Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVamo Inc
IN THE NEWS

Vamo Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writers
The wife of former Assistant Navy Secretary Melvyn R. Paisley was paid by a defense consulting firm established by a key figure in the Pentagon contract fraud scandal while her husband was the powerful chief of Navy procurement in the Pentagon, The Times has learned. Federal and state records show that Vicki A. Paisley received as much as $50,000 in 1986 from VAMO Inc., a Virginia consulting company formed early that year by William M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
In a corner of history far from the Pentagon fraud scandal that is now consuming his life, Melvyn R. Paisley was a hero--a World War II ace fighter pilot with a reputation for daring and a raft of medals to prove it. Like every other fighter pilot of that time, the young Paisley lived by his wits and flew by the seat of his pants. In defense of his country he suffered permanent ear damage, but when the dogfights were over, Paisley was always the victor.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
In a corner of history far from the Pentagon fraud scandal that is now consuming his life, Melvyn R. Paisley was a hero--a World War II ace fighter pilot with a reputation for daring and a raft of medals to prove it. Like every other fighter pilot of that time, the young Paisley lived by his wits and flew by the seat of his pants. In defense of his country he suffered permanent ear damage, but when the dogfights were over, Paisley was always the victor.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writers
The wife of former Assistant Navy Secretary Melvyn R. Paisley was paid by a defense consulting firm established by a key figure in the Pentagon contract fraud scandal while her husband was the powerful chief of Navy procurement in the Pentagon, The Times has learned. Federal and state records show that Vicki A. Paisley received as much as $50,000 in 1986 from VAMO Inc., a Virginia consulting company formed early that year by William M.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | DOUGLAS JEHL and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
Rep. James J. Florio (D-N.J.) said Tuesday that the role of former Assistant Navy Secretary Melvyn R. Paisley in the controversial award of a multibillion-dollar Aegis ship-defense system contract to Unisys is "deserving of intense scrutiny." The congressman, who had opposed the award when it was made in 1986, said subsequent disclosures in The Times and Defense News suggest that the contract was awarded for reasons "other than national security."
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
Melvyn R. Paisley, while assistant U.S. Navy secretary, abruptly revised bidding rules on a multibillion-dollar contract in a way that favored Unisys Corp. at a time when Paisley's wife was receiving up to $50,000 from a company formed by a principal Unisys lobbyist. ITT Corp.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
In the $150-billion-a-year defense industry, William M. Galvin considers himself a "quarterback"--a deal maker who huddles with key players in the military and political Establishment and devises stratagems that score huge projects for defense contractors. "That's what I do," Galvin, a primary target of the Pentagon procurement investigation, explained in a sworn statement in a lawsuit a few years back. "I do it on the telephone. I do it on face-to-face visits.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE and GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writers
Melvyn R. Paisley, in a period of less than a year while he was assistant secretary of the Navy, took a luxurious transatlantic cruise and a Virgin Islands trip with defense consultant William M. Galvin, according to sources and records obtained by The Times.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Operation Ill Wind blew like a hurricane through the homes and offices of Pentagon and defense industry officials over the past two weeks as FBI agents began seizing evidence of what they believe is massive corruption in the $150-billion-a-year Defense Department weapons-buying system. And the investigation is rapidly accumulating a cast of characters almost as vast and varied as the mountains of documents swept up by the FBI.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|