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February 4, 1991 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Vancouver Canucks, arriving in Los Angeles aboard a commercial Canadian airliner Friday night to play the Kings, wound up as spectators to a disaster. The Canucks landed at Los Angeles International Airport just ahead of the USAir 737-300 that collided with a commuter plane after touching down, killing 33 people. The Canadian Pacific plane carrying the Canucks had just taxied off the adjacent runway when the collision occurred, affording the Canucks a full view of the tragedy.
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May 4, 2007 | Helene Elliott
Roberto Luongo stopped shots with his toes. The Vancouver Canucks' splendid goaltender, determined Thursday to prevent the Ducks from eliminating his team in Game 5 of the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs, repelled shots with his chest, his throat, his stick, his arms and, it sometimes seemed, with sheer will.
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SPORTS
October 5, 1998 | SCOTT MOE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a child in Los Angeles, Justin Morrison spent a lot of time on basketball courts. But after only his second time on skates, he knew his future was on ice. One weekend when he was 10, Morrison went ice skating with his cousin and a friend. He liked it enough to go back the next weekend. And after that second trip, he returned home with a surprising announcement. He told his parents he wanted to play hockey.
SPORTS
May 4, 2007 | Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writer
In a split second, on the unlikeliest of shots, a long night of frustration for the Ducks instantly turned into elation. Vancouver goalie Roberto Luongo had stopped nearly every kind of shot imaginable in more than 80 minutes Thursday night. But it was a long, unscreened shot from the blue line by Scott Niedermayer, a shot that Luongo usually eats up without much effort, that propelled the Ducks into the Western Conference finals.
SPORTS
December 8, 1999 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blame it on T.K. After all, he's the role model for his five children. Naturally, it would be his fault. T.K., short for Tetsuhiko Kariya, played rugby at the University of British Columbia, for club teams and for Canada in international competitions. It's difficult to imagine him not getting crunched by bigger players in the often violent scrums. As a young man, T.K. was fast and shrewd and, well, nobody really could catch him.
SPORTS
April 5, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was jeered and ridiculed, booed by unhappy Canuck fans and dissected by reporters every day. Felix Potvin was done, they said. He gave up too many soft goals. Even Brian Burke, the Canucks' general manager and one of Potvin's staunchest defenders, gave up on him and acquired Dan Cloutier from Tampa Bay. Why would the Kings think Potvin could solve their goaltending problems? "He was the best goalie on the market when we had a chance to get him," King Coach Andy Murray said.
SPORTS
April 28, 2007 | Helene Elliott
This was the worst-case scenario for the Ducks. The Vancouver Canucks, rejuvenated on Friday after resting for nearly two days, had the jump and verve they'd lacked when they lost the opening game of the teams' second-round playoff series at the Honda Center. Canucks goaltender Roberto Luongo, yanked before the end of Game 1, was brilliant in Game 2.
SPORTS
April 28, 2007 | Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writer
Sensing that his team had already been written off after the Ducks' Game 1 rout to open the Western Conference semifinals, Vancouver Coach Alain Vigneault struck a defiant tone following the Canucks' practice on Thursday. "Everybody is having this team out to be almost unbeatable," Vigneault told a group of assembled reporters. "We're going to step on the ice and try to prove differently." In Game 2, the Canucks did just that.
SPORTS
April 28, 2007 | Lonnie White and Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writers
On Friday, Vancouver played again without defensemen Sami Salo and Kevin Bieksa. Salo, who set a career high in goals (14) and points (37) during the regular season, sat out Game 1 after suffering a torso injury in the Canucks' first-round series against Dallas. He had hoped to play in Game 2. "The plan was to go out there and move around a bit. I feel a lot better," Salo said after Thursday's practice, which he started but could not finish. Salo could be available for Game 3 on Sunday.
SPORTS
April 25, 2007 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
After waiting nearly a week to learn who their next playoff opponent would be, the Ducks began preparing for Vancouver on Tuesday and the one name mentioned the most was Canucks goaltender Roberto Luongo. "He is a big guy with good mobility. With guys like that, you have to try and get in front of him and limit their opportunities to see the puck," Ducks defenseman Chris Pronger said of Luongo, 6 feet 3 and 205 pounds. "Traffic and getting to rebounds ... will be critical for us.
