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NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Vaccinating children who are more than a year old against varicella, or chicken pox, also provides "tremendous indirect benefits" to young babies, researchers reported Monday in the journal Pediatrics. The U.S. implemented a variella vaccine program in 1995, offering the vaccine to children 12 months and older.  But younger babies who aren't old enough to get the vaccine are protected