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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If they gave out Oscars for casting choices, you could reserve one right now for the makers of "Vamp" (citywide), who came up with the inspired notion of Grace Jones as a stripteasing vampire. The sleek, long-limbed pop star really does put the vamp back into vampire--with her heavy-lidded gaze and sinewy body, she's a night creature full of brooding, sexual malevolence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
Mysterious faerie/vampire Warlow (Rob Kazinsky) reveals his monstrous self -- and eventually gets staked in the heart -- on “Radioactive,” the sexy, gory, action-packed Season 6 finale of HBO's “True Blood.” Sookie Stackhouse (Anna Paquin) breaks the news to Warlow that she's not ready to go vampire and spend eternity together. Her vamp friends are safe, no longer needing Warlow's sun-resistant blood, so maybe dating is better than nuptials. As for her undead friends, they're dancing in the daylight, stripping off their Vamp Camp prison garb and engaging in orgiastic sex. They also want to play croquet and volleyball.
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MAGAZINE
November 26, 1995
I don't think there's a finer show on TV than "Prime Suspect," and its protagonist, Jane Tennison, played by Helen Mirren, is the only real woman on TV ("Vamp, Diva or Grande Dame? Does She Have to Choose?" by Bruce Shenitz, Oct. 22.) I was hoping American TV would have the guts to produce its own weekly "Prime Suspect," with Helen Mirren in the lead. And when I read how Mirren loves Shakespeare, I knew I'd chosen the right actress to be my favorite. Shereen Walker Los Angeles I have followed Mirren's acting career since I first saw her in "Prime Suspect."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
With the “true death” about to strike down all the inmates at notorious Vamp Camp, rivals Bill Compton (Stephen Moyer) and Eric Northman (Alexander Skarsgard) come to the rescue in “Life Matters,” Episode 69 of HBO's “True Blood.” In the previous episode, Eric drained nearly all the blood from Warlow (Rob Kazinsky), an ancient faerie/vampire who can walk the earth day or night. Now vampire Bill wants what's left of that blood to save his imprisoned subjects. But that's a nonstarter for Sookie Stackhouse (Anna Paquin)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1989 | CRAIG LEE
Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman were the major-domos of Prince's mighty Revolution, but recently there's been some purple rain on Wendy & Lisa's parade. For one thing, they were recently dropped by their record label after two post-Prince albums. But the dynamic duo came out of their corner fighting at the Roxy on Friday, scoring points with a series of hard and heavy grooves. On a stage decorated in vintage hippie style, the women's seven-piece band unleashed a rich wash of sound, Coleman's ethereal keyboards and Melvoin's Hendrixian guitar centering material that ranged from the teasing funk of "Hey Yeah" to the propulsive heights of Prince's "Mountains."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2009 | Richard S. Ginell
As frequent Los Angeles Philharmonic guest conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya pointed out, Tuesday night's Hollywood Bowl concert had a unifying theme. Every piece on the program was written by a French composer, and every piece was affected by the "Spanish tinge" -- as Jelly Roll Morton put it -- to some degree. Sometimes you had to listen hard to find Spain in the sound, but it was there. It was the kind of classical program that symphonic pops conductor and once-perennial Bowl visitor Erich Kunzel -- who passed away Tuesday at the age of 74 -- would have felt at home in. At the same time, it was a type of program that has been rendered obsolete over the decades as film and TV music, pop culture, Lloyd Webber salutes and the like hijacked the summer pops trade.
REAL ESTATE
November 29, 1992 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MADONNA, pop music's wealthiest material girl with estimated 1991 earnings of $48 million, has purchased a $5-million mansion in the Hollywood Hills. The singer/actress co-stars in the upcoming MGM movie "Body of Evidence" as a woman on trial for the murder of her lover, an elderly man who dies while the two are having sex.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Gina McIntyre
It's a crisp May morning on the set of "The Twilight Saga: New Moon," and Michael Sheen strides into an elaborate reconstruction of an Italianate marble hall in costume as Aro, the head of the Volturi, a menacing group of age-old vampires that metes out justice in the realm of the supernatural. Dressed in a cloak, he's sporting long, black locks, bright red lips and matching tinted contact lenses that give him a distinctly malevolent look. When a reporter asks if it's uncomfortable to look through the eyes of a monster, he suggests, quite politely and quite to the contrary: "No, I think it's more uncomfortable for you."
