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NEWS
October 20, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scoring a huge victory that will help keep thousands of its Long Beach workers on the production line, McDonnell Douglas Corp. won a $1-billion contract Thursday to sell 50 of its new MD-95 commercial jetliners to a fast-growing regional airline in Atlanta. The company's Douglas Aircraft division had been awaiting a sizable award to formally launch production of the plane, which has been on the drawing board for four years.
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NEWS
November 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court in Atlanta threw out eight of nine convictions and most of an $11-million penalty against a defunct jet repair company blamed for the 1996 ValuJet crash that killed 110 people. The U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals said federal law at the time of the crash did not support SabreTech's conviction and sentence on eight counts of causing the transportation of hazardous materials. The 1999 conviction, the first of an aviation company in a U.S.
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BUSINESS
July 11, 1997 | From Associated Press
After more than a year of reminding too many people of a disaster rather than low fares, ValuJet on Thursday said it would take a new name. ValuJet is buying a much smaller airline, AirTran Airways, from Airways Corp. for $66.3 million worth of stock and taking its name. "We could pick one name or the other, and we felt that the AirTran name better represented the interests of the company," ValuJet President and Chief Executive D. Joseph Corr said.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Defunct aircraft maintenance contractor SabreTech Inc. agreed to pay a record $1.75-million penalty to settle allegations it violated hazardous-materials rules in the fiery 1996 ValuJet crash that killed 110 people in the Everglades, federal regulators said in Miami. As part of the settlement, the Federal Aviation Administration agreed to drop 10 of its 37 allegations that SabreTech violated Department of Transportation rules governing the handling of hazardous materials.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1996 | From Associated Press
ValuJet Airlines on Monday hired a former head of Continental Airlines to run its daily operations, allowing its top executives to concentrate on bolstering the carrier's finances and its public image. The moves come five weeks after Atlanta-based ValuJet emerged from a three-month grounding over safety concerns in the wake of the Florida Everglades crash that killed 110 people. D.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials of Northwest Airlines and its striking pilots' union met with a federal mediator at a Rosemont, Ill., hotel in an attempt to jump-start negotiations concerning compensation and job security. But the talks weren't expected to result in much beyond a date for more talks: The chasm dividing the two sides is about $180 million per year. Northwest canceled all flights through Tuesday and all incoming flights from Europe and Asia through Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
ValuJet Lays Off Recalled Workers: The Atlanta-based carrier said it laid off 134 employees it had recalled in anticipation of resuming service. The low-fare airline, which planned to be flying again by late this month, probably won't resume operations until September, regulators said. The Federal Aviation Administration has asked ValuJet Airlines to conduct additional demonstrations of its performance before resuming operations. In late July, ValuJet Inc.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
ValuJet Mechanics to Be Represented by Teamsters: ValuJet Airlines mechanics voted to accept representation by the union, a move that is "good news for airline passengers," said Teamsters General President Ron Carey. "ValuJet needs steady, experienced mechanics, not subcontracting of safety to the lowest bidder."
BUSINESS
July 24, 1997
Barney's Inc., which has been operating under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection since January 1996, said it will tell a bankruptcy court by Friday which buyout bid it has chosen, but may need extra time to file the agreement with the court. . . . ValuJet Airlines hired Chicago-based advertising agency Cramer-Krasselt to create its advertising when the carrier starts flying under the new name AirTran Airlines later this year. . . . Workers at an Aluminum Co. of America plant in Chandler, Ariz.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
ValuJet Airlines said it lost $20.6 million in the last three months of 1996, the first full quarter of operations since its 15-week grounding after a plane crash in the Florida Everglades that killed 110 people. That contrasts with a profit of $19.2 million for the same period a year earlier. For fourth-quarter 1996, the airline said it lost 38 cents per share, contrasted with income of 32 cents a share a year earlier. Excluding nonrecurring expenses of $13.
NEWS
December 7, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury on Monday found an airline-maintenance company guilty of nine hazardous-materials violations in connection with the handling of oxygen containers blamed for the 1996 crash of ValuJet Flight 592, which killed 110 people. SabreTech was cleared of the more serious charges of conspiracy and causing a destructive device to be put aboard an airplane. The firm--which no longer exists as such--faces possible fines of up to $2.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
Prosecutors rested their case Monday in the criminal conspiracy trial stemming from the 1996 crash of a ValuJet DC-9 that killed 110 people, prompting requests by the defense to end the trial for lack of evidence. Nearly two dozen prosecution witnesses have testified since a jury was chosen Nov. 15 to hear the first criminal trial arising from the crash.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | Reuters
AirTran Airways, the low-cost airline once known as ValuJet, and SabreTech, a former maintenance contractor for ValuJet, have settled multimillion-dollar lawsuits over the 1996 crash of ValuJet Flight 592 into the Florida Everglades that killed all 110 people on board. Orlando-based AirTran said it will receive an unspecified cash payment and added that none of the parties to the lawsuit admitted fault or liability. Terms of the settlement agreement were confidential, it said.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | Associated Press
A former executive and two ex-mechanics for an aviation maintenance company pleaded not guilty Thursday to federal charges stemming from the 1996 ValuJet crash that killed 110 people. The mechanics, Mauro Valenzuela and Eugene Florence, and Daniel Gonzalez, SabreTech Inc.'s former vice president of maintenance, made their pleas before a federal magistrate judge. An attorney entered the same plea for the company.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Three ex-employees of former ValuJet maintenance contractor SabreTech Inc. were freed on bond in Miami, two days after they were charged in the fiery 1996 crash of a ValuJet DC-9 that killed 110 people. Former SabreTech Vice President Daniel Gonzalez and former mechanics Eugene Florence and Mauro Valenzuela appeared before U.S. Magistrate William Turnoff, and each agreed to post a $50,000 bond and surrender travel documents. They were scheduled to return to court Aug.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years after ValuJet Flight 592 plunged into the Everglades, killing all 110 people on board, an airline maintenance company has been charged with murder and manslaughter for loading into the plane's cargo hold the flammable oxygen canisters blamed for the crash. In a state indictment Tuesday, SabreTech Inc. was charged with 110 counts of third-degree murder, 110 counts of manslaughter and one count of illegal transportation of hazardous waste.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials of Northwest Airlines and its striking pilots' union met with a federal mediator at a Rosemont, Ill., hotel in an attempt to jump-start negotiations concerning compensation and job security. But the talks weren't expected to result in much beyond a date for more talks: The chasm dividing the two sides is about $180 million per year. Northwest canceled all flights through Tuesday and all incoming flights from Europe and Asia through Wednesday.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators are fining a maintenance contractor $2.25 million for improperly handling oxygen generators blamed for a fire aboard the ValuJet plane that crashed in the Florida Everglades in 1996. The fine, announced Thursday against SabreTech Inc., is the largest the Federal Aviation Administration has assessed for hazardous materials violations. The company, which called the FAA's action "neither necessary nor justified," said it planned to dispute the proposed civil penalty.
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