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SCIENCE
April 9, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Before going incommunicado behind the Sun for a month, NASA's Mars Curiosity rover sent Earth evidence that the Red Planet has lost much of its original atmosphere. The findings, announced by Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientists at the European Geosciences Union meeting in Vienna, bolster the idea that the Martian atmosphere was once much thicker than it is today -- and come less than a month after the rover drilled its first rock and found signs that Mars was once hospitable to life . Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars instrument sniffed the Martian atmosphere and counted up the isotopes of argon in the air. Isotopes are heavier and lighter versions of the same element, and when a planet starts to lose its atmosphere, the lighter isotopes in the upper layers are the first to go. So if scientists see fewer of the lighter isotopes than expected, it might mean that there was once much more air there.
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BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Target has apologized for referring to its "plus-size kimono maxi dress" as manatee gray. This is a mammal, after all, that is sometimes referred to as a sea cow. An irritated shopper tweeted what many saw as an insult. Regular sizes were "dark heather gray," but the plus size got the "manatee" label.  It didn't take long for Target to zap the plus-size gaffe from its website and issue an apology. A spokeswoman told Today.com on Thursday the retailer was sorry for "any discomfort" and never intended to offend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Jack Leonard and Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
Defense attorneys for a man charged with the cold-case murder of his San Marino landlady's adult son wrapped up their case Wednesday by focusing on an enduring mystery in the nearly 30-year-old whodunit: What happened to the victim's wife? Christian Karl Gerhartsreiter's lawyers called only two witnesses in his defense: a pair of handwriting experts who testified that they were all but sure Linda Sohus was the person who wrote several postcards mailed to her friends and family weeks after she and her husband went missing in early 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
When Nathan Williams promises, "Still I'll be your dog," on the new album by his L.A. fuzz-punk band Wavves, he's nodding of course to "I Wanna Be Your Dog" by perhaps the greatest fuzz-punk band of them all, the Stooges. But Williams seems also to be invoking the memory of Mudhoney, the long-running Seattle outfit known to cover "I Wanna Be Your Dog"; its sludgy-but-sweet guitars are all over "Afraid of Heights," Wavves' fourth studio disc and their first to get a big major-label push.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Kate Mather and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Authorities late Wednesday were trying to unravel how a 10-year-old girl vanished from her Northridge bedroom in the middle of the night, then mysteriously reappeared with cuts and bruises half a day later and miles away. Police said they were looking for two men they believe were involved and have recovered a black pickup. The LAPD has nothing to connect the men to the girl in terms of previous contact, police sources said. "I've got a young lady that was abducted. I don't know the reason," said Los Angeles Police Department Capt.
NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Mike Wolfe of "American Pickers" addressed a Sunday morning audience at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show with some sobering advice on visiting small-town America: Go before it's all gone. "Please travel, experience, discover -- not just items and people but communities, because there are so many cool places," the star of the History Channel show said. In the series, Wolfe spends his time with cohort Frank Fritz crisscrossing tiny towns, rifling through barns and sheds in search of antique treasures.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
This winter, NBC has learned the hard way just how fleeting victory can be. The network had its best fall in years. The new prime-time lineup got a welcome push from the Summer Olympics in London. The post-apocalyptic drama "Revolution" was a surprise hit after "The Voice," the singing contest that has turned into NBC's main entertainment draw. NFL games reigned supreme on Sundays. Mired in fourth place for years, NBC suddenly found itself No. 1 - a position it hadn't regularly seen in nearly a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The first posthumous attack on John Pedro was a simple, senseless theft. At the roadside shrine that popped up where the California Highway Patrol officer was killed near Watsonville in 2002, someone stole a flag. "Some people hate the police," said Colleen Gilmartin, Pedro's widow and a former CHP officer herself. "I thought it was some kind of statement. " But the statements have grown more assertive and more bizarre in the 10 years since Pedro's cruiser slammed into a tree as he was pursuing a speeder.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
A series of bizarre turns in negotiations between the NHL and its players on Thursday extinguished the optimism generated during direct talks between players and owners early this week and put the league in position to lose a season for the second time since 2004. Commissioner Gary Bettman was red-faced and angry, and NHL Players' Assn. Executive Director Donald Fehr swiftly switched from declaring the sides were "close if not on top of one another" on major issues to saying he would tell fans, "It looks like this is not going to be resolved in the immediate future.
SPORTS
December 6, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
This, quite clearly, was a day (and night) to remember for those closely following NHL labor negotiations. Or forget. Thursday surpassed often perplexing talks with a surreal turn of events in New York. It started with an optimistic read on the negotiations from Donald Fehr, the executive director of the NHL Players Assn., with the veteran labor leader saying he felt the sides were close to a deal. But just as Fehr was addressing the media, the league, apparently, was leaving a voice mail for his brother, Steve Fehr, rejecting the players' latest offer.
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