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Vampire Bat

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NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / From the Booster Shots blog
The first reported case of human rabies linked to a vampire bat was reported today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The case, which happened about a year ago, resulted in the death of a 19-year-old man from Mexico. In the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report , the case went down this way: The man's mother said her son had been bitten on the heel of his left foot while he was sleeping. The man, who has living in Michoacán, Mexico, apparently never reported the bite or was treated for it. Ten days later he traveled to Louisiana to work at a sugarcane plantation, where after one day of work he got medical help for a variety of symptoms, including fatigue, pain in his left shoulder and numbness in his left hand.
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SCIENCE
August 1, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Rabies is generally thought to be universally fatal, but new evidence suggests that is not always the case. A study in Peru suggests that some people -- admittedly a very small percentage of the population -- may have a natural resistance to the rabies virus that protects them from serious illness when they become infected. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop new ways to prevent and treat rabies. Most Americans associate rabies with dogs, but the virus is most commonly carried by bats.  Experts estimate that rabies kills at least 55,000 people each year in Africa and Asia alone, and the disease appears to be on the rise in China, the former Soviet republics, and Central and South America.
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HEALTH
October 30, 2000 | Rosie Mestel
In spirit with the season, we'd like to say a couple of words about the noble vampire bat. Noble? Well, maybe not noble. But the bats, unlike the vast majority of animals, form favor-swapping friendships rather like human ones. Say a bat is hungry because it didn't find a neck to bite that night. Well, another bat will spit up some of the blood it scored and give its famished pal a feed. Bat pals also hang out together and indulge in mutual grooming.
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Pity the poor vampire bat. It's bad enough that it's called a vampire bat, but lately the creature has been in need of some spin control. Last week the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that about a year ago a young man in the U.S. died from rabies linked to a vampire bat, the first such reported death in the country. The CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report noted that the man was bitten while in Michoacan, Mexico, then later traveled to the U.S. for work, where he eventually sought treatment and died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1991 | SY MONTGOMERY, Montgomery is a free - lance writer based in Hancock, N.H
It's probably the most loathed mammal on the planet. Although only a few inches long, with the fewest teeth of any bat species, the common vampire--the Latin American blood-eater that inspired the 1899 tale of Dracula--arouses more horror and hatred than any other creature in the animal kingdom except, perhaps, snakes. But the vampire's true life story, new research shows, is far more intriguing than the myths it inspires. As it turns out, the vampire is really--well, a very nice animal.
HEALTH
June 20, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Every minute counts when someone suffers a stroke. Yet because symptoms are often subtle, most victims arrive at the hospital too late to use medication to dissolve the blood clots that cause most of the brain attacks. As a consequence, thousands of victims suffer severe brain damage or even die. Bat saliva could hold the key to saving them. An experimental drug based on a vampire bat protein has shown promise in clearing away clots up to several hours after a stroke.
WORLD
May 18, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Cattleman Francisco Oliva was on a roundup -- of vampire bats. After a swarm of the blood-slurping creatures divebombed his herd and drank their fill one recent night, he corralled several dozen of them in special contraptions that look like giant badminton nets. He put each bat in a cage and then brushed a poison called vampirin on their backs before releasing them. Back in the bat roost, the animals would be groomed by as many as 20 other bats, causing their deaths. Or so Oliva hoped.
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | MARK STEVENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Vampires are real, in bat form anyway, and many Mexicans have to live with them, along with dozens of other harmless bats. Mexico--among the first places where Europeans saw blood-eating bats--may have been the birthplace of the modern Vampire myth, which associates the flying mammals with the much older legend of the living dead.