NEWS
August 3, 1987 | TED THACKREY Jr. and GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writers
Pola Negri, the silent screen "vamp" whose passion on film was more than matched by highly publicized off-screen love affairs with Charlie Chaplin and Rudolph Valentino, has died in a hospital in San Antonio, Tex. A spokeswoman for Northeast Baptist Hospital, where Miss Negri was being treated for pneumonia, said the actress died in her sleep Saturday. Funeral services were pending Sunday.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Director Bob Clark didn't strike box-office pay dirt until 1981, when his "Porky's" emerged as a hit. But he directed several well-regarded horror films in the previous decade, including the 1972 B-movie "Deathdream," a primitive yet potent and compelling thriller.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Having made two of the most insightful, affectionate films about teenagers with "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" and "Clueless," Amy Heckerling jumps on the most recent youth bandwagon with "Vamps. " Written and directed by Heckerling, "Vamps" isn't quite the low-hanging logline of "Clueless" meets "Twilight" though in some respects it is about the twilight of cluelessness - or how age and maturity do not necessarily equal the onset of fogey-dom, but rather offer a sense of greater understanding and seeing beyond oneself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
With "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse" topping $200 million at the domestic box office, you'd think it would be easy to roll out a movie about a young vampire in love. But "Let Me In," the English-language remake of the cult hit "Let the Right One In," is finding itself in a situation more fraught than Count Dracula at an afternoon blood drive. Tomas Alfredson's Swedish-language original, based on a script and novel by John Ajvide Lindqvist, told the story of a pre-teen loner named Oskar and his tender friendship with the oddball, sexually ambiguous Eli, who is revealed to be a vampire.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Gina McIntyre
It's a crisp May morning on the set of "The Twilight Saga: New Moon," and Michael Sheen strides into an elaborate reconstruction of an Italianate marble hall in costume as Aro, the head of the Volturi, a menacing group of age-old vampires that metes out justice in the realm of the supernatural. Dressed in a cloak, he's sporting long, black locks, bright red lips and matching tinted contact lenses that give him a distinctly malevolent look. When a reporter asks if it's uncomfortable to look through the eyes of a monster, he suggests, quite politely and quite to the contrary: "No, I think it's more uncomfortable for you."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2009 | Richard S. Ginell
As frequent Los Angeles Philharmonic guest conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya pointed out, Tuesday night's Hollywood Bowl concert had a unifying theme. Every piece on the program was written by a French composer, and every piece was affected by the "Spanish tinge" -- as Jelly Roll Morton put it -- to some degree. Sometimes you had to listen hard to find Spain in the sound, but it was there. It was the kind of classical program that symphonic pops conductor and once-perennial Bowl visitor Erich Kunzel -- who passed away Tuesday at the age of 74 -- would have felt at home in. At the same time, it was a type of program that has been rendered obsolete over the decades as film and TV music, pop culture, Lloyd Webber salutes and the like hijacked the summer pops trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
There's nothing like a little harp music to soothe jangled nerves. Popular at weddings, funerals and not a few brises, the age-old instrument, with its sensual curves and ethereal-sounding glissandi, not only has an aristocratic air but also seems an anachronism in today's techno-obsessed world. That image, however, gets a makeover with the, shall we say, unconventional cabaret act known as "Dueling Harps."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2007 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
"Oh, I love my vampire!" CBS President of Entertainment Nina Tassler said recently, beginning a conversation about her network's new drama, "Moonlight." Clearly, she must. No other TV show this fall has experienced as much turbulence as "Moonlight." But through all of the changes in the executive producing ranks, the cast and the show's framework, CBS hasn't budged in its support, scheduling it in between its reliable Friday-night fare, "Ghost Whisperer" and "Numb3rs."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1999 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Ever since the dark hour when Twyla Tharp went classical, Swedish choreographer Mats Ek has been the unchallenged Wizard of Twitch: the master of eccentric, high-speed body squiggles that link up in complex choreographic mosaics but always look spontaneous, intuitive and unpredictable.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Having made two of the most insightful, affectionate films about teenagers with "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" and "Clueless," Amy Heckerling jumps on the most recent youth bandwagon with "Vamps. " Written and directed by Heckerling, "Vamps" isn't quite the low-hanging logline of "Clueless" meets "Twilight" though in some respects it is about the twilight of cluelessness - or how age and maturity do not necessarily equal the onset of fogey-dom, but rather offer a sense of greater understanding and seeing beyond oneself.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
WITH "Basic Instinct 2," the "Basic Instinct" franchise (who saw it coming?) enters its unhinged rococo phase. Set in a carefully curated London, abstracted and glamorized to a fare-thee-well, the new movie makes the original Verhoeven-Eszterhas collaboration look positively Hellenic. It's just that fancy. Every surface is buffed, shiny, unbelievably expensive -- including Sharon Stone herself, who, should the situation arise, could double as her own limited edition action figure.
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