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NEWS
June 1, 1989
Air quality officials postponed a hearing on whether to grant another variance for Long Beach's high-technology trash incinerator until June 8, giving extra time for plant officials to try to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions. Bill Davis, the city's solid-waste manager, said work crews from the plant's builder, Dravo Corp., will be trying to solve the excess emissions problem. With those assurances in hand, the city can present a stronger case to the South Coast Air Quality Management District for the variance, Davis said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Matt Stevens and Martha Groves
Skating fans in Culver City were celebrating a temporary victory after city officials dug out an obscure document that advocates hope can keep an ice rink in the neighborhood. City officials informed the owner of Culver City Ice Arena of its findings last week. They said a use variance granted in 1960 prohibits the use of the property for anything except an ice rink. The new lessee, Planet Granite, plans to convert the 52-year-old rink into a rock climbing, fitness and yoga facility.
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NEWS
June 18, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
This city's trash-to-energy incinerator has won a new variance that will allow short daily periods of excessive nitrogen oxide emissions. The South Coast Air Quality Management District approved the variance Thursday after city officials said they are making repairs on the Southeast Resource Recovery Facility, a $105-million joint project between the city and County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County. The facility burns trash to produce electricity. Plant officials said they are installing new nozzles that will spray ammonia into the furnace to chemically destroy the nitrogen oxide.
OPINION
January 24, 2014
Re "The power of five," Opinion, Jan. 19 Eric J. Segall bluntly states what most people recognize: The Supreme Court is simply another political institution. The standard of "irreconcilable variance" that Segall discusses sounds good in theory, but knowing how lawyers think - or "mis-think" - even this standard is ultimately in the eye of the beholder. We should consider imposing some form of supermajority on the court for overturning an act of Congress. Since many, if not most, of the issues in which this standard would apply are truly political ones, they are best left to the legislative process, not to "the power of five.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1989
A pioneering refuse-to-energy plant in Commerce on Wednesday received a variance from emissions standards to allow it to remain in operation pending improvements to its pollution-control equipment. The hearing board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District voted 4-1 in favor of the variance and continued the hearing until April 27, when precise permit conditions will be set. In January, the AQMD denied the plant's permanent operating permit because it exceeded emissions standards for nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide.
NEWS
April 3, 1986
The City Council unanimously rejected an attempt by the El Prado Estates Homeowners Assn. to block construction of a single-family residence at 30520 Palos Verdes Drive East. Citing potential drainage, geology, view and traffic problems in connection with the large, modern structure proposed on sloping canyon property, neighbors urged the council to deny a variance granted by the Planning Commission that will allow the home to be 45 feet high, 15 feet above the residential limit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1998
Re Prayer groups in schools (May 9): Schools are for learning and providing an education. Learning begins with curiosity and questions. Prayer groups do not require either of these two elements; they demand faith. Faith is an unquestioning belief in a dogma. In a group of students, whether seniors or freshman, there is usually a wide variance of beliefs; whose will prevail? There is no place for prayer in public schools; it is divisive. In my opinion, this is another ploy by the fundamentalist Christians in their attempt to make their beliefs the established religion of the United States.
REAL ESTATE
April 23, 1989
For several weeks now, Andy Lang has given misinformation regarding building codes in the Southern California area (in general) and Los Angeles in particular. Regarding last week's Handyman Q&A column ("Discuss Fence With Your Neighbor"), permits are almost never required for fences, if one stops below the 6-foot height in rear and sides, and 30 inches at the front. A variance, without a conventional building permit is sufficient if those heights are exceeded. Hope this information is helpful--before the building departments are flooded with requests for fence permits.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Anyone left wondering about the fate of the now-famous treehouse in Billings, Mont. - the grand structure built by two boys and their grandfather in violation of the city's building code - need wonder no more. The treehouse has won a reprieve. In a unanimous vote Wednesday night, the Billings Board of Adjustment approved a variance allowing the structure to remain where it is - perched in a tree in the frontyard of the Olson family home. Logan Olson, 8, and his brother Dillon, 12, testified and brought letters to the board urging it to grant  permission to keep the treehouse, in which a support post had been inadvertently placed too close to the sidewalk.  Earlier, they had gathered signatures from neighbors endorsing the unusual, 80-square-foot structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1985
The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to allow a home for retarded children to be built in a neighborhood of single-family homes in Reseda, despite objections of some residents of the area. Councilwoman Joy Picus, who represents the area and supported the foundation's request, said that, although it "pained" her to act against the wishes of constituents, the "need for such homes is great." James R.
