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Vandalism Singapore

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NEWS
May 27, 1994 | Associated Press
A 15-year-old Malaysian youth accused of spray-painting cars along with American Michael Fay and other teen-agers on a rampage was released Thursday after paying a $390 fine. The youth, who cannot be named because of his age, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of fraudulent possession of four Mercedes-Benz car emblems. He originally faced two charges of vandalism, each punishable by a mandatory three strokes of a rattan cane. But prosecutors dropped those charges without explanation.
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NEWS
May 27, 1994 | Associated Press
A 15-year-old Malaysian youth accused of spray-painting cars along with American Michael Fay and other teen-agers on a rampage was released Thursday after paying a $390 fine. The youth, who cannot be named because of his age, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of fraudulent possession of four Mercedes-Benz car emblems. He originally faced two charges of vandalism, each punishable by a mandatory three strokes of a rattan cane. But prosecutors dropped those charges without explanation.
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NEWS
April 21, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
As American teen-ager Michael P. Fay pursues his final appeals to avoid a sentence of caning for vandalism in Singapore, Americans are divided evenly over whether he should suffer the punishment, The Times Poll found. In the survey, 49% said they approve of the sentence, which President Clinton has protested, while 48% disapprove of Singapore carrying it out. But poll respondents were much less willing to imagine using such punishment in America.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government here on Friday rejected U.S. criticism of a court's decision to sentence an Ohio teen-ager to be flogged for spray-painting cars, saying the country's tough laws have saved it from the fate of New York, "where vandalism is commonplace." The government also rejected foreign pleas for clemency for four foreigners who were sentenced to death for drug trafficking.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a cue from an internationally celebrated case in Singapore, an Orange County lawmaker is contemplating a bill to require the punishing of juvenile graffiti vandals with up to six whacks with a paddle. Assemblyman Mickey Conroy (R-Orange) said he began pursuing the idea--dismissed as ludicrous by legal scholars--after being prodded by constituents caught up in the highly publicized debate over the caning of an American teen-ager for spray-painting cars in Singapore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1994 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Inspired by the recent caning of Michael Fay, the American teen-ager convicted of graffiti vandalism in Singapore, Assemblyman Mickey Conroy (R-Orange) has authored a bill allowing judges to punish taggers by ordering them to be spanked with a wooden paddle. The bill was approved Tuesday by the Assembly Public Safety Committee and will now go on to a second committee hearing. It then will be voted on by the full Assembly floor and, if approved, will be sent to the Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994 | JEROME H. SKOLNICK, Jerome H. Skolnick is a professor of jurisprudence and social policy at UC Berkeley's School of Law and president of the American Society of Criminology.
When Michael Fay, an 18-year-old American, was sentenced to a "caning" for vandalism in Singapore, the initial reaction in this country was one of outrage; even President Clinton criticized the sentence as excessive and reportedly is seeking to have it withdrawn. But almost immediately, there was a backlash of Americans asking: If severe corporal punishment helps to maintain public order in Singapore, would it not be good policy here?
BUSINESS
June 13, 1994 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A T-shirt noticed recently in Singapore by Steve Craven, senior commercial officer at the U.S. Embassy, seemed to sum up a prevailing value in that trade-rich city-state. Starting with big letters at the top and repeating in descending rows of smaller and smaller type, it declared: "MONEY, money, money, money, money . . ."
OPINION
April 24, 1994 | ROBERT WEISBERG, Robert Weisberg is a law professor at Stanford University
These days, Americans seem to be driven mad by the fear of crime. Whether the public is influencing the politicians or vice versa, a perverse consensus is developing between voters and their elected leaders that we have reached such a catastrophic crisis that we must summon the courage to take extraordinary measures.
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