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Van Cliburn

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Chris Barton
The only classical pianist who has received a ticker-tape parade in New York City, Van Cliburn has announced through his publicist that he has been diagnosed with advanced bone cancer. Raised in Texas and educated at Juilliard, Harvey Lavan "Van" Cliburn earned global fame at age 23 when he won the first International Tchaikovsky Piano Competition in Moscow in 1958, which occurred at the height of the Cold War. Cliburn performed Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 and Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1, and his later recording of the latter was the first classical recording to sell 1 million copies and eventually went triple-platinum (Movement III of the song is shown above, taken from a performance when Cliburn returned to Russia in 1962)
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NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Carla Hall
It's difficult to imagine a more ludicrous attempt at diplomacy than former basketball star Dennis Rodman's current sojourn to North Korea. On his past trips (this is his fourth in less than a year) Rodman has referred to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as his “friend for life” and spent time with Kim's family, calling him a “good dad” - as if the young dictator were just another misunderstood world leader and not the tyrannical ruler of an impoverished country who is capable of ordering his uncle's execution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By David Ng
Van Cliburn, the lanky Texan pianist who died Wednesday at 78, was an unofficial cultural ambassador for the United States during much of the Cold War. His win at the 1958 International Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow made him a beloved musical figure both in the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. OBIT: Van Cliburn, pianist who gave U.S. a Cold War victory, dies at 78 In the above video created by the musician's foundation, Cliburn is shown performing in Moscow to appreciative audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Donna Perlmutter
Pianist Van Cliburn, who died of bone cancer Feb. 27, did not go in for routine blandishments -- no matter that he was a paragon of Southern gentlemanliness.  “But I'm a great audience,” he told me some years ago, explaining how he would rather “sit back and enjoy the artistry of others” than perform himself. Indeed, that desire did not go unrequited. Days before his death and an hour before their Fort Worth recital,  Joshua Bell  and his piano accompanist Sam Haywood visited Cliburn at his home near the Bass Performance Hall, knowing the end was near.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Christopher Smith
Van Cliburn, the world-famous pianist who died Wednesday, made several appearances in Los Angeles through the years, including one unforgettable night at the Hollywood Bowl. A 1994 appearance at the Bowl tied to the World Cup soccer final and leading into the pianist's 60 th birthday was a confusing shambles in front of 14,000-plus audience members. The July 11 program promised to be an exciting pairing of two taxing pieces, Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto and Rachmaninoff's Third Concerto -- vehicles that had put Cliburn on the map in 1958.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
Van Cliburn, a little-known pianist who in 1958 dazzled the music world by winning an international piano competition in Moscow,  died Wednesday of bone cancer at his home in Fort Worth, Texas, said his publicist, Mary Lou Falcone. A child prodigy, Cliburn was taught by his pianist mother until he entered Juilliard School of Music in New York in 1951 at age 17. Three years later he won the prestigious Leventritt international competition, which earned him solo engagements with several orchestras.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Van Cliburn was a pianist, of course. He will be remembered for that big technique, big physique and big Texan heart, all of which contributed to making him such a sensation when he played. But Cliburn, who died Wednesday at 78, may be remembered most for being a phenomenon. He was the right young Texan with the right big technique at the right time to make music and cultural history. To the Russians, whom he wowed in 1958 in his famous win in the first Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow, Cliburn was exotic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
After a tense decade of air raid sirens, duck-and-cover drills and fears of Soviet superiority, hope for America came in an unlikely form in the late 1950s: a lanky, 23-year-old Texan with a head full of curls and huge hands that ranged across a piano keyboard with virtuosic power. With his transcendent performances of Tchaikovsky's First and Rachmaninoff's Third piano concertos, Van Cliburn brought 1,500 Russians to their feet in a Moscow concert hall. Declared the victor of the first International Tchaikovsky Competition, the young American became a hero of the Cold War era and an object of adoration around the world, whose fame helped bring classical music to the masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
To pianist Alexei Sultanov, equivocation is an unknown state of mind. When the 19-year-old Soviet won the gold medal in this year's Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in Fort Worth, he modestly stated, "I came here with one object only: to take top prize or nothing." The flashy, self-confident pianist from Tashkent (Uzbeck, U.S.S.R.) will perform a solo recital Tuesday at San Diego's College Avenue Baptist Church as part of the current Soviet arts festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Despite the lightheadedness that caused Van Cliburn to interrupt his concert Monday night at the Hollywood Bowl, a spokeswoman for the pianist said Tuesday that he is in good health and will continue his 16-city United States tour with the Moscow Philharmonic as planned. Cliburn's Los Angeles performance was the first official appearance on a comeback tour after going into retirement in 1978. The pianist also performed in a preview concert Saturday in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Texas-based Van Cliburn Foundation -- which promotes classical music through concerts, educational programs and competitions -- on Tuesday announced the 30 musicians, ages 19-30, selected to participate in the 14th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. Collectively, they represent 12 countries, including eight from the United States, six from Italy, four from Russia, three from China and two from the Ukraine, as well as Australia, Chile, France, Japan, South Korea, Poland and Taiwan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
