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Van Doren Rubber Co

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BUSINESS
March 11, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Paul Van Doren thinks leveraged buyouts are as American as hot dogs, apple pie and sneakers. In fact, he was pleased when Van Doren Rubber Co., the Orange-based tennis shoe company that he founded 23 years ago, was taken over in a leveraged buyout arranged by McCown De Leeuw & Co., a San Francisco venture-banking firm. In Van Doren's view, LBOs don't deserve the black eye they have received in recent years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
James Van Doren and his older brother Paul had only sample sneakers to offer when they opened their first store, in Anaheim, in 1966. They took a dozen orders in the morning and delivered custom canvas deck shoes, made in their adjacent factory, in the afternoon. Operating as the Van Doren Rubber Co., the brothers and two other co-founders planned to succeed by cutting out the middleman and selling their distinctive thick rubber-soled shoes directly to the public. By the early 1970s, the company owed some of its success to Southern California's burgeoning skateboard culture.
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BUSINESS
January 7, 1991 | From United Press International
Athletic Shoe Firms File Suit Over Knockoffs: The makers of Reebok, Converse and Vans shoes filed separate suits against distributors that are allegedly wholesaling illegal knockoffs of the popular footwear lines. The suits maintain that McAllen, Tex.-based Ridgewood Investments, Chatex International and Cosmo Trading Corp. are selling the sport shoes in Los Angeles, among other places. Reebok International, Converse Inc. and Van Doren Rubber Co.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1991 | From United Press International
Athletic Shoe Firms File Suit Over Knockoffs: The makers of Reebok, Converse and Vans shoes filed separate suits against distributors that are allegedly wholesaling illegal knockoffs of the popular footwear lines. The suits maintain that McAllen, Tex.-based Ridgewood Investments, Chatex International and Cosmo Trading Corp. are selling the sport shoes in Los Angeles, among other places. Reebok International, Converse Inc. and Van Doren Rubber Co.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1990 | Mary Ann Galante, Times staff writer
If the Van Doren Rubber Co. has its way, Vans Shoes will be stepping out--and making tracks all over the country. The Orange-based maker of the canvas sneakers made popular in the movie "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," has big plans to double its current annual sales of $60 million by May, 1992, said Jerry Gross, executive vice president at Van Doren. To do that, Van Doren is gearing up for a national expansion of Vans Shoes, its line of classic and custom tennis shoes.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. Customs officials in Arizona called Van Doren Rubber Co. last August to notify the company that a shipment of counterfeit Vans athletic shoes had been seized, officials at the Orange-based company were not surprised. Not only did the company know its goods were being counterfeited, it had already joined forces with two competitors--Reebok and Converse--in an unprecedented joint investigation to find out who was responsible.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen people from South Korea, the United States and Mexico were charged by a federal grand jury with engaging in a worldwide conspiracy to market counterfeit merchandise, including millions of pairs of athletic shoes bearing such trendy labels as Nike, Reebok, L.A. Gear and Converse, authorities announced Friday. The government investigation, coordinated by federal prosecutors in Arizona and the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
James Van Doren and his older brother Paul had only sample sneakers to offer when they opened their first store, in Anaheim, in 1966. They took a dozen orders in the morning and delivered custom canvas deck shoes, made in their adjacent factory, in the afternoon. Operating as the Van Doren Rubber Co., the brothers and two other co-founders planned to succeed by cutting out the middleman and selling their distinctive thick rubber-soled shoes directly to the public. By the early 1970s, the company owed some of its success to Southern California's burgeoning skateboard culture.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991
The Vans factory in Orange is a colorful sea of sneakers. The factory's 2,000 workers stitch up 4.5 million pairs a year, of which about 40% involve custom orders. Despite the complexity of shoemaking, the company's mass production techniques have cut the actual direct labor time to make a pair of sneakers to about 35 minutes. "The key to our factory is that we have a very skilled and special work force," said company President Richard Leeuwenberg. Founded in 1966 as the Van Doren Rubber Co.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1990 | Mary Ann Galante, Times staff writer
If the Van Doren Rubber Co. has its way, Vans Shoes will be stepping out--and making tracks all over the country. The Orange-based maker of the canvas sneakers made popular in the movie "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," has big plans to double its current annual sales of $60 million by May, 1992, said Jerry Gross, executive vice president at Van Doren. To do that, Van Doren is gearing up for a national expansion of Vans Shoes, its line of classic and custom tennis shoes.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. Customs officials in Arizona called Van Doren Rubber Co. last August to notify the company that a shipment of counterfeit Vans athletic shoes had been seized, officials at the Orange-based company were not surprised. Not only did the company know its goods were being counterfeited, it had already joined forces with two competitors--Reebok and Converse--in an unprecedented joint investigation to find out who was responsible.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen people from South Korea, the United States and Mexico were charged by a federal grand jury with engaging in a worldwide conspiracy to market counterfeit merchandise, including millions of pairs of athletic shoes bearing such trendy labels as Nike, Reebok, L.A. Gear and Converse, authorities announced Friday. The government investigation, coordinated by federal prosecutors in Arizona and the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Paul Van Doren thinks leveraged buyouts are as American as hot dogs, apple pie and sneakers. In fact, he was pleased when Van Doren Rubber Co., the Orange-based tennis shoe company that he founded 23 years ago, was taken over in a leveraged buyout arranged by McCown De Leeuw & Co., a San Francisco venture-banking firm. In Van Doren's view, LBOs don't deserve the black eye they have received in recent years.
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