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NEWS
October 12, 1989 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Money, money, money. And not a cent left. That's the bottom line to the Vanderbilt family saga, a financial fairy tale so bizarre it dwarfs the antics of modern Midases such as Malcolm Forbes and Donald Trump. "People who meet me think there has to be money lurking somewhere, a trust fund or some independent wealth," says Arthur T. Vanderbilt II, scion of Cornelius, once America's richest man. But those people are wrong, he says.
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NEWS
October 12, 1989 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Money, money, money. And not a cent left. That's the bottom line to the Vanderbilt family saga, a financial fairy tale so bizarre it dwarfs the antics of modern Midases such as Malcolm Forbes and Donald Trump. "People who meet me think there has to be money lurking somewhere, a trust fund or some independent wealth," says Arthur T. Vanderbilt II, scion of Cornelius, once America's richest man. But those people are wrong, he says.
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NEWS
October 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Police said Friday that they have no suspects and have found no signs of forced entry into the oceanfront mansion where Cornelius Vanderbilt III, distantly related to the 19th-Century railroad baron, was found stabbed to death. Vanderbilt, 72, had been dead a short time when his body was discovered in a first-floor hall Thursday by James Brunton, 37, who has shared Vanderbilt's home on Staten Island for five years, police Lt. William Quinn said. Vanderbilt headed Vanbro Construction Co.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Police said Friday that they have no suspects and have found no signs of forced entry into the oceanfront mansion where Cornelius Vanderbilt III, distantly related to the 19th-Century railroad baron, was found stabbed to death. Vanderbilt, 72, had been dead a short time when his body was discovered in a first-floor hall Thursday by James Brunton, 37, who has shared Vanderbilt's home on Staten Island for five years, police Lt. William Quinn said. Vanderbilt headed Vanbro Construction Co.
TRAVEL
August 16, 2011 | By Rosemary McClure, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Clint Eastwood knows how to set a scene on screen or at Mission Ranch, his strikingly handsome hotel and restaurant in Carmel. The hotel, a historic property, has a multimillion dollar view of the sea and beautiful grounds to match. Magenta bougainvillea spills from balconies, flowering pots decorate porches, huge cypress trees shade buildings and lawns. You'd expect a room to cost $500 a night or more. So how about $120 a night? Hard to believe, especially in a pricey tourist area like Carmel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2006
May 19, 1906: Sarah Bernhardt, the great French actress, concluded her Southern California tour, performing "La Tosca" at the Venice Auditorium. The Times reported that "as Floria Tosca, Madame Bernhardt puts forth her usual powers of intensity and emotional force" but added that the actress, then 61, lacked the "girlish spontaneity, physical vivaciousness and the youthful brilliance of voice that once was hers."
TRAVEL
November 19, 2010 | By Beverly Beyette, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Entering the Charlie Chaplin cottage, I stooped to avoid hitting my head. At 5 feet 8, I'm about 3 inches taller than Chaplin. (It's said the Little Tramp had the door made small so his guests would have to bow as they entered.) I was at the Charlie, an eccentric but charming West Hollywood hotel occupying a cluster of cottages where, it's also said, Gloria Swanson, Marilyn Monroe, Marlene Dietrich, Bette Davis and other screen luminaries once lived. They are among the famous for whom the cottages are named.
TRAVEL
April 5, 1987 | JUDITH MORGAN, Morgan, of La Jolla, is a nationally known magazine and newspaper writer
I felt springtime on my face as I walked uphill from the sea. The breeze was softer than it had been in months, the fragrance more sweet than tangy. The sun had tilted and risen above the rains of winter; the air was streaked with gold. Seasons are subtle on the Southern California coast. An evergreen shrub has popped into pale pink bloom. When a visitor from Georgia asked what it was, I was glad to be able to guess, with some confidence, India hawthorn.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I have some old Los Angeles Water Works bonds that date back to the 1930s. What might they be worth to collectors?--C.H. Answer: If you have a $1,000 Water Works bond that had a 4% return, colored blue, black and white, it recently was featured in a catalogue of scripophily for $25. Demand for old stocks and bonds appears to be growing. Some collectors are attracted to a certificate's artwork. In your case, there is a blue, black and white vignette of the City of Los Angeles seal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2003
NEW YORK -- Cody Franchetti believes it's ridiculous to feel guilty about having inherited wealth. Guilt is just an offshoot of a Puritanical culture, he claims, and should be reserved "for old women and nuns." Easy enough to say when you're handsome, cultured and one of the heirs to the Milliken textile fortune.
REAL ESTATE
April 19, 1987 | DIANE KANNER, Special to The Times: Kanner is a Los Feliz-based free-lance writer
A few years ago, when nonprofit organizations discovered what realtors had known all along, that people will go to any lengths to see how others live, the local "look-in" phenomena began. It nearly peaked in February when the Projects Council of the Museum of Contemporary Art asked $125 a person for an art and architecture tour.
TRAVEL
December 3, 1989 | BILL HUGHES, Hughes is a 30-year veteran travel writer living in Sherman Oaks
Grandtravel, the Maryland tour company that caters specifically to grandparents taking their grandchildren on trips, wants the two groups to go Dutch this summer . . . or hit the high and low spots of the Colorado Rockies. Grandparents still pick up the tab, but both age groups should enjoy a 12-day luxury hotel barge tour of "Holland's Waterways and Canals," which includes learning about the life of Van Gogh. The cruise, on the 18-passenger Juliana, lasts for six nights.
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