Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVampire Film
IN THE NEWS

Vampire Film

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
It took Hollywood awhile to learn exactly how to handle the modern horror film fan, but now studios and filmmakers know you have to win fans over early to make a big splatter at the box office. And you also have to make your film stand out, because the amount of competition has gotten, well, scary. Take the vampire flick "30 Days of Night" from Sony's Columbia Pictures and Sam Raimi's Ghost House Pictures, which opens Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's not so much that Jim Jarmusch has edged toward the mainstream but rather that the mainstream has moved closer to him. Over the years the gravitational pull of his slant, laconic sensibility in films such as "Mystery Train," "Dead Man" and "Broken Flowers" has brought him in contact with a classic gallery of performers including Tom Waits, Joe Strummer, Gena Rowlands, Johnny Depp, Bill Murray and many more. Though he first emerged from the outcast environs of the late '70s/early '80s post-punk scene of New York, he has recently received retrospectives from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles and the Film Society of Lincoln Center . At 61 he is no longer a punk outsider but part of the pantheon.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Like any big industry, Hollywood doesn't like surprises. And because the movie business is hardly ever certain of its own opinions, it subjects almost everything -- posters, casting, remake ideas -- to extensive polling. Every weekend, the studios turn to three research firms to help predict upcoming box-office numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In what might be an industry first, movie director Robert Rodriguez ("Desperado," "Machete," "Sin City") has his own TV channel. Born out of a commitment by Comcast, as it acquired an interest in NBCUniversal, to carry minority-owned networks, El Rey (also available via Time Warner and DirecTV) has as its sometime-stated target young English-speaking Latinos. Or rather, young English-speaking Latinos - and anyone else with a television - who likes the sort of movies Rodriguez makes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman and Gina McIntyre
While a recent cheating scandal involving Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson may be affecting their personal lives, it has yet to have any serious ramifications on the young "Twilight" stars' careers. As Pattinson hit the promotional trail this week to talk up his new collaboration with David Cronenberg, "Cosmopolis," in which he stars as a paranoid billionaire, reports surfaced that Stewart had been dropped from a planned follow-up to her summer film “Snow White and the Huntsman.” But the studio that released that film, Universal, insists that plans for a second movie centering on the Huntsman character played by Chris Hemsworth are proceeding and that Stewart's Snow White could still be a character in that film, despite reports that suggested otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1985 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Vampires are very hard to kill. Vampire movies have been equally death-resistant from early in the silent era. Like Westerns, the fang films have their ups and downs. Lately it's been the downs for both vampires and Westerns. But on those rare moments when there is no night-blooming Transylvanian in sight, we can be sure he (or indeed she) is lurking around the corner, getting the act together in the editing room. And so it is again.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In the to-the-point argot of Hollywood, director Tony Scott was known as a shooter, a term of respect that cut two different ways. In one sense, "shooter" referred to the eye for images Tony shared with his brother Ridley, an eye that first came to industry notice in 1983's "The Hunger," an outré designer vampire film starring Catherine Deneuve, David Bowie and Susan Sarandon. But a talent for visuals was not all Tony Scott had. Shooter also referred to the director's gift for making things move on screen, for shooting action like there was no tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
The weekend following the long Thanksgiving holiday is traditionally sluggish for the film business — and this year was no exception. With no new movies opening nationwide, audiences shied away from the multiplex after heading there in droves over turkey day. As a result, it was the second-slowest moviegoing weekend of the year, with ticket receipts totaling only $82 million, according to data compiled by Hollywood.com. "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1" claimed the No. 1 spot at the box office for the third consecutive weekend, again besting "The Muppets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2009 | Jen Chaney, Chaney writes for the Washington Post.
