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Vampira

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | Christine Ziaya
With Halloween looming, horror hostess Elvira (a.k.a. Cassandra Peterson) is profitably haunting the airwaves in a Coors commercial, TV appearances, radio specials, et al. Although her syndicated TV show, "Movie Macabre," is no longer aired on KHJ Channel 9, where it originated, it's in about 72 other cities and destined for Australia. And there are a glut of other Elvira enterprises in the works. Meanwhile, former local TV personality Vampira (a.k.a.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
In the early days of television, when horror movies were often campy by nature, actress Maila Nurmi created the character Vampira, a glamorous ghoul who as hostess of late-night fright films in the 1950s layered on her own brand of camp. Vampira played with her pet tarantula, gave gruesome recipes for vampire cocktails and bathed in a boiling caldron. With a knack for the double- entendre and the requisite blood-chilling scream, Vampira was a hit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987
Regarding Christine Ziaya's Outtakes article about Elvira and Vampira (Oct. 25), I must say that Maila Nurmi (a.k.a. Vampira) is totally insane if she expects us to believe that Elvira in any way, shape or form ripped off her character. Elvira is nothing short of a true American institution who deserves a lot better (to put it mildly) than what Nurmi is trying to give her. Wake up and smell the formaldehyde, Vampira! Elvira is here to stay and there isn't a thing you can do about it!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988
Actually, both Elvira and Vampira are indebted to the late cartoonist Charles Addams, whose ghoulish cartoons in the 1940s, etc., featured a slinky lady who was obviously the inspiration for these characters. (Not to mention television's "The Munsters.") Who can ever forget the Addams woman slinking up to a neighbor's door, saying, "May I borrow a cup of cyanide?" Let's have an end to this nonsense! JANE BARTON Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988
The alleged pirating of Vampira's persona by Elvira is more than an issue of makeup (Outtakes item by Pat H. Broeske, Oct. 2). The TV studio props used by Elvira (Cassandra Petersen)--the candelabra, the Victorian-style sofa--these are the same things that Vampira (Maila Nurmi) used on television in 1954. Vampira opened her show by slinking through a mist-filled hallway. Now who else do we know who does that? What about the cleavage? The V-cut dress Vampira wore in 1954, Elvira has that, and she added a slit up the dress to expose her right leg. (I'm not complaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988
Actually, both Elvira and Vampira are indebted to the late cartoonist Charles Addams, whose ghoulish cartoons in the 1940s, etc., featured a slinky lady who was obviously the inspiration for these characters. (Not to mention television's "The Munsters.") Who can ever forget the Addams woman slinking up to a neighbor's door, saying, "May I borrow a cup of cyanide?" Let's have an end to this nonsense! JANE BARTON Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
In the early days of television, when horror movies were often campy by nature, actress Maila Nurmi created the character Vampira, a glamorous ghoul who as hostess of late-night fright films in the 1950s layered on her own brand of camp. Vampira played with her pet tarantula, gave gruesome recipes for vampire cocktails and bathed in a boiling caldron. With a knack for the double- entendre and the requisite blood-chilling scream, Vampira was a hit.
NEWS
October 23, 1988
A reply to letter-writer Robert D. Stone who implied that TV horror hostess Elvira is ripping off Vampira's persona and ideas (Calendar Letters, Oct. 16): Elvira and Vampira have about as much in common as Hulk Hogan and Pee-Wee Herman. ROGER HURST Glendale
BOOKS
February 15, 1987
This is to request information concerning Maila Nurmi for biographical research purposes. Miss Nurmi was best known for the Vampira character she developed for her 1954 Los Angeles- based television show. She appeared as a comedienne on network television during that period and in several low-budget films before disappearing from the public eye in the early 1960s. Prior to her work in Hollywood, Nurmi appeared in two Mike Todd shows in New York. Anyone with knowledge of Nurmi's life and work on either coast, please contact me at the following address.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988
The alleged pirating of Vampira's persona by Elvira is more than an issue of makeup (Outtakes item by Pat H. Broeske, Oct. 2). The TV studio props used by Elvira (Cassandra Petersen)--the candelabra, the Victorian-style sofa--these are the same things that Vampira (Maila Nurmi) used on television in 1954. Vampira opened her show by slinking through a mist-filled hallway. Now who else do we know who does that? What about the cleavage? The V-cut dress Vampira wore in 1954, Elvira has that, and she added a slit up the dress to expose her right leg. (I'm not complaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987
Regarding Christine Ziaya's Outtakes article about Elvira and Vampira (Oct. 25), I must say that Maila Nurmi (a.k.a. Vampira) is totally insane if she expects us to believe that Elvira in any way, shape or form ripped off her character. Elvira is nothing short of a true American institution who deserves a lot better (to put it mildly) than what Nurmi is trying to give her. Wake up and smell the formaldehyde, Vampira! Elvira is here to stay and there isn't a thing you can do about it!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | Christine Ziaya
With Halloween looming, horror hostess Elvira (a.k.a. Cassandra Peterson) is profitably haunting the airwaves in a Coors commercial, TV appearances, radio specials, et al. Although her syndicated TV show, "Movie Macabre," is no longer aired on KHJ Channel 9, where it originated, it's in about 72 other cities and destined for Australia. And there are a glut of other Elvira enterprises in the works. Meanwhile, former local TV personality Vampira (a.k.a.
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