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Van Gogh Museum

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NEWS
April 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT least 10 paintings were stolen from the Vincent Van Gogh Museum by robbers who took two guards hostage, Amsterdam police said. The exact number, identities and values of the works were not immediately known pending an inventory, but it is likely that works by Van Gogh--the Netherlands' most famous painter--are among them. The museum houses more than 100 of the 19th Century Impressionist's works, including "The Potato Eaters," his depiction of rural Dutch poverty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Coming soon to an art fair near you: 3-D reproductions of Vincent Van Gogh paintings. Introductory price: $35,000 a pop (limited time only). Horror and shame: The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is authorizing this junk. Through the transom Thursday came a news release from a Hollywood public relations firm trumpeting the imminent U.S. launch of -- wait for it -- “Reliefographs,” which are claimed to capture all the textured, painterly bravura of a real Van Gogh masterpiece.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This autumn, in a high-security operation that is shrouded in deepest secrecy, a shipment will depart from a four-story building of oatmeal-colored brick here, bound for Washington, D.C., and then Los Angeles. The people who work at 7 Paulus Potterstraat are too worried about what might happen to the priceless cargo to reveal exactly when it will be dispatched--or even whether it will go by air or by sea. It's simply too dangerous, they explain. Vincent van Gogh is going to America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By David Ng
A newly identified landscape painting believed to have been created by Vincent Van Gogh in 1888, just two years before his death, was unveiled Monday by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. "Sunset at Montmajour" depicts a wooded area near Arles in the south of France. The museum said that the work dates from around the same period that Van Gogh created his famous "Sunflowers" painting. The museum said it has spent two years authenticating the piece, using historic records, X-ray analysis and other techniques.  ART: Can you guess the high price?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2003 | From Reuters
The auction of a newly discovered Van Gogh painting thought to be worth a small fortune has been postponed so experts from Amsterdam's Van Gogh Museum can check its authenticity. The small town of Portets in southwestern France had been braced for a flood of visitors today, the day initially set to auction the painting of field workers bought at a flea market 12 years ago for $1,837.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008 | From Reuters
A sketchbook believed to have been Vincent van Gogh's, containing portraits similar to those in his most famous works, has been found in Greece, its owner said Wednesday. Taken by a Greek resistance fighter from a Nazi train, the sketchbook was discovered in storage boxes by his daughter, Greek writer Doreta Peppa, who is seeking to establish its authenticity with the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. One art expert commissioned by Peppa concluded that the sketches were by the 19th century Dutch Postimpressionist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1991
From my experience, I find Holo dead wrong in her belief that color reproductions of great art discourage us from viewing the "once-onliness" of the real thing. My husband and I have traveled many miles to see and "swoon" at the real thing, Simone Martini's "The Annunciation" at the Uffizi, Florence; Van Gogh's "Irises" at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam; "The Old Philosopher" of Rembrandt in the Louvre, all of which we had seen first in art-book reproductions. It was these that stirred us to seek out the originals, which, of course, satisfy the soul as no reproduction can. PEGGY AYLSWORTH LEVINE Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
An unsigned painting of a peasant woman, valued at $83 just days ago by a Japanese art house, has been identified as a previously unknown work by Vincent van Gogh. Shinwa Art Auction says the oil painting, a dark profile of a frowning middle-aged woman in a white bonnet, is now worth at least $25,000. The piece was deemed a Van Gogh on Thursday by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, two days before it was scheduled to be auctioned in Tokyo.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A new Van Gogh painting! "Sunset at Montmajour" was unwrapped Monday at a museum that is tooting its own horn, loudly.  It's a rarity, said the director of the Van Gogh Museum. Historic. Once in a lifetime. "A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred" at the Amsterdam museum, said Alex Reuger.  So, what's it worth? Paintings by Vincent Van Gogh are among the most valuable in the world. And this one was ambitious by Van Gogh's standards, Reuger said, given the canvas size, about 3 feet by 2 1/2 feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2004 | From Associated Press
The forehead, the shape and size of the eyes, even individual hairs matched up, making forensic scientist Albert Harper sure he had discovered an original photograph of famed artist Vincent van Gogh. The photograph, which dates to 1886 and was found in the early 1990s at an antique dealer, bears a striking resemblance to Van Gogh's self-portraits, said Harper, director of the Henry Lee Institute of Forensic Science.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A new Van Gogh painting! "Sunset at Montmajour" was unwrapped Monday at a museum that is tooting its own horn, loudly.  It's a rarity, said the director of the Van Gogh Museum. Historic. Once in a lifetime. "A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred" at the Amsterdam museum, said Alex Reuger.  So, what's it worth? Paintings by Vincent Van Gogh are among the most valuable in the world. And this one was ambitious by Van Gogh's standards, Reuger said, given the canvas size, about 3 feet by 2 1/2 feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Marcia Adair
AMSTERDAM - A scrum of international TV reporters, photographers and other media packed the Gallery of Honor at the Rijksmuseum on a recent spring morning, while producers negotiated with publicists for time to shoot spots in front of Rembrandt's 1642 painting "The Night Watch," the museum's crown jewel. After 10 years of renovation at a cost of almost $500 million, the Netherlands' national museum of history, art and culture was finally ready to greet its public. From the outside, the museum is an imposing presence at the north end of Amsterdam's Museum Plaza, which is also home to the Van Gogh Museum and the Stedelijk Museum, which unveiled an addition last year.
