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February 21, 2010 | David Wharton
Dark clouds that lingered over the city last week have finally lifted, brighter days dawning on a Winter Games that needed some cheering up. "The morale is good," said Renee Smith-Valade, an official with the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. "The sun is shining and the sports are going well." Big crowds and big performances, not to mention solid television ratings, come as a big relief after a succession of bumps, glitches and worse that had organizers wondering what might go wrong next.
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SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
No need to clean your goggles or adjust your bindings -- that's America on top of the Olympic Alpine leaderboard. Austria? Well, word is the country is into baseball now. The United States of A-miracle went two-three in Friday's super-giant slalom at Whistler Mountain, climbing heights never before seen or contemplated. Heading into the 1994 Lillehammer Games, America's Alpine team was dubbed "Uncle Sam's left-footed snowplow brigade." Four Olympics later, America is just putting its foot down.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Chris Kuc
Just a few thousand meters separate Apolo Anton Ohno from making history. The Seattle native has six medals in his Olympic career, tying him with Bonnie Blair for most by an American in Winter Games history. Ohno can win No. 7 on Saturday night when he competes in the 1,000-meter event. "The 1,000 is a very tough race," said Ohno, a three-time Olympian. "The first round of the quarterfinals are going to be ridiculously stacked. They could be finals themselves." South Korean skaters Sung Si-Bak, Lee Ho-Suk and Lee Jung-Su, along with J.R. Celski of the U.S. and Charles Hamelin of Canada, figure to be formidable opponents for Ohno, who is a two-time Olympic medalist in the event (bronze in 2006 and silver in 2002)
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
It might be over-the-top dramatic -- like the launching-pad jump on the women's course known as "Hot Air" -- to suggest that Saturday's super-giant slalom at Whistler Creek will be Lindsey Vonn's last appearance of the Olympics. It would be conjecture to think that Vonn, once considered a five-medal threat, will bow out after the super-G, perhaps with her second gold, forgoing next week's giant slalom and slalom. The thinking: Why endure more excruciating pain from her bruised right shin in the two events in which see is least likely to win a medal?
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
Scrappy, physical Belarus came tantalizingly close to upending defending gold medalist Sweden and pulling off another Olympic hockey upset. Konstantin Zakharov clanged a shot off the crossbar about 12 minutes into the third period Friday shortly after his team had pulled to within a goal, and Andrei Stas forced goaltender Jonas Gustavsson to make a quick arm save on a desperate try to tie the score with 40 seconds left, triggering gasps...
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Candus Thomson
Amy Williams tamed the Whistler track over two nights to win the women's skeleton competition and become the first Winter Olympian in 30 years to earn a gold medal for Britain. However, Williams, who survived a protest Thursday by the U.S. team over the shape of her helmet, faces a second challenge from the Canadians, who also claim that the grooves -- spoilers -- do not conform to international-federation standards. The International Federation of Bobsleigh and Skeleton (FIBT)
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Philip Hersh
Will Russia's anger over Evgeni Plushenko's loss in the men's figure-skating competition have an effect on the ice dance results? That question will hang in the air until Monday, when the skaters do the free dance in an event that began with compulsories Friday. If world champions Oksana Domnina and Maxim Shabalin do not win, Russia will leave the Olympics without a skating gold medal for the first time since 1960, since its women won't even get near the podium. Even worse: A 12-Olympics win streak in pairs ended with a crash when no Russian team won a medal.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Philip Hersh
Evgeni Plushenko and his coach, Alexei Mishin, carped all week about men's skaters who do not attempt a quadruple jump, insisting such athletes are Neanderthals taking the sport back to the Pleistocene Epoch. Using that argument in their graceless derision of Evan Lysacek's Olympic victory, the first without a quad since 1994, the Russians missed the ironic truth that Plushenko was the outdated one. They figured Plushenko could win again by the rules that applied when he became Olympic champion in 2006, but the particulars in the way the sport is judged have changed substantially.
SPORTS
February 19, 2010 | By Chris Kuc
In its inexorable march toward a showdown with Canada for the gold medal and supremacy in women's hockey, the United States has traveled a path of little resistance. Against Finland in its final preliminary-round game Thursday, the U.S. faced its biggest speed bump to date in a team that had also won its first two games of the tournament. The U.S. continued its smooth ride to the semifinals with a 6-0 victory over the Finns at UBC Thunderbird Arena in what was the Americans' toughest test, but in the end was another dominating performance.
SPORTS
February 19, 2010 | Staff And Wire Reports
Security measures at the Olympics have been tightened in the wake of reports that a mentally ill man sneaked into last week's opening ceremony with a fake credential and was apprehended in the vicinity of Vice President Joe Biden . Officials here attempted to downplay the incident. "It's very clear to us that at no point was the vice president in danger," said Cpl. Darren Anderson , a spokesman for the Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit. "There was no indication that [the man]
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