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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Filmmaker Roman Polanski on Friday won his libel suit against Vanity Fair magazine over an article that accused him of propositioning a woman while on the way to the 1969 funeral of his murdered wife, Sharon Tate. The Academy Award-winning director was awarded the British equivalent of about $87,000 in damages plus court costs. The jury of nine men and three women took 4 1/2 hours to reach a unanimous verdict at London's High Court.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
The British phone hacking scandal continues to take its toll on News Corp. The media conglomerate on Wednesday reported a 5% drop in its fiscal first-quarter earnings. It incurred charges associated with shutting down its News of the World tabloid in London, which has been at the center of the scandal, and abandoning its bid to acquire 100% of satellite broadcaster British Sky Broadcasting. News Corp.'s financial disclosures come as a Vanity Fair magazine article — on newsstands Friday but released to media Wednesday — reveals how the hacking crisis has intensified a rift among members of the Murdoch family, which owns 12% of the company's shares but controls nearly 40% of their voting power.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1994 | ALAN CITRON
Good news for Company Town readers: Vanity Fair magazine says America's new powerbrokers are the very people who grace these pages. Not the reporters, unfortunately, but a select group of 19 Information Age leaders that Vanity Fair calls the "New Establishment." In its upcoming issue, the magazine makes the case that this roster has replaced the "small group of WASP men whose breeding grounds were the playing fields of prep schools" and who ended up in government, the law and on Wall Street.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Microsoft Corp. co-founder Paul Allen says Bill Gates, his onetime business partner, was a "mercenary" opportunist who schemed to lessen Allen's stake in the software company. Allen, now a venture capitalist in Seattle, says in his book "Idea Man: A Memoir by the Cofounder of Microsoft" that he learned of the plot while listening in on a conversation between Gates and Steve Ballmer in 1982, after he had been diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease. Gates is currently Microsoft chairman and Ballmer is chief executive.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the do-good decade, proclaims Vanity Fair magazine. And few are better placed to do it than Vanity Fair Editor in Chief Tina Brown. After six years at the helm, she is New York's priestess of glossy publishing, the turnaround artist who molded a tottering, year-old magazine into an upscale, high-profile monthly. (Circulation was 220,000 when she took over; it was 760,000 at last count, and advertising has tripled, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Less of Moore: Demi Moore may be perpetually pregnant on the Vanity Fair magazine covers floating around this month, but she is pregrant no more. Moore, 28, gave birth to her second daughter on Saturday at 4:35 a.m. The child's name was not immediately disclosed. Moore's and husband Bruce Willis' first child, Rumer, is nearly 3.
SPORTS
April 12, 1999
At the first Masters in 1934 1. Called "Augusta National Invitational Tournament" 2. Newspapers called it the "Masters Open" 3. Prize-money qualifiers were the top-12 finishers 4. Bobby Jones finished 13th 5. Club borrowed chairs from local funeral homes 6. Members wanted course open for own play in a.m. 7. Purse totaled $5,000-x x--Note: There was no purse until 17 club members made contributions * Source: "Vanity Fair Magazine" (David Owen, March 1999)
BUSINESS
May 11, 1993 | Associated Press
Ronald Galotti is out as publisher of Vanity Fair magazine and is being replaced by Kathy Neisloss Leventhal, the founding publisher of 2-year-old Allure magazine, Conde Nast Publications Inc. announced Monday. Galotti's departure after three years as publisher of Vanity Fair was unexpected. He had been viewed in magazine publishing circles as one of Conde Nast's rising stars. Conde Nast President Bernard Leser said Galotti had "resigned . . . to pursue other interests."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The 20 words that shook the record business are found near the end of Vanity Fair magazine's eight-page profile this month on rock provocateur Courtney Love. Talking about a day last January when her husband Kurt Cobain's band, Nirvana, appeared on "Saturday Night Live," the 26-year-old singer is quoted as saying, "Then, we got high and went to 'S.N.L.' After that, I did heroin for a couple of months." The shocker is that Love, the lead singer of the group Hole, was pregnant at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2008 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Founded in 1856, London's National Portrait Gallery is a place where the people in the pictures, not the pictures themselves, are what count. The museum's website explains: "The National Portrait Gallery was established with the criteria that the Gallery was to be about history, not about art, and about the status of the sitter, rather than the quality or character of a particular image considered as a work of art. This criterion is still used by the Gallery today."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
WHEN life handed British journalist Toby Young lemons, as the cliche goes, he made lemonade. Not just any lemonade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2008 | William Booth and Hank Stuever, Washington Post
Yoo-hoo, Mr. Landscaper! Cease trimming all that ficus into the letters V-A-N-I-T-Y F-A-I-R, please! Just shape what you've already done, into, oh, we don't know, a nice topiary of a hippo or a Dora the Explorer hedge, and we'll have it delivered to the sick children's wing at Cedars. Hello, In-N-Out? Yes, we need to cancel those 575 "animal style" burgers, pronto. Hello, we're trying to reach Portofino Potties? We have sad news about the loos. . . . People, we have party interruptus.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2006 | Robin Abcarian
The waiting game is over. The first public photographs of Suri Cruise will hit the newsstands today, when she appears with her parents, a couple of actors, on the cover of Vanity Fair. In addition to a 22-page photo portfolio, Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes talk about the strange experience of being the subjects of so much speculation and so many rumors and jokes, including much speculation about Holmes' pregnancy and why the baby was kept under wraps.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Conde Nast, the closely held magazine publisher owned by the Newhouse family, on Thursday named Louis Cona as publisher of the New Yorker magazine and Alan Katz as publisher of Vanity Fair. The changes were prompted by the company's announcement the day before that the New Yorker's previous publisher, David Carey, would become president of a new unit that will start a business magazine and website.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Filmmaker Roman Polanski on Friday won his libel suit against Vanity Fair magazine over an article that accused him of propositioning a woman while on the way to the 1969 funeral of his murdered wife, Sharon Tate. The Academy Award-winning director was awarded the British equivalent of about $87,000 in damages plus court costs. The jury of nine men and three women took 4 1/2 hours to reach a unanimous verdict at London's High Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2005 | Mike Collett-White, Reuters
Film director Roman Polanski is due to appear in a London libel case via video link from Paris next week, setting a legal precedent and avoiding the risk of extradition to the United States for a child sex offense. Polanski is being allowed to sue the British publishers of Vanity Fair magazine from a hotel room in Paris after England's highest court in February overturned an earlier ruling that would have forced him to come to London to fight his case.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2008 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Founded in 1856, London's National Portrait Gallery is a place where the people in the pictures, not the pictures themselves, are what count. The museum's website explains: "The National Portrait Gallery was established with the criteria that the Gallery was to be about history, not about art, and about the status of the sitter, rather than the quality or character of a particular image considered as a work of art. This criterion is still used by the Gallery today."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2005 | Mike Collett-White, Reuters
Film director Roman Polanski is due to appear in a London libel case via video link from Paris next week, setting a legal precedent and avoiding the risk of extradition to the United States for a child sex offense. Polanski is being allowed to sue the British publishers of Vanity Fair magazine from a hotel room in Paris after England's highest court in February overturned an earlier ruling that would have forced him to come to London to fight his case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Rep. Gary Condit (D-Ceres) has settled his $11-million defamation suit with Vanity Fair writer Dominick Dunne over claims the journalist made about Condit's role in the disappearance of intern Chandra Levy, his lawyer said Tuesday. Condit received an undisclosed sum and an apology, according to a statement released to the Associated Press from Condit's lawyer.
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