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Vanilla Ice Cream

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FOOD
June 18, 2013
Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: 4 Note: From 25 Degrees in Hollywood. 1 quart half-and-half 1 vanilla bean, sliced lengthwise, seeds scraped 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 12 egg yolks 1. In a medium saucepan, heat the half-and-half with the vanilla bean and seeds over medium heat until just simmering. 2. In a large bowl, whisk the sugar and egg yolks until the mixture turns a pale lemon color. Slowly whisk the warm half-and-half into the egg yolk mixture.
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FOOD
June 18, 2013
Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: 4 Note: From 25 Degrees in Hollywood. 1 quart half-and-half 1 vanilla bean, sliced lengthwise, seeds scraped 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 12 egg yolks 1. In a medium saucepan, heat the half-and-half with the vanilla bean and seeds over medium heat until just simmering. 2. In a large bowl, whisk the sugar and egg yolks until the mixture turns a pale lemon color. Slowly whisk the warm half-and-half into the egg yolk mixture.
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NEWS
October 26, 1997 | LYNN SIMROSS
Three new scary scoops are out for Halloween at Baskin-Robbins. Guaranteed gloppy is Eerie Scream (named after Fox TV's kids show "Eerie, Indiana"), a combo of green and purple vanilla ice cream with a "bloody" strawberry ribbon running through it and white chocolate, strawberry-filled skulls buried throughout. Skullicious is tamer looking, featuring orange-colored vanilla ice cream with chocolate skulls encased in chocolate ice cream. Trick-Oreo-Treat has no skulls but plenty of sweets.
FOOD
June 9, 2012
  Total time: 10 minutes Servings: 1 cocktail Note: Adapted from Julian Cox of Short Order. Thin Mints can be substituted with a similar type of chocolate-mint cookie. 2 scoops chocolate ice cream 2 scoops vanilla ice cream 1 ounce Irish whisky, preferably Powers 1/2 ounce creme de menthe, preferably Tempus Fugit 1/2 ounce Fernet Branca-Menta 1 ounce crushed Thin Mints Chocolate sauce, for garnish Mint spring, for garnish Thin Mint, for garnish In a blender, blend the chocolate ice cream, vanilla ice cream, Irish whisky, creme de menthe, Fernet Branca-Menta and crushed Thin Mints.
FOOD
August 16, 1990
This dessert, Pineapple With Fudge Sauce, takes just minutes to prepare, with the help of the microwave oven. Ripe pineapple and creamy vanilla ice cream are drizzled with a dark, orange chocolate sauce. The sauce is made of semisweet chocolate pieces and orange liqueur. PINEAPPLE WITH FUDGE SAUCE 1 large pineapple 1 cup semisweet chocolate pieces 1/4 cup whipping cream 2 tablespoons orange liqueur 2 tablespoons orange juice 1 pint vanilla ice cream Twist crown from pineapple.
FOOD
June 9, 2012
  Total time: 10 minutes Servings: 1 cocktail Note: Adapted from Julian Cox of Short Order. Thin Mints can be substituted with a similar type of chocolate-mint cookie. 2 scoops chocolate ice cream 2 scoops vanilla ice cream 1 ounce Irish whisky, preferably Powers 1/2 ounce creme de menthe, preferably Tempus Fugit 1/2 ounce Fernet Branca-Menta 1 ounce crushed Thin Mints Chocolate sauce, for garnish Mint spring, for garnish Thin Mint, for garnish In a blender, blend the chocolate ice cream, vanilla ice cream, Irish whisky, creme de menthe, Fernet Branca-Menta and crushed Thin Mints.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2001 | JESSICA STRAND
Bite into one of these pastries, and you find a cool surprise: ice cream in nearly every mouthful. * Ammo: The ice cream sandwich here is two dark, crisp Valrhona chocolate cookies with a frozen filling. Depending on the day, that may be espresso gelato or mint ice cream. The espresso sandwich is surrounded by golden butterscotch, the mint version with creme de menthe. (Ice cream sandwich, $6.) Ammo, 1155 N. Highland Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 871-2666.
FOOD
March 1, 1990
Here are some soda fountain favorites that call for juicy strawberries. For Strawberry Shakes puree 1 pint strawberries in food processor or blender. Add 1 pint softened vanilla ice cream and blend until smooth. Freeze in container about 1 hour. Before serving, blend few seconds until smooth, then spoon into tall glasses and garnish with whole strawberries.
FOOD
November 9, 1989
Pumpkin Mousse Ice Cream Pie combines a holiday flavored mousse with vanilla ice cream and a gingersnap crust. The pie crust may be made ahead and refrigerated or frozen, wrapped tightly. Or, assemble the pie all at once and freeze up to 24 hours before serving. Final touch is a sauce of pumpkin and caramel or butterscotch. It may be warmed to add contrast to the cold pie, and served under or over each serving.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2001
What could be better than warm summer fruit bubbling under a biscuit or crumble topping? * 5 Dudley: The cobbler here is blackberries and cherries under a buttery hazelnut streusel, which gives it a rich, deep flavor. It's usually served warm with fresh vanilla ice cream, occasionally maple or some other lively flavor. (Blackberry and cherry cobbler with ice cream, $7.) 5 Dudley, 5 Dudley Ave., Venice, (310) 399-6678. * Paul's Cafe: This cobbler is big enough for two.