OPINION
October 15, 2013 | By H. Gilbert Welch
Similar populations living in different regions of the United States get exposed to wildly different amounts of medical care. If that sounds like an old story, it is. It's now four decades old. But it is an important story to reflect on as we consider the path forward for our medical care system. In the late 1960s, a nephrologist trained in epidemiology was sent to Burlington, Vt., to run the state's regional medical program. The program was part of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration's effort to bring the advances of modern medicine to all parts of the nation.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Anyone left wondering about the fate of the now-famous treehouse in Billings, Mont. - the grand structure built by two boys and their grandfather in violation of the city's building code - need wonder no more. The treehouse has won a reprieve. In a unanimous vote Wednesday night, the Billings Board of Adjustment approved a variance allowing the structure to remain where it is - perched in a tree in the frontyard of the Olson family home. Logan Olson, 8, and his brother Dillon, 12, testified and brought letters to the board urging it to grant  permission to keep the treehouse, in which a support post had been inadvertently placed too close to the sidewalk.  Earlier, they had gathered signatures from neighbors endorsing the unusual, 80-square-foot structure.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
When 8-year-old Logan Olson told his family he wanted a treehouse for his birthday, his grandfather was determined to make it not just any treehouse, but a grand one - a treehouse the whole neighborhood could admire. The tan, barn-like structure sprawls 80 square feet atop a graceful old linden tree on the front lawn of the family's single-story tract home in Billings, Mont. It has a deck on three sides, with a door that looks like a barn entry, a tire swing suspended from the floor and a pulley to hoist up lunch.
OPINION
January 24, 2012 | By Rosalind Barnett and Caryl Rivers
Do boys lose out when girls start to do better in math? Do girls' successes lead to a "boy crisis"? An important new study says the answer is a definitive no. When girls do better in society, both sexes benefit. Gender equity is good for everybody. And boys and girls are becoming more equal, globally, in math performance. The study by Jonathan M. Kane and Janet E. Mertz of the University of Wisconsin analyzed scores from more than half a million fourth- and eighth-graders from 86 countries.
OPINION
March 2, 2011
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa wants to build a 6-foot-high fence in front of his official residence, Getty House. To do so, he needs a variance from the city, which limits fences and walls to 42 inches. Of course, in a historic preservation area, a fence is never just a fence. The proposal has not escaped the scrutiny and criticism of the mayor's neighbors in Windsor Square, the venerable Mid-city neighborhood of stately historic homes and lush landscapes that preservationists protectively monitor and film location scouts lust after.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2002 | From staff and wire reports
The Santa Ana Planning Commission voted 5 to 1 this week to deny a swap meet mall a variance that would have allowed it to stay open. The mall had operated for several years; its owner says its use was shown in plans filed when it opened. The city says first objected two years ago during a code enforcement program. Commission member Chris Leo opposed the denial. Wayne Avrashow, attorney for owner Dale Lee, said Lee will appeal the decision to the City Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1987
The idea of the former president of the Southern Baptist Convention that Jews who do not accept Christ are not saved is entirely wrong. It is at variance with biblical teachings of the love of God. Of course, the whole world may be lost in a nuclear war if humanity does not change its ways. Bigotry and war are anachronistic and must be ended if anyone is to survive. I feel it is high time for religions to stop fighting each other and join together in a common effort to make the world better.
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | RENE ROMO, Times Staff Writer
Arman Akarakian's plan to remodel the Liberty Theater building, which was severely damaged in the Oct. 1 earthquake and ordered evacuated, has stalled for the moment. More than half of the building's ceilings and walls were veined with cracks. Twenty tons of brick were shaken off its west wall and toppled onto an adjacent apartment building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2002 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time is running out for the Theodore Payne Foundation. For almost 30 years, the nonprofit organization has sold wildflowers and other native plants out of a modest wooden building in Sun Valley. But the zoning variance that allows it to operate its current office expires Sept. 14. Unless a new variance is approved by the city of Los Angeles, the foundation will have to find another home from which to preach the virtues of native plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Frances Berumen has no trouble directing customers to her legal document shop near the Centerpoint Mall. "Look for the ugly purple building," she says. Berumen's store at Saviers Road and Laurel Street sits across the street from "the Barney Building," so called because of its lavender-and-plum exterior. But some neighbors are working to make sure that the color of the building, which houses a music store and a dental office, goes the way of the dinosaurs.
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