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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years after the Northridge earthquake damaged Van Nuys City Hall, Los Angeles officials said Friday that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has finally approved $6.2 million needed to restore the historic structure. The city has accepted FEMA's offer of $4.9 million for reconstruction work and $1.3 million to relocate 160 city employees during the retrofit project, according to Paul Cauley, acting city administrative officer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years after the Northridge earthquake damaged Van Nuys City Hall, Los Angeles officials said Friday that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has finally approved $6.2 million needed to restore the historic structure. The city has accepted FEMA's offer of $4.9 million for reconstruction work and $1.3 million to relocate 160 city employees during the retrofit project, according to Paul Cauley, acting city administrative officer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A City Hall committee recommended Wednesday that Los Angeles go forward with the most ambitious of several options being considered for the Van Nuys Civic Center, a plan to build a $30-million municipal service center next to the old Valley City Hall building. The proposed 135,000-square-foot building would allow city offices now scattered through the San Fernando Valley to be united under one roof, and perhaps facilitate renovation of earthquake damage to the Van Nuys City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A City Hall committee recommended Wednesday that Los Angeles go forward with the most ambitious of several options being considered for the Van Nuys Civic Center, a plan to build a $30-million municipal service center next to the old Valley City Hall building. The proposed 135,000-square-foot building would allow city offices now scattered through the San Fernando Valley to be united under one roof, and perhaps facilitate renovation of earthquake damage to the Van Nuys City Hall.
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