who then used religion as a basis for which he said he would endorse Gov. Perry and a reason to not support me. Gov. Perry then said that introduction 'just hit it out of the park.'" "I just don't believe that that kind of divisiveness based upon religion has a place in this country," Romney said.
OPINION
October 11, 2011
Are Mormons, including Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, Christians? Who cares? The Rev. Robert Jeffress does. The Baptist pastor from Dallas attracted attention last weekend for asserting, shortly after introducing Gov. Rick Perry at the Values Voter Summit, that Mormonism was not a branch of Christianity but rather a "cult. " Perry rushed to distance himself from that comment, saying through a spokesman that he didn't consider Mormonism a cult. All weekend long, the "Is he a Christian?"
OPINION
October 11, 2011 | Jonah Goldberg
Robert Jeffress introduced Texas Gov. Rick Perry at the Values Voter Summit on Friday. He started a great big hullabaloo by asking, "Do we want a candidate who is a good, moral person, or one who is a born-again follower of the Lord Jesus Christ?" Before we go on, let me just say, I'd probably go with curtain No. 1. Don't get me wrong — I've got no problem with a born-again Christian being my president, my pilot or my chiropodist. But saying someone is a born-again Christian, for me at least, is not inherently synonymous with being a "good, moral person," never mind being transparently preferable to one. In other words, I might vote for a born-again Christian on the assumption that his professed faith makes it more likely he's a good person.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Mitt Romney has been reluctant thus far to address controversial comments from a supporter of Rick Perry equating the Mormon religion with a cult. Jon Huntsman -- not so much. In an interview with CNN on Monday afternoon, the former Utah governor, who, like Romney, is a Mormon, called Pastor Robert Jeffress a "moron" (video below). "The fact that some moron can stand up and make a comment like that ... [is] outrageous," Huntsman told Wolf Blitzer on "The Situation Room. " "Anyone who is associated with someone willing to make those comments ought to distance themselves in very bold language.
NEWS
October 8, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Baseball metaphors are certainly in vogue this time of year, but never have they been so politically charged. Mitt Romney on Saturday used one to address controversial remarks from a supporter of chief rival Rick Perry, who just one day earlier equated Mormonism with a "cult. " Those remarks, from Dallas pastor Robert Jeffress, were made not on stage at the Values Voter Summit but to reporters who spoke with him after. But Perry had embraced him and thanked him for his endorsement and introduction when he addressed attendees Friday.
NEWS
October 8, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Ron Paul met the crowd at the Values Voter Summit in Washington on Saturday more than halfway. Speaking to a packed hotel ballroom filled with his admirers, the Republican presidential candidate laced his usual attacks on American fiscal and foreign policy with biblical allusions. He likened the sprawling federal government to the king sought by the Israelites in the book of Samuel. “We have too long relied upon our king in Washington and we have to change that,” Paul told the crowd, which was enthusiastic considering the early-morning hour.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Newt Gingrich does not like judges. That's the message the former House speaker sent to attendees at the Values Voter Summit on Friday afternoon. Gingrich delivered his speech after three other Republican presidential candidates - former Sen. Rick Santorum, Texas Gov. Rick Perry and retired pizza chain executive Herman Cain - made their pitch to the gathering of social conservatives. Gingrich's performance, however, felt more like a law school lecture than an appeal for the nomination.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Mitt Romney has been reluctant thus far to address controversial comments from a supporter of Rick Perry equating the Mormon religion with a cult. Jon Huntsman -- not so much. In an interview with CNN on Monday afternoon, the former Utah governor, who, like Romney, is a Mormon, called Pastor Robert Jeffress a "moron" (video below). "The fact that some moron can stand up and make a comment like that ... [is] outrageous," Huntsman told Wolf Blitzer on "The Situation Room. " "Anyone who is associated with someone willing to make those comments ought to distance themselves in very bold language.
NEWS
October 8, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Rep. Ron Paul of Texas turned out his well-organized crop of supporters Saturday and won a presidential preference straw poll with 37% of the vote. Coming in second place in the poll of social conservatives at the annual Values Voter Summit was retired pizza chain executive Herman Cain, who pulled in 23% of the vote.  Cain, who won a surprise victory in a straw poll last month in Florida, delivered a rousing speech Friday afternoon in which he joked about the pressure that comes with breaking into the “top tier” of candidates in the GOP primary race.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2011 | By James Oliphant and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Mitt Romney's Mormon faith, an issue that has largely stayed below the surface of the current presidential race, erupted into the open again at a gathering here of religious conservatives, reviving questions about whether some in the evangelical community could accept Romney as the GOP nominee. Romney spoke to the conference Saturday, a day after a Texas pastor and supporter of Rick Perry at the event labeled Mormonism "a cult" and said Romney was not a Christian. Perry's campaign quickly distanced itself from Robert Jeffress' remarks.
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