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Vandalism

NEWS
May 21, 1987
In an effort to curb vandalism, particularly by teen-agers, the City Council Tuesday passed a resolution establishing rewards for information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone damaging city property. The reward system, which will take effect in mid-June, will pay tipsters $50 for information when the damage is estimated to be less than $500, and $100 when it is greater. The city will be reimbursed by the vandals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY
Even though vandals haven't been plaguing Irvine schools, the school board will adopt a policy to handle students caught damaging school property. Under the policy, parents in the Irvine Unified School District could be billed for vandalism caused by their students. The students could have their grades, diplomas and transcripts withheld if the damage isn't paid for. The policy merely puts into words the practice already in place among school officials, said Jerry Rayl, assistant to Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
A 74-year-old man dubbed the oldest vandalism suspect ever arrested by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department — after authorities said he put "slap tags" in Metropolitan Transportation Authority buses — pleaded no contest Thursday to misdemeanor vandalism. John Scott appeared in a downtown courtroom wearing a nylon Nike sweat suit and black loafers and carrying a vinyl Samsonite briefcase bearing his trademark orange and black bumper sticker that asks "Who is John Scott?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1991
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich on Tuesday asked the county Human Relations Commission to join in investigating the ransacking and burglary of a Sylmar house last week during which anti-Semitic symbols and remarks were scrawled on the walls. The vandalism ranged from bleach poured on carpeting to swastikas spray-painted on walls and posters and the word "Jew" painted on a bedroom mirror.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | LAURA MICHAELIS
Police arrested five Newport Harbor High School students Tuesday in connection with an incident in which tar, manure and spray paint were used to vandalize Corona del Mar High School. The five 17-year-old boys are suspected of painting lockers, damaging benches, and dumping tar and manure in the school quadrangle. Police say the words "N.H. No. 1" and some mild obscenities were painted with tar and oil on the ground and lockers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1998
Some 7,700 residents were left without electricity for a short time Saturday afternoon after a power station was damaged by vandalism, Department of Water and Power officials said. An iron bar was tossed into electrical equipment at a substation in the 9000 block of Van Nuys Boulevard about 1:15 p.m., DWP spokeswoman Treva Miller said. The bar caused several circuits to short out. Power to half the customers was restored within two minutes, Miller said. The rest had to wait until 2:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2007 | Jennifer Delson
Police are investigating the vandalism of a church as a potential hate crime. A swastika and satanic symbols such as the number 666 were found painted on classroom walls of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at 2225 N. Euclid St. last week. "These are red flags that indicate this could be a hate crime," Capt. John Petropulos said Tuesday. Church officials reported the incident Nov. 19, he said. Damage to the church was estimated at $40,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990
A Los Angeles Municipal Court judge on Friday postponed the "39th and Dalton" vandalism trial of four police officers for two weeks, at least until a new lawyer on the defense team can familiarize himself with the case. The postponement until Oct. 11 came one day after Judge Larry Paul Fidler removed James Wilson as the attorney for Capt. Thomas D. Elfmont.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | THOM MROZEK
Two men--one of whom was observed admiring his handiwork and the other a reputed member of a gang from Blythe Street in Panorama City--were convicted Monday of graffiti vandalism. In the first case, Hamid Ismail, a 19-year-old Woodland Hills man, pleaded no contest in Van Nuys Municipal Court to misdemeanor vandalism for using spray-paint to put the name of his tagging crew on a Japanese restaurant in the 17900 block of Ventura Boulevard in Encino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
A Jewish couple who found a swastika formed on their front lawn with a weed killer last month said they have been overwhelmed by sympathy shown by neighbors and strangers alike. "People have been very supportive," said Alvin Randall, who has lived in Rossmoor since 1953. "It was a very bad experience, but in some ways it brought something good."
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