SCIENCE
August 1, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Rabies is generally thought to be universally fatal, but new evidence suggests that is not always the case. A study in Peru suggests that some people -- admittedly a very small percentage of the population -- may have a natural resistance to the rabies virus that protects them from serious illness when they become infected. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop new ways to prevent and treat rabies. Most Americans associate rabies with dogs, but the virus is most commonly carried by bats.  Experts estimate that rabies kills at least 55,000 people each year in Africa and Asia alone, and the disease appears to be on the rise in China, the former Soviet republics, and Central and South America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1997
Eruptions Flowing lava and falling debris from the most violent eruption so far at Montserrat's Soufriere Hills volcano destroyed the capital of Plymouth. "One can say the city is completely wiped off the map," said Jean-Christophe Komorovski, director of the Caribbean island's volcano observatory. Nearly all buildings were set on fire. The British government may poll the colony's residents to find out whether they want to be permanently moved off the unstable island.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / From the Booster Shots blog
The first reported case of human rabies linked to a vampire bat was reported today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The case, which happened about a year ago, resulted in the death of a 19-year-old man from Mexico. In the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report , the case went down this way: The man's mother said her son had been bitten on the heel of his left foot while he was sleeping. The man, who has living in Michoacán, Mexico, apparently never reported the bite or was treated for it. Ten days later he traveled to Louisiana to work at a sugarcane plantation, where after one day of work he got medical help for a variety of symptoms, including fatigue, pain in his left shoulder and numbness in his left hand.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
Vampire bats like it warm: To home in and bite with fanged efficiency, they've developed a temperature sensor to guide them to their prey, a new study has found. All mammals need heat sensors to help them avoid potentially harmful temperatures such as those that would be encountered from a forest fire or dangerously hot water. This is achieved by a protein called TRPV1 that forms a pore — known as an ion channel — in the membranes of cells. TRPV1 detects temperatures higher than 109 degrees Fahrenheit.
HEALTH
October 30, 2006 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
JUST for the record, vampire bats don't suck. They lap. Under the cover of darkness, the mouse-sized Desmodus rotundus flies out from rocky caves to find a sleeping horse or cow. Its razor-sharp incisors carve out a tidy crater of flesh, no bigger than a Halloween M&M, usually without waking its prey. Then, perched over the welling wound, the vampire bat laps up about a tablespoon of blood -- its sole source of nourishment -- with a delicate, bright-pink tongue.
HEALTH
June 20, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Every minute counts when someone suffers a stroke. Yet because symptoms are often subtle, most victims arrive at the hospital too late to use medication to dissolve the blood clots that cause most of the brain attacks. As a consequence, thousands of victims suffer severe brain damage or even die. Bat saliva could hold the key to saving them. An experimental drug based on a vampire bat protein has shown promise in clearing away clots up to several hours after a stroke.
WORLD
May 18, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Cattleman Francisco Oliva was on a roundup -- of vampire bats. After a swarm of the blood-slurping creatures divebombed his herd and drank their fill one recent night, he corralled several dozen of them in special contraptions that look like giant badminton nets. He put each bat in a cage and then brushed a poison called vampirin on their backs before releasing them. Back in the bat roost, the animals would be groomed by as many as 20 other bats, causing their deaths. Or so Oliva hoped.
SCIENCE
March 19, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
As if it were not enough that vampire bats can swoop down from the sky to get a blood dinner from their victims, it turns out that they can also run across the ground to sneak up on them. No other bat has been shown to run; in fact, most can barely walk, shuffling awkwardly from a sprawled position.
HEALTH
October 30, 2006 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
JUST for the record, vampire bats don't suck. They lap. Under the cover of darkness, the mouse-sized Desmodus rotundus flies out from rocky caves to find a sleeping horse or cow. Its razor-sharp incisors carve out a tidy crater of flesh, no bigger than a Halloween M&M, usually without waking its prey. Then, perched over the welling wound, the vampire bat laps up about a tablespoon of blood -- its sole source of nourishment -- with a delicate, bright-pink tongue.
NEWS
October 27, 1985 | GAYLE YOUNG, United Press International
Bats may make scary decorations for Halloween, but scientists say the furry creatures of the night have gotten a bad name unfairly. "They really are the least dangerous animals around," said Gary McCracken, an associate professor of zoology at the University of Tennessee who has studied literally millions of bats. The only time bats ever try to hurt McCracken is when he takes samples of their blood with a hypodermic needle. He takes blood from bats?
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | MARK STEVENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Vampires are real, in bat form anyway, and many Mexicans have to live with them, along with dozens of other harmless bats. Mexico--among the first places where Europeans saw blood-eating bats--may have been the birthplace of the modern Vampire myth, which associates the flying mammals with the much older legend of the living dead.
HEALTH
October 30, 2000 | Rosie Mestel
In spirit with the season, we'd like to say a couple of words about the noble vampire bat. Noble? Well, maybe not noble. But the bats, unlike the vast majority of animals, form favor-swapping friendships rather like human ones. Say a bat is hungry because it didn't find a neck to bite that night. Well, another bat will spit up some of the blood it scored and give its famished pal a feed. Bat pals also hang out together and indulge in mutual grooming.
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