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Vannevar Bush

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BUSINESS
May 24, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
No formal ceremonies are planned, which is too bad. You won't find his image on any currency or postage stamps. Even though he is the individual most responsible for America's technological pre-eminence, he's barely mentioned, if at all, in high school history texts. For what it's worth, the National Science Board gives out a nice little medal and citation in his name.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
No formal ceremonies are planned, which is too bad. You won't find his image on any currency or postage stamps. Even though he is the individual most responsible for America's technological pre-eminence, he's barely mentioned, if at all, in high school history texts. For what it's worth, the National Science Board gives out a nice little medal and citation in his name.
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BUSINESS
August 24, 1986
In the interests of historical accuracy, I believe that John Lawrence ("Work Starts on Superhighway of Knowledge," Aug. 17) and Robert Kahn ought to know that the work began at least as early as 1945. In July of that year, Atlantic Monthly published an article, "As We May Think," written by Vannevar Bush. Bush had been the director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II. An eminent scientist in his own right, he had been the president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology; he was also the inventor of an early computer called the Digital Differential Analyzer.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1986
In the interests of historical accuracy, I believe that John Lawrence ("Work Starts on Superhighway of Knowledge," Aug. 17) and Robert Kahn ought to know that the work began at least as early as 1945. In July of that year, Atlantic Monthly published an article, "As We May Think," written by Vannevar Bush. Bush had been the director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II. An eminent scientist in his own right, he had been the president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology; he was also the inventor of an early computer called the Digital Differential Analyzer.
OPINION
April 28, 1996 | RICHARD C. ATKINSON, Richard C. Atkinson is president of the University of California and a former director of the National Science Foundation
IIn 1945, Vannevar Bush, a pragmatic engineer who had been Franklin Roosevelt's science advisor during World War II, submitted a report to President Truman that was destined to serve as the cornerstone of postwar science policy. In "Science, the Endless Frontier," Bush argued that the national interest demanded federal investment in research performed in universities--basic research that would ultimately lay the groundwork for new products and new processes for industry.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1995 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, MICHAEL SCHRAGE is a consultant and a research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author of "No More Teams! Mastering the Dynamics of Creative Collaboration."
Fifty years ago this month--the same month the atomic bomb was successfully tested and readied for use against Japan--the man who oversaw the Manhattan Project published an article in the Atlantic Monthly about the greatest challenge facing science and technology in the coming postwar era. That challenge had absolutely nothing to do with the mysteries of the atom, but practically everything to do with the future of software.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1994
It has been largely lost in the hubbub over Haiti and other headline-grabbing issues, but the Clinton Administration has been quietly trying to bring a new rationale to American science policy. Probably no administration since President John F. Kennedy's has taken such a strong interest in harnessing science and technology to promote national interests and economic competitiveness.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
Southern California Congressman George E. Brown Jr., who died July 15 at age 79, was one of the most courageous and visionary members of Congress of the last 50 years. He was my political hero. The American public did not get to know Brown well, despite his 36 years in the House of Representatives. The San Bernardino Democrat was not a "star" of Washington, in part because of his polite, soft-spoken, grandfatherly demeanor.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2008 | Beau Friedlander, Friedlander is editor in chief of AirAmerica.com.
"On or about December, 1910," Virginia Woolf once wrote, "the world changed." Sometime during the early aughts of this century, it changed again. The Internet leveled our cultural landscape. There was an epistemological free-for-all, a paradigm shift. The pyramid of media hierarchy flipped -- top down became bottom up -- and people-powered content started to change the way we think. In 2002, I owned a small independent publisher, Context Books.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1996 | LEE DYE
Is the pursuit of scientific knowledge such a noble human endeavor that all science should be nurtured regardless of whether any good is likely to come from it? Or should science be tailored to meet the most pressing needs of a society that now finds its economic resources severely restricted? Those two basic questions lie at the heart of a schism that is spreading slowly throughout the scientific community.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1992 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
As both a new year and a new Administration approach, one question completely dominates the 1993 innovation agenda: Should Washington become the nation's next capital of innovation, and will it? Once upon a time, Pittsburgh, Detroit and Wilmington, Del., were the nation's innovation capitals: Their smokestacks literally symbolized American industry.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1993 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
Just as war is too important to be entrusted to the generals, a new report from the prestigious National Academy of Sciences confirms that America's science and technology policy is too important to be entrusted to the scientists and technologists. While their hearts and minds may be in the right place, their ideas and ingenuity are not.
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