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Varanasi India

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TRAVEL
November 26, 1995 | CARL DUNCAN, Duncan is a free-lance writer, based in British Columbia, Canada. Maria Horback contributed to this article.
It is just before dawn and the wide steps of the Dasaswamedh Ghat leading down to the Ganges are already crowded. Scattered groups swell into masses, and the lowest level becomes a wall of humanity; people from all walks of life, every caste and every part of the country, all crowd down to the river for sunrise. Rudyard Kipling called it "the greatest spectacle in India." Saris shimmer as bathers wade out into the swirling water. Others merely splash the sacred waters to their foreheads.
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TRAVEL
November 26, 1995 | CARL DUNCAN, Duncan is a free-lance writer, based in British Columbia, Canada. Maria Horback contributed to this article.
It is just before dawn and the wide steps of the Dasaswamedh Ghat leading down to the Ganges are already crowded. Scattered groups swell into masses, and the lowest level becomes a wall of humanity; people from all walks of life, every caste and every part of the country, all crowd down to the river for sunrise. Rudyard Kipling called it "the greatest spectacle in India." Saris shimmer as bathers wade out into the swirling water. Others merely splash the sacred waters to their foreheads.
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WORLD
April 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The alleged mastermind of deadly bombings last month in Hinduism's holiest city said the attacks were carried out as revenge for the 1992 destruction of a 16th century mosque by Hindu mobs in the town of Ayodhya. Wali-Ullah was among six suspects arrested in the March 7 bombings at a temple and train station in Varanasi, India. The blasts killed 20 people. S.K.
OPINION
September 5, 2007
Re "A final rite's toll on the living," Sept. 3 This article refers to the practice prevalent at Varanasi, India, that is very sacred to Hindus. Hindus, if they can, wish to die at Varanasi, and traditional practice is cremation with wood fire, or better with cow-dung cakes. In many urban areas, such as Bangalore and other big cities, the municipal authorities have installed electric crematoriums, which are clean and hygienic, and the cost is nominal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bismillah Khan, 90, a master of the Indian wind instrument called the shehnai, died Monday of a heart attack in the Hindu holy city of Varanasi, India. He had been in failing health for several months and was hospitalized last week as his condition deteriorated. Similar to a clarinet, the shehnai has six to nine holes and employs two sets of double reeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1985 | Don Smith
The 1984 Citizen of the Year in Newport Beach is builder William Lusk, vice chairman of the John E. Lusk and Son development company. Lusk is a member of Big Brothers, the Boy Scouts, City of Hope, the 552 Club of Hoag Memorial Hospital, vice chairman of the Newport Beach Citizens Traffic Advisory Committee and chairman of the annual Police Awards Luncheon.
TRAVEL
February 13, 2000 | LUCY IZON
The first time I visited China, I was shocked when I saw people wearing surgical masks as they walked down city streets. Smugly I thought to myself, "I'd never be that rude." After three days of weaving my way around Beijing, I began having trouble breathing and started looking for a store that sold the face masks. I'd realized that wearing one was a necessity; it didn't offend anyone. It was one of those things I wish I'd known about before I arrived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Margi Scharff, an artist who made intricate, jewel-like collages from scraps she collected in her vagabond travels through Asia, has died. She was 52. Scharff died July 2 at a cousin's home in Tiburon, Calif. The cause was ovarian cancer, said poet Penelope Moffet, a friend. In recent years, Scharff traveled constantly and had no permanent residence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2003 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
If, as she was once told by an Episcopal bishop, the idea of pilgrimage is an attempt to "invite into our hearts what we know in our heads," then the disparate journeys undertaken by Rosemary Mahoney in her travelogue-memoir "The Singular Pilgrim" are successful in different ways, inviting into her heart aspects of herself and her struggles with belief that previously were known to her intellect alone.
WORLD
July 30, 2007 | Hisako Ueno and Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writers
Japanese voters delivered a stinging slap to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's nationalist obsessions Sunday, punishing his government for focusing on the grand ambition of a more assertive Japan while allowing the day-to-day management of the economy to descend into scandal and disarray.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 4,000 people died and 20,000 were injured when a major earthquake, followed by deadly landslides, shattered towns and villages in a remote region of Afghanistan, the country's ambassador to the U.N. reported Friday. Because of freezing temperatures and the difficulty of getting assistance into the area, fatalities were expected to increase among the injured and the estimated 40,000 people left homeless by the magnitude 6.1 temblor, said Ravan A.G.
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