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April 7, 1990 | Associated Press
A state jury awarded $3.5 million Friday in a 13-year-old lawsuit accusing one of the nation's largest "vanity" publishers of fraud and deception. The class action suit represents 2,200 authors who have paid up to $8,000 each to have their book manuscripts published by New York-based Vantage Press since 1971. Those titles include "Dogs I Have Known" and "The Sex Life of a Football Referee." The civil suit charged that Vantage Press made no effort to sell books or promote its authors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A man accused of killing nine of his children wrote a book about his life -- a life prosecutors have argued included polygamy, incest and abuse of his children. In a letter he sent to the Fresno Bee this week, Marcus Wesson talked about the book, titled "In the Night, of the Light, for the Dark," and gave the paper permission to look into it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A man accused of killing nine of his children wrote a book about his life -- a life prosecutors have argued included polygamy, incest and abuse of his children. In a letter he sent to the Fresno Bee this week, Marcus Wesson talked about the book, titled "In the Night, of the Light, for the Dark," and gave the paper permission to look into it.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | Associated Press
A state jury awarded $3.5 million Friday in a 13-year-old lawsuit accusing one of the nation's largest "vanity" publishers of fraud and deception. The class action suit represents 2,200 authors who have paid up to $8,000 each to have their book manuscripts published by New York-based Vantage Press since 1971. Those titles include "Dogs I Have Known" and "The Sex Life of a Football Referee." The civil suit charged that Vantage Press made no effort to sell books or promote its authors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1988 | PATT MORRISON and ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writers
They arose early and got themselves all decked out: she in a midcalf dress of some soft beige, he in a jacket and tie--the first tie Scott Roston's roommate had ever seen him wear. Scott Roston and Karen Waltz raced to Las Vegas on Feb. 4 in his leased red Toyota two-seater and were wed in a $25 civil ceremony in a marriage commissioner's office enlivened by some blue and white artificial flowers. Then they raced back to Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1988 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, United Press International
A honeymooning bride who plunged to her death from the deck of a luxury liner drowned after she was choked and thrown overboard, a coroner's opinion released Tuesday showed. And in a bizarre twist, the woman's husband, Scott R. Roston, insisted Tuesday that Israeli agents murdered his wife and tried to frame him in retaliation for what he claims was his expose of "the countless crimes" committed by the Israeli government. The body of Karen W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1988 | ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writer
A Santa Monica man being held for allegedly throwing his bride off a cruise ship claimed Tuesday that she was killed by Israeli agents trying to frame him because of a book he wrote exposing purported crimes committed by Israel. Scott Roston, 36, originally told authorities that he and his wife were jogging on the deck of the cruise ship Star Dancer when a strong wind blew her overboard and he was unsuccessful in rescuing her.
SPORTS
May 9, 2002 | Steve Rom
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed: What: "Base Hit" Author: Alan Posner Publisher: Vantage Press Price: $22.95 Alan Posner's "Base Hit" is a smoothly written novel that combines the intricacies of baseball, love and revenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1986 | Associated Press
Milton Green spend half a century in the legal profession as an attorney and law professor. In that time, he found enough he thought was funny about the law to fill a book. For instance, Green recounts the tale of a lawyer who wanted to discredit the testimony of a witness in a personal injury suit. The witness as the best friend of the supposed victim and had testified that his friend had been acting strangely since the accident. "You don't know how he acts when he is alone, do you?"
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