FOOD
January 19, 2012
Spiced apple cobbler crumble Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Servings: 8 Note: Adapted from Susan Dumeyer and David Sundeen of Windrose Farm. Regarding the apples, Dumeyer recommends "Granny Smith or Sierra Beauty for their firm, tart flavor. Calville Blanc d'Hiver would be another good apple. " 1 1/4 cups sugar, divided 3 cups (12.75 ounces) plus 2 tablespoons flour, divided 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon fresh nutmeg 6 cups peeled, cored and cubed apple (about 2¼ pounds, or 6 apples)
FOOD
May 20, 2009
Total time: 50 minutes, plus chilling and cooling time Servings: 6 Note: This crostata dough is adapted from one by Nancy Silverton of Mozza. Crostata dough 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 3/4 cup cake flour 3 tablespoons granulated sugar Dash of salt 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) cold butter, cut into pieces 2 tablespoons ice water 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. 2. In the bowl of an electric mixer or food processor, combine the all-purpose flour, cake flour, sugar and salt.
FOOD
June 18, 2008 | Emily Dwass, Special to The Times
WHEN IT comes to summer food, the more fun it is to make, the more fun it is to eat. The best ice cream ever just might be the stuff made by throwing around a ball -- yes, a plastic ball -- filled with cream, sugar and vanilla in one half and rock salt and ice in the other. The best pizza is made -- surprise! -- on the grill. The best evenly browned 10 marshmallows -- what, you didn't know you needed 10 matching roasted marshmallows? You haven't seen the Marshmallow Tree.
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | Charlie Amter, Times Staff Writer
FOR a guy who has yet to officially open his business in the U.S., the president of fledgling frozen yogurt company Red Mango is having a very good day. "We just installed a machine in Leonardo DiCaprio's office," Dan Kim says from the South Korea-based firm's office near LAX. "Now he wants a machine delivered to his temporary home in New York. Apparently, he heard about the rats at Pinkberry's New York store." Kim laughs at his own cheap shot.
FOOD
April 18, 2007 | Amy Scattergood, Times Staff Writer
IN revolutionary France, the newspaper Le Monde offered a reward for anyone who invented a method of preserving food for the hungry and impatient armies. If they were to offer a reward today for the person who figured out what to do with all those cans and jars the inventors came up with, Nancy Silverton would surely win it.
FOOD
June 14, 2006 | Amy Scattergood, Special to The Times
IT'S getting hotter -- and hotter, according to Al Gore. Time to turn up the AC, plan more trips to the beach, and grab yourself a seriously cool milkshake. A real shake, that is -- not the synthetic kind handed to you from an anonymous drive-thru window. A shake with fabulous ingredients, made on the spot just for you, and presented on a real counter instead of in a cardboard drink holder. And there are some fabulous counters serving shakes these days.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | CHRIS RUBIN, Special to The Times
July is National Ice Cream Month. We can thank Ronald Reagan, the jelly bean president, who made the declaration more than a dozen years ago. We Americans eat more than 1.5 billion gallons of the cold, sweet stuff annually. But just because it's ice cream doesn't mean it has to be frozen. You can enjoy yours in liquid form, with or without alcohol, in a slew of drinks and cocktails around town in which ice cream or sorbet is added for texture, flavor or just for the chill.
MAGAZINE
August 15, 1999 | Mary Melton
When you've got an $80-million payroll, you've got to trim fat wherever you can. And at 20 grams per serving, the Cool-a-Coo must have seemed an easy shave. This season, many longtime Dodger fans have dropped their jaws in disbelief upon forking over $2.50 to the roving ice cream vendor and receiving an It's It passed down the aisle. What the heck happened to Cool-a-Coo? For 27 years, L.A. fans scooped up an average of 4,000 of them a game.
FOOD
June 30, 2004 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
In some parts of the world, the most popular desserts are built on an ingredient that would disappear in a minute if you let it sit, and tastes like nothing when you put it in your mouth. Riddling aside, ice makes for some glacially great finales, and we don't mean snow cones. These desserts, many of which come from the steamy climes of Asia, but which also come from Mexico, can be architectural assemblies.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 2004 | DAVID LEITE, David Leite last wrote for the magazine about deep-dish French toast.
Perhaps it's my European ancestry or my predilection for the color green. But unlike the average American, I prefer a cone piled high with nut-studded pistachio gelato rather than serviceable vanilla ice cream. Not that I harbor any grudges against vanilla ice cream, mind you; in its most luscious form--French with tiny specks of seeds--it's quite enjoyable. For the most part, I find it best as a medium for mix-ins such as Oreos, Heath Bars and M&Ms.
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