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Vanessa Beecroft

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
An Israeli man and a Palestinian woman fall in love in Berlin against the backdrop of the 2006 World Cup. A white trailer park mom from upstate New York teams with a Mohawk nation woman to smuggle illegal Chinese and Pakistani immigrants into the U.S. A half-Italian, half-English art star living in the states tries to adopt a pair of orphaned Sudanese twins.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
All the elements were in place for a by-the-numbers hip-hop album launch party. Flowing Champagne? Check. Well-heeled crowd of music industry grandees and boldfaced names? Check. Exclusive venue? Check. Gaggle of impossibly curvaceous naked women on display for all to ogle? Double check. Except this by-invitation-only "listening event" -- really, the first time multi-platinum-selling, Grammy-winning rapper-producer Kanye West's album "808s & Heartbreak" had ever been played in public -- deconstructed the very idea of what an album unveiling is supposed to be. With collaborator Vanessa Beecroft, he reassembled it all into something closer to the Renaissance artistic ideal of the sublime than any hip-hop-rooted pop offering has any right to be. Call it a listening party as social experiment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
All the elements were in place for a by-the-numbers hip-hop album launch party. Flowing Champagne? Check. Well-heeled crowd of music industry grandees and boldfaced names? Check. Exclusive venue? Check. Gaggle of impossibly curvaceous naked women on display for all to ogle? Double check. Except this by-invitation-only "listening event" -- really, the first time multi-platinum-selling, Grammy-winning rapper-producer Kanye West's album "808s & Heartbreak" had ever been played in public -- deconstructed the very idea of what an album unveiling is supposed to be. With collaborator Vanessa Beecroft, he reassembled it all into something closer to the Renaissance artistic ideal of the sublime than any hip-hop-rooted pop offering has any right to be. Call it a listening party as social experiment.
MAGAZINE
May 4, 2008 | CHARLES KOPPELMAN, Screenwriter and producer Charles Koppelman lives in Berkeley. Contact him at magazine@latimes.com.
Most of us have at least one story about laying eyes on someone and immediately falling in love. The ancient Greeks called it "theia mania," madness from the gods. Vanessa Beecroft's story of her life with Greg Durkin starts there, with a well-aimed arrow from Eros. She met her husband one night on a street in Brooklyn. In the dim light she could barely see him. "I got a little bit scared," she recalls. "This very tall shadow asked me about an apartment. I gave Greg my number and ran inside.
MAGAZINE
May 4, 2008 | CHARLES KOPPELMAN, Screenwriter and producer Charles Koppelman lives in Berkeley. Contact him at magazine@latimes.com.
Most of us have at least one story about laying eyes on someone and immediately falling in love. The ancient Greeks called it "theia mania," madness from the gods. Vanessa Beecroft's story of her life with Greg Durkin starts there, with a well-aimed arrow from Eros. She met her husband one night on a street in Brooklyn. In the dim light she could barely see him. "I got a little bit scared," she recalls. "This very tall shadow asked me about an apartment. I gave Greg my number and ran inside.
MAGAZINE
June 1, 2008
I found Charles Koppleman's story on Vanessa Beecroft ("A Work in Progress," May 4) very well-written. So well-written that if Beecroft read it as an outsider does, she would find the secret to herself: She is a selfish, spoiled, self-absorbed brat who has refused to grow up. Trying to adopt twins from another culture without consulting her husband is a move designed to wreck a marriage. Her lack of concern for her husband's opinion shows her to be cold and indifferent. She is not a "work in progress."
NEWS
March 20, 2001
Watching the expressions on visitors' faces at the Gagosian Gallery on Saturday night was almost as entertaining as the performance tableau they were there to see. About 100 onlookers lined the gallery walls, gazing intently at two dozen naked women. Some visitors laughed, others seemed embarrassed and a few looked a little shocked. New York artist Vanessa Beecroft assembled "VB46" using models wearing nothing more than wigs, shoes and white body paint.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Here's hoping that viewers have discovered "EGG the arts show," a scintillating half-hour magazine that KCET airs at 10:30 a.m. Sundays. Except when it includes nudity. An earlier episode featuring photographer Laura Aguilar's studies of herself in the nude was exiled to 12:30 a.m. and so, too, has an episode originally set to run last Sunday been bumped, this time to 11 tonight, which is nearer the occupied 10 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2003 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Before our current, enlightened age of child-rearing, parents driven to distraction by their offspring's whining were apt to threaten a grim proportionality: "You pipe down, or I'll give you something to cry about!" Kathryn Harrison, who burst into full frontal literary view with her fourth book, "The Kiss," an autobiographical account of a father-daughter affair, is certainly nobody's crybaby.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
After a year of seeing Nicole Kidman's prosthetically altered face staring out from magazine pages and billboards, confronting an actual photo of Virginia Woolf is a bit of a shock. Three years before Woolf's suicide, Gisele Freund took a portrait of the writer and it is included in "Women Seeing Women" a collection of photographs published in May by W.W. Norton. Even giving due credit to hindsight, it is almost breathtaking how this woman's face betrays her fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
An Israeli man and a Palestinian woman fall in love in Berlin against the backdrop of the 2006 World Cup. A white trailer park mom from upstate New York teams with a Mohawk nation woman to smuggle illegal Chinese and Pakistani immigrants into the U.S. A half-Italian, half-English art star living in the states tries to adopt a pair of orphaned Sudanese twins.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By August Brown
Last week, producer Hudson Mohawke - a centerpiece of Kanye West's extended crew and a producer on "Yeezus" - said something that almost no other producer peer was willing to. He thought the new Jay-Z album didn't sound all that exciting.  "This record could've came out 10 yrs ago n no one wouldve batted an eye lid," he wrote on Twitter . In a followup reply to the producer Mike Dean, he added: "Not negativity just honest opinion I think it's...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2005 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
Though common enough in today's increasingly global art market, a nationality-oriented group show like "China Avant Garde" at Arena 1 is a tricky thing to approach. China, to state the obvious, is a vast and complicated country.
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