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Van Kamp Seafood Co

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Edney was there 40 years ago when America's tuna canning industry came of age on Terminal Island. And in its own way, he says, the gritty industrial heart of Los Angeles Harbor was every bit as important as New York's Ellis Island to the immigrants who found work in the canneries. Every day for decades, he remembers, thousands of cannery workers would come to work on the ferries from San Pedro or by car across the Henry Ford Bridge.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Edney was there 40 years ago when America's tuna canning industry came of age on Terminal Island. And in its own way, he says, the gritty industrial heart of Los Angeles Harbor was every bit as important as New York's Ellis Island to the immigrants who found work in the canneries. Every day for decades, he remembers, thousands of cannery workers would come to work on the ferries from San Pedro or by car across the Henry Ford Bridge.
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NEWS
April 19, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL
August Felando is president of the American Tunaboat Assn. What no one seems to understand, complains 61-year-old August Felando, is that tuna fishermen love porpoises, too, and take no joy in killing them. "We have our own cult about the porpoise," said Felando, a third-generation fisherman. "We have drawings of them on our boats and each year we present the Golden Porpoise award to the skipper with the best record in saving porpoises while bringing in a good catch."
BUSINESS
November 29, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an angry parting of the ways, several environmental groups that have long lobbied for "dolphin-safe" tuna fishing methods plan to renew protests Friday against Bumble Bee Seafoods Inc. The groups claim that Bumble Bee's Thai parent company buys tuna caught in ways that harm the marine mammals, contrary to a promise Bumble Bee made last spring. Bumble Bee is one of three major U.S. tuna packers that announced in April that they would switch to buying only tuna caught in dolphin-safe ways.
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