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Vandalism Southern California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1996 | Shawn Hubler
It was shortly after midnight when the dog began to bark. That should have been a clue, but we were slow. Also, two days before, she'd yapped at a hummingbird until she about passed out. So we didn't rouse ourselves right away. Not to sound defensive, but how were we to know? After so many years without incident, we'd gotten cocky--we thought we were immune. But in this, the Naked Suburb, no one is safe. So let this be a warning: Somehow, someday, someone will sneak up on you and . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1996 | Shawn Hubler
It was shortly after midnight when the dog began to bark. That should have been a clue, but we were slow. Also, two days before, she'd yapped at a hummingbird until she about passed out. So we didn't rouse ourselves right away. Not to sound defensive, but how were we to know? After so many years without incident, we'd gotten cocky--we thought we were immune. But in this, the Naked Suburb, no one is safe. So let this be a warning: Somehow, someday, someone will sneak up on you and . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992
Menacing razor wire being strung around Southern California freeway signs is aimed at keeping graffiti vandals at bay. "It wasn't our first choice," said Pat Reid of the California Department of Transportation. "But we get a lot of calls from people about the graffiti. They don't want us to look like New York City." Coiling wire around overhead freeway signs, at about $1,000 per sign, is "a last-ditch effort to protect the public's investment," Reid said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992
Menacing razor wire being strung around Southern California freeway signs is aimed at keeping graffiti vandals at bay. "It wasn't our first choice," said Pat Reid of the California Department of Transportation. "But we get a lot of calls from people about the graffiti. They don't want us to look like New York City." Coiling wire around overhead freeway signs, at about $1,000 per sign, is "a last-ditch effort to protect the public's investment," Reid said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2006 | Rebecca Trounson and Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writers
After an attempted firebombing near the home of one UCLA researcher and repeated harassment that pushed another professor to halt his primate research, UCLA's acting chancellor said Friday that he was taking steps to protect the university and its faculty from extremists in the animal rights movement.
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