SPORTS
May 4, 2007 | Lonnie White and Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writer
The Ducks made a trade-deadline deal with Colorado for Brad May because they wanted his gritty play and playoff experience. But when the veteran forward was given a three-game suspension for punching out Minnesota defenseman Kim Johnsson in the first round, it wasn't clear that the Ducks would be able to benefit from May's postseason savvy. But since returning in Game 3 of the Ducks' best-of-seven series against Vancouver, May has been a hard-hitting force.
SPORTS
May 3, 2007 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
In a move aimed to have Teemu Selanne ready for tonight's Game 5 against Vancouver, Ducks Coach Randy Carlyle gave the veteran winger the day off Wednesday. It can only help, considering the bruising relationship Selanne has been having with hockey sticks and pucks. Selanne has helped lead the Ducks to a 3-1 edge over the Canucks in their best-of-seven Western Conference semifinal series. But the toll of these playoffs on Selanne's face hasn't been pretty.
SPORTS
May 2, 2007 | Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writer
Beaten to the punch much of the night by a gritty underdog Vancouver Canucks team desperate to even the Western Conference semifinals, the Ducks rose from the mat and landed a haymaker. Facing a two-goal deficit entering the third period Tuesday night, the Ducks' Chris Pronger and Teemu Selanne scored to stun a nervous sellout crowd at General Motors Place and Travis Moen hit the Canucks in the gut with the winner 2:07 into overtime for a 3-2 victory in Game 4.
SPORTS
May 2, 2007 | Helene Elliott
Ducks Coach Randy Carlyle doesn't like to spend much time in his team's locker room, firmly believing that it belongs to the players and should be regulated by the guys who skate and shoot, not by the coaches. But with the Ducks facing a two-goal deficit and an unfavorable tilt in the balance of their second-round playoff series against the Vancouver Canucks, Carlyle entered the visitors' room at GM Place after the second period Tuesday and made a simple request.
SPORTS
April 29, 2007 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
After winning five of their first seven playoff games, the Ducks find themselves in a tight spot heading into today's Game 3 at Vancouver in a Western Conference best-of-seven semifinal series. As a result of their 2-1, double-overtime loss in Game 2, the Ducks have given up home-ice advantage and need a strong effort to combat the resilient Canucks, who controlled the flow of the game better Friday than they did in Game 1 on Wednesday.
SPORTS
April 28, 2007 | Helene Elliott
This was the worst-case scenario for the Ducks. The Vancouver Canucks, rejuvenated on Friday after resting for nearly two days, had the jump and verve they'd lacked when they lost the opening game of the teams' second-round playoff series at the Honda Center. Canucks goaltender Roberto Luongo, yanked before the end of Game 1, was brilliant in Game 2.
SPORTS
May 2, 2007 | Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writer
Beaten to the punch much of the night by a gritty underdog Vancouver Canucks team desperate to even the Western Conference semifinals, the Ducks rose from the mat and landed a haymaker. Facing a two-goal deficit entering the third period Tuesday night, the Ducks' Chris Pronger and Teemu Selanne scored to stun a nervous sellout crowd at General Motors Place and Travis Moen hit the Canucks in the gut with the winner 2:07 into overtime for a 3-2 victory in Game 4.
SPORTS
May 2, 2007 | Helene Elliott
Ducks Coach Randy Carlyle doesn't like to spend much time in his team's locker room, firmly believing that it belongs to the players and should be regulated by the guys who skate and shoot, not by the coaches. But with the Ducks facing a two-goal deficit and an unfavorable tilt in the balance of their second-round playoff series against the Vancouver Canucks, Carlyle entered the visitors' room at GM Place after the second period Tuesday and made a simple request.
SPORTS
April 28, 2007 | Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writer
Sensing that his team had already been written off after the Ducks' Game 1 rout to open the Western Conference semifinals, Vancouver Coach Alain Vigneault struck a defiant tone following the Canucks' practice on Thursday. "Everybody is having this team out to be almost unbeatable," Vigneault told a group of assembled reporters. "We're going to step on the ice and try to prove differently." In Game 2, the Canucks did just that.
SPORTS
April 28, 2007 | Lonnie White and Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writers
On Friday, Vancouver played again without defensemen Sami Salo and Kevin Bieksa. Salo, who set a career high in goals (14) and points (37) during the regular season, sat out Game 1 after suffering a torso injury in the Canucks' first-round series against Dallas. He had hoped to play in Game 2. "The plan was to go out there and move around a bit. I feel a lot better," Salo said after Thursday's practice, which he started but could not finish. Salo could be available for Game 3 on Sunday.
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