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Vampires

ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
NBC's "Grimm" and ABC's "Once Upon a Time" are two structurally different shows — one is a police procedural, the other a family drama — that share the same twist: fairy tales as historical nonfiction. In "Grimm," David Giuntoli plays Nick Burckhardt, a Portland, Ore., police detective who discovers that he is the latest in a long line of second-sighted slayers, sort of like Buffy only with fairy-tale monsters instead of vampires. In "Once Upon a Time," Jennifer Morrison (late of "House")
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Television Critic
THE BEST thing about Alan Ball's new vampire series "True Blood," which premieres on HBO Sunday, is the opening credits. The jittery compilation of unnerving images -- prayer meetings and road kill, ghostly children and swamp scenery -- is creepy, evocative and tantalizing. Unfortunately, it is also utterly unconnected to the show that follows. For reasons known only to himself, Ball decided to take Charlaine Harris' light, fun series of Southern Vampire Mysteries and turn it into a heavy-handed political fable with vampires, recently rendered "safe" by the creation of the synthetic Tru Blood as stand-ins for the disenfranchised.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Michael Wilmington is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Authors strive to create immortal characters; movie actors long to play them. And what film character achieves immortality quite like Count Dracula, Transylvania's venerable, life-seeking, blood-drinking Lord of the Undead? Ever since 1922, when Max Schreck first gave him silent life in F. W. Murnau's German classic, "Nosferatu," Dracula has been through one cinematic resurrection after another.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010 | By Patrick Kevin Day
An Australian billboard showing the physical deterioration of a pretty young woman over two years of drug abuse inspired "Daybreakers" creature designer Steven Boyle to give the film's badly mutated "Subsiders" vampires similar characteristics. "When people see the Subsiders, I wanted them to feel pity and disgust before they felt fear," Boyle said. While some of the vampires got away with minimal makeup, performer Bryan Probets had to wear a full-body foam latex suit. Everything was covered except for the inside of his ears and the soles of his feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
The 1950s gave us the Rat Pack. The ‘80s, the Brat Pack. These days, the Wolf Pack is roaming the film scene. Although the "Twilight" franchise may have helped spur the vampire craze with the Cullen brood, the saga's gang of shape-shifters is bringing sexy back to werewolves. And in "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse," which hits theaters June 30, that's no different. "The Cullens are very reserved," said Alex Meraz, who plays Wolf Pack member Paul. "They're vampires, but they're not out killing people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2011
The Official Twilight Convention: Finally, somebody starts paying attention to little Stephenie Meyer's fantasies of repressed teen desire filtered through the prism of bloodthirsty but sort of ethical vampires. There will be something for every fanatic at this conference celebrating Meyer's series of books and movies, including a panel on bloodsucker lexicon, a karaoke party with Tinsel Korey and Julia Jones, and a vampire ball where you should be able to strut in your finest velvet and high collar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
Mysterious faerie/vampire Warlow (Rob Kazinsky) reveals his monstrous self -- and eventually gets staked in the heart -- on “Radioactive,” the sexy, gory, action-packed Season 6 finale of HBO's “True Blood.” Sookie Stackhouse (Anna Paquin) breaks the news to Warlow that she's not ready to go vampire and spend eternity together. Her vamp friends are safe, no longer needing Warlow's sun-resistant blood, so maybe dating is better than nuptials. As for her undead friends, they're dancing in the daylight, stripping off their Vamp Camp prison garb and engaging in orgiastic sex. They also want to play croquet and volleyball.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neck-biting nobleman dispatched by 19th-Century literature to haunt this wind-swept outreach of Transylvania has stirred to life in the post-Communist era as the embodiment of a culture clash between patriotic Romanians and Hollywood. Romanians, only recently acquainted with the Western version of Dracula, are spurning the caped count of Irishman Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. That's because they fear the fictional vampire--and his celluloid successors--may taint the reputation of a real-life hero.
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