It's every adolescent's fantasy: Meet a fascinating, remarkably pale member of the opposite sex, fall in love, then realize that he or she is a full-on, blood-guzzling vampire.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's not so much that Jim Jarmusch has edged toward the mainstream but rather that the mainstream has moved closer to him. Over the years the gravitational pull of his slant, laconic sensibility in films such as "Mystery Train," "Dead Man" and "Broken Flowers" has brought him in contact with a classic gallery of performers including Tom Waits, Joe Strummer, Gena Rowlands, Johnny Depp, Bill Murray and many more. Though he first emerged from the outcast environs of the late '70s/early '80s post-punk scene of New York, he has recently received retrospectives from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles and the Film Society of Lincoln Center . At 61 he is no longer a punk outsider but part of the pantheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman
Moviegoers were held captive by "Taken 2" at the box office this weekend, as the Liam Neeson sequel had a superb No. 1 debut. The kidnapping action- thriller opened to a strong $50 million, according to an estimate from distributor Twentieth Century Fox. That's double what the first "Taken" launched with back in 2009, when its $24.7-million start surprised on the historically slow Super Bowl weekend. While the Neeson flick met the highest of industry projections, the stop-motion animated "Frankenweenie" fell short of even its studio's modest hopes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In the to-the-point argot of Hollywood, director Tony Scott was known as a shooter, a term of respect that cut two different ways. In one sense, "shooter" referred to the eye for images Tony shared with his brother Ridley, an eye that first came to industry notice in 1983's "The Hunger," an outré designer vampire film starring Catherine Deneuve, David Bowie and Susan Sarandon. But a talent for visuals was not all Tony Scott had. Shooter also referred to the director's gift for making things move on screen, for shooting action like there was no tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman and Gina McIntyre
While a recent cheating scandal involving Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson may be affecting their personal lives, it has yet to have any serious ramifications on the young "Twilight" stars' careers. As Pattinson hit the promotional trail this week to talk up his new collaboration with David Cronenberg, "Cosmopolis," in which he stars as a paranoid billionaire, reports surfaced that Stewart had been dropped from a planned follow-up to her summer film “Snow White and the Huntsman.” But the studio that released that film, Universal, insists that plans for a second movie centering on the Huntsman character played by Chris Hemsworth are proceeding and that Stewart's Snow White could still be a character in that film, despite reports that suggested otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
The weekend following the long Thanksgiving holiday is traditionally sluggish for the film business — and this year was no exception. With no new movies opening nationwide, audiences shied away from the multiplex after heading there in droves over turkey day. As a result, it was the second-slowest moviegoing weekend of the year, with ticket receipts totaling only $82 million, according to data compiled by Hollywood.com. "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1" claimed the No. 1 spot at the box office for the third consecutive weekend, again besting "The Muppets.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011
The Vampire-Con Film Festival returns to the New Beverly for the third year, offering up four ways to appreciate the undead on the big screen. Friday's double feature, "Revenge of the 80s," presents "Fright Night" (1985) plus "Vampire's Kiss" (1988), while Saturday trots out the Blacula franchise — "Blacula" (1972) and "Scream, Blacula, Scream!" (1973) — for "Saturday Night Vampire Fever. " Don't forget to dress in your vampire finest for the festival's costume contest. New Beverly Cinema, 7165 W. Beverly Blvd., L.A. Fri. 8 and 10:20 p.m.; Sat. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $7 each day. (323)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010
Even though he decided to tackle the English-language remake of "Let the Right One In" long before the Swedish vampire movie became a cult favorite in the U.S., Matt Reeves was aware of the hurdle facing him. "It suddenly got very big, and I thought, 'There's going to be a lot more focus.' It was terrifying. " As it turned out, Reeves rose to the challenge. Resisting the temptation to overly Americanize the dark preadolescent romance, Reeves kept the two protagonists' ages roughly the same as in Tomas Alfredson's original and retained a Gothic, snowy locale.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman
Moviegoers were held captive by "Taken 2" at the box office this weekend, as the Liam Neeson sequel had a superb No. 1 debut. The kidnapping action- thriller opened to a strong $50 million, according to an estimate from distributor Twentieth Century Fox. That's double what the first "Taken" launched with back in 2009, when its $24.7-million start surprised on the historically slow Super Bowl weekend. While the Neeson flick met the highest of industry projections, the stop-motion animated "Frankenweenie" fell short of even its studio's modest hopes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You want vampires? "Queen of the Damned" has vampires. Lots and lots of vampires. As enumerated in the credits, there are New York Vampires and Euro Trash Vampires, a Vampire in the Park and a Pale Faced Vampire, Club Vampires and a Vampire Doorman, even a simple Vampire Girl, not to be confused with Vampire Girls Sucking. Etc.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
With "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse" topping $200 million at the domestic box office, you'd think it would be easy to roll out a movie about a young vampire in love. But "Let Me In," the English-language remake of the cult hit "Let the Right One In," is finding itself in a situation more fraught than Count Dracula at an afternoon blood drive. Tomas Alfredson's Swedish-language original, based on a script and novel by John Ajvide Lindqvist, told the story of a pre-teen loner named Oskar and his tender friendship with the oddball, sexually ambiguous Eli, who is revealed to be a vampire.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2010
MOVIES Vampire-Con Film Fest Holding a vampire movie marathon in sun-drenched L.A. may seem odd, but there's plenty for horror fans to sink their teeth into at this celebration of cinematic bloodsuckers. Highlights include the 1931 Spanish-language version of "Dracula," which was shot on the same sets at the Bela Lugosi version, and Werner Herzog's surreal "Nosferatu the Vampyre." New Beverly Cinema, 7165 W. Beverly Blvd., Hollywood. 7:30 and 9:35 p.m. Fri. 5:15, 7:30 and 9:40 p.m. Sat. $7. (323)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|