After a tense decade of air raid sirens, duck-and-cover drills and fears of Soviet superiority, hope for America came in an unlikely form in the late 1950s: a lanky, 23-year-old Texan with a head full of curls and huge hands that ranged across a piano keyboard with virtuosic power. With his transcendent performances of Tchaikovsky's First and Rachmaninoff's Third piano concertos, Van Cliburn brought 1,500 Russians to their feet in a Moscow concert hall. Declared the victor of the first International Tchaikovsky Competition, the young American became a hero of the Cold War era and an object of adoration around the world, whose fame helped bring classical music to the masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By David Ng
Van Cliburn, the lanky Texan pianist who died Wednesday at 78, was an unofficial cultural ambassador for the United States during much of the Cold War. His win at the 1958 International Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow made him a beloved musical figure both in the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. OBIT: Van Cliburn, pianist who gave U.S. a Cold War victory, dies at 78 In the above video created by the musician's foundation, Cliburn is shown performing in Moscow to appreciative audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
Van Cliburn, a little-known pianist who in 1958 dazzled the music world by winning an international piano competition in Moscow,  died Wednesday of bone cancer at his home in Fort Worth, Texas, said his publicist, Mary Lou Falcone. A child prodigy, Cliburn was taught by his pianist mother until he entered Juilliard School of Music in New York in 1951 at age 17. Three years later he won the prestigious Leventritt international competition, which earned him solo engagements with several orchestras.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Van Cliburn was a pianist, of course. He will be remembered for that big technique, big physique and big Texan heart, all of which contributed to making him such a sensation when he played. But Cliburn, who died Wednesday at 78, may be remembered most for being a phenomenon. He was the right young Texan with the right big technique at the right time to make music and cultural history. To the Russians, whom he wowed in 1958 in his famous win in the first Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow, Cliburn was exotic.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Christopher Smith
Van Cliburn, the world-famous pianist who died Wednesday, made several appearances in Los Angeles through the years, including one unforgettable night at the Hollywood Bowl. A 1994 appearance at the Bowl tied to the World Cup soccer final and leading into the pianist's 60 th birthday was a confusing shambles in front of 14,000-plus audience members. The July 11 program promised to be an exciting pairing of two taxing pieces, Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto and Rachmaninoff's Third Concerto -- vehicles that had put Cliburn on the map in 1958.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Playing at the second stop of an expected 17-concert tour of the United States with the Moscow Philharmonic, American pianist Van Cliburn will appear July 11 as the opening event of a week of cultural events at the Hollywood Bowl to coincide with the World Cup. The 59-year-old pianist, appearing relaxed and genial, came to the Bowl Wednesday to formally announce the event. Vassily Sinaisky, music director of the Moscow Philharmonic since 1991, will conduct all concerts on the tour.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
Rildia Bee O'Bryan Cliburn, 97, the mother and early piano teacher of virtuoso pianist Van Cliburn. Her stroke last week caused Van Cliburn to interrupt his first concert tour in 16 years, which began in Los Angeles on July 11. He performed a scheduled concert at New York's Metropolitan Opera House, then flew back to Texas on Tuesday night when his mother's condition worsened. Mrs. Cliburn, an accomplished pianist, taught her son until he entered the Juilliard School in his late teens.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Chris Barton
The only classical pianist who has received a ticker-tape parade in New York City, Van Cliburn has announced through his publicist that he has been diagnosed with advanced bone cancer. Raised in Texas and educated at Juilliard, Harvey Lavan "Van" Cliburn earned global fame at age 23 when he won the first International Tchaikovsky Piano Competition in Moscow in 1958, which occurred at the height of the Cold War. Cliburn performed Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 and Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1, and his later recording of the latter was the first classical recording to sell 1 million copies and eventually went triple-platinum (Movement III of the song is shown above, taken from a performance when Cliburn returned to Russia in 1962)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A collection of treasures from pianist Van Cliburn brought in $4.3 million at a New York City auction. More than 150 items that Cliburn collected as mementos while playing concerts around the world -- including Russian art, English furnishings, jewelry and silver -- went on the Christie's auction block Thursday. The sale's premier piece was a pair of George II giltwood mirrors attributed to Mathias Lock -- expected to fetch between $150,000 and $250,000 -- sold for $460,000.
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