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Van Cliburn

ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When she was a schoolgirl in Armenia, Nazeli Atayan Rohman-Flynn went to hear a young American named Van Cliburn play the piano in her hometown of Yerevan two years after he caused a sensation by winning the first International Tchaikovsky Competition in 1958. "It was incredible," she says. "Everybody was in love with him. All my life I remember his performances when he got the first prize in Moscow, and then in Yerevan. " A half-century later, Atayan Rohman-Flynn, now a 62-year-old Pasadena homemaker, is in the midst of what she calls "another incredible experience.
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HOME & GARDEN
November 7, 2009 | Ariel Swartley
The way we listen to music has changed dramatically in the last 15 years -- earbuds instead of headphones, digital tracks instead of cuts on vinyl. But the basic design of an audio speaker, says Eric Sunda of Orange County Speaker, is the same as it was a century ago. Occupying a low, white 8,000-square-foot building in Garden Grove, the Sunda family business -- OCS for short -- operates on hundreds of ailing speakers a year. They're sent or brought from all parts of the country, and the senders include theaters, DJs, casinos, cruise ships, theme parks and heavy-metal guitarists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
There was a time, half a century ago, when a certain classical music competition meant more than just another young speed demon trying to wow a fractious group of judges. A lot more. It was the spring of 1958. Many Americans were still reeling from the launch of Sputnik only months before, wondering if the nation was losing its edge over the Soviet Union. Against this tense background came word of a new contest in the U.S.S.R. named after Russia's most famous composer, Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No longer gangly, but still boyish, Van Cliburn at 67 remains the charming pianistic icon from Texas, justifiably famous for his smile, his personal magnetism, his Romantic repertory, the major international piano competition he founded in 1962 and his unofficial ambassadorship of all things musically American.
NEWS
February 21, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are many great living performers in the classical music world, some of whom have broken through the barrier that separates the rarefied classical scene from general public acclaim. But few can boast the name cachet or enigmatic intrigue of Van Cliburn, who performs with the New West Symphony on Friday, after postponing his original appearance here in the post-traumatic days of September. It's fair to say it will be a highlight of the season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The New West Symphony has decided to postpone its season-opening concert, which was to be held Saturday in Thousand Oaks, after guest pianist Van Cliburn canceled his much-anticipated appearance. Tickets are not being refunded at this time. Instead, the symphony is planning the concert for a later date.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2001 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Braving the elements of an outdoor venue to make a Southland debut may not have been the most auspicious of introductions. But the impressive pianist Olga Kern made the most of her solo spot in the Pacific Symphony Orchestra concert Saturday at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in Irvine.
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