TRAVEL
February 17, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
Here, in alphabetical order, are 10 places I'd like to see in 2013. Several are cities, one is a state, three are entire nations, and all have interesting things happening in the weeks and months ahead. Will I get to them all? Probably not. But if I did, in alphabetical order, come December, I'd be able to swagger into some stylish Seoul watering hole, possibly limping slightly from a sled-dog mishap under the northern lights, but gamely standing rounds and spinning yarns of Ecuadorean trainspotting and what I learned from the reenactors at Gettysburg, Pa. Would you listen?
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Chris Barton
This post has been updated. See below for details. In an undertaking that seemed tailor-made for a complicated heist film, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam began taking down its collection of masterpieces Sunday night and prepared to transfer them to the Hermitage in Amsterdam. While the image of 75 Van Gogh paintings including "Sunflowers" and "Irises" crossing the city in an armored car could make an art thief's heart go pitter-pat, museum director Axel Ruger downplayed the effort as the museum prepares to close until April of next year for renovations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Van Gogh The Life Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith Random House: 953 pp., $40 Vincent Van Gogh is an extraordinary artist about whom everything seems to be known. His brilliant work and tragic life, combined with a paper trail of letters to his art-dealer brother, Theo, have made him an irresistible subject for art historians, biographers, journalists, filmmakers, medical specialists and psychologists since his death from a gunshot wound in 1890. The Dutch painter of dazzling landscapes and searing portraits may be permanently engraved in the public imagination as a mad, self-destructive genius, but scholars continue to probe every last detail of his 37 years on Earth.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Susan James, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum, a popular tourist destination in Europe , and home to some of the world’s best-known paintings, will shut down next year, in October, and remain closed until March 2013 for renovation and security upgrades, officials say. To provide continued access to the core collection, a selection of 75 paintings and several works on paper will be exhibited at the Hermitage Amsterdam during the closure. The Van Gogh Museum, which is visited by about 1.5 million people each year,  has been victimized in the past by art thieves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1999
As an avant-garde artist, Vincent van Gogh never enjoyed broad acceptance in his time: He sold only one of his paintings. Toward the end of his life, thanks to the support of his brother, some fellow artists and a handful of visionary critics, the Dutch-born painter was able to put together major works for exhibitions in Paris and Brussels.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By David Ng
A newly identified landscape painting believed to have been created by Vincent Van Gogh in 1888, just two years before his death, was unveiled Monday by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. "Sunset at Montmajour" depicts a wooded area near Arles in the south of France. The museum said that the work dates from around the same period that Van Gogh created his famous "Sunflowers" painting. The museum said it has spent two years authenticating the piece, using historic records, X-ray analysis and other techniques.  ART: Can you guess the high price?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Stedelijk Museum has a long-standing reputation in the art world for innovation. That spirit was underscored with the 2009 choice of an American as its new director: Ann Goldstein, who was then a senior curator at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art. Goldstein was excited by the notion of presiding over the reopening of the country's most important museum of modern and contemporary art, which had been closed for renovations since 2003. Because of delays due to governmental bureaucracy, funding issues and construction problems, the museum had presented exhibitions in satellite locations around Amsterdam between 2004 and 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2008 | Associated Press
Two portraits whose authenticity was in doubt have been verified as real Van Goghs, the museum named for the Dutch master confirmed Friday. One portrait is the face and torso of a woman in a hat. In the second, a lady sits with gloved hands folded in her lap. Because the themes were so common in the 19th century and the paintings had little similarity to the rest of the work by Vincent van Gogh, their authorship was in doubt, said spokeswoman Natalie...
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