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BUSINESS
April 11, 2006 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
To avoid a repeat of a strike that idled Canada's busiest port for five weeks last summer, officials in Vancouver have borrowed a strategy pioneered in Southern California: extending the hours that terminal gates are open. The idea is to keep truckers happy by reducing congestion so that drivers can make better money hauling even more steel containers crammed with imported goods. But so far, Vancouver has found the extended hours to be a tough sell.
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NEWS
March 27, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Demonstrators, hoteliers, tourism promoters, even visiting American patriots--anyone in this coastal city with something to gain from the upcoming U.S.-Russia summit--are holding their breath, hoping that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's Moscow troubles will not force a cancellation of the event, scheduled for next weekend. "It's going to be nip and tuck for (Yeltsin)," said Michael Lambert, general manager of the swanky downtown Hotel Vancouver.
SPORTS
February 19, 2010 | By Chris Kuc
In its inexorable march toward a showdown with Canada for the gold medal and supremacy in women's hockey, the United States has traveled a path of little resistance. Against Finland in its final preliminary-round game Thursday, the U.S. faced its biggest speed bump to date in a team that had also won its first two games of the tournament. The U.S. continued its smooth ride to the semifinals with a 6-0 victory over the Finns at UBC Thunderbird Arena in what was the Americans' toughest test, but in the end was another dominating performance.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
No need to clean your goggles or adjust your bindings -- that's America on top of the Olympic Alpine leaderboard. Austria? Well, word is the country is into baseball now. The United States of A-miracle went two-three in Friday's super-giant slalom at Whistler Mountain, climbing heights never before seen or contemplated. Heading into the 1994 Lillehammer Games, America's Alpine team was dubbed "Uncle Sam's left-footed snowplow brigade." Four Olympics later, America is just putting its foot down.
SPORTS
February 19, 2010 | Staff And Wire Reports
Security measures at the Olympics have been tightened in the wake of reports that a mentally ill man sneaked into last week's opening ceremony with a fake credential and was apprehended in the vicinity of Vice President Joe Biden . Officials here attempted to downplay the incident. "It's very clear to us that at no point was the vice president in danger," said Cpl. Darren Anderson , a spokesman for the Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit. "There was no indication that [the man]
SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
American Alpine star Lindsey Vonn finally made an official training run Monday, but her results were mixed. Nursing a sore shin she thought might keep her from competing in the Olympics, Vonn won the first half of a split downhill training run at Whistler Creekside, but victory came at a cost. "It's tough," she said. "I honestly was expecting it to be a little bit better than it was." Vonn, on her own, did some slalom training Sunday. Thomas Vonn said before Monday's men's downhill that his wife had suffered a "setback" but "it was to be expected."
SPORTS
June 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
Not a single arrest occurred in New York as fans celebrated the Rangers' victory over the Vancouver Canucks in the Stanley Cup finals. It was a different story in Vancouver, where rioting and looting left an estimated 200 people injured and more than 50 under arrest. Police said at least 21 face criminal charges. The most seriously injured was a 19-year-old who police earmarked as a ringleader of a group that started the trouble. Police fired a plastic bullet at the man, aiming for his chest.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Canadian cities of Vancouver and Toronto, and Auckland, New Zealand, have the highest quality of life for major world cities, according to a business survey. Cities at the bottom of the survey's rankings for quality of life were Brazzaville, Congo; Baghdad; and the Bosnian capital, Sarajevo.
SPORTS
February 26, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
The women's giant slalom was finally put to bed Thursday as Julia Mancuso tried to put a few rumors, and her emotional Olympic experience, to rest. Mancuso had no real shot at Whistler to defend her gold medal. Hope ended Wednesday when she finished 18th in her first run. Mancuso was flagged off course during her run and forced to restart after teammate Lindsey Vonn crashed in front of her. Poor weather postponed the second run to Thursday morning, which gave Mancuso time to transition from fuming to philosophical.
SPORTS
February 26, 2010 | By David Wharton
For the briefest moment, Bill Demong stood absolutely still, closing his eyes, exhaling. Only then did he step onto the highest part of the podium, the spot reserved for the winner. "I didn't expect to win the medal until it was over," he said. "I'm just starting to let it sink in a bit." Let it sink in that he had won gold in the large hill event of the Nordic combined at Whistler Olympic Park on Thursday. Let it sink in that his victory, along with a second-place finish by teammate Johnny Spillane, capped a historic two weeks for the U.S. in this obscure sport that combines ski jumping with cross-country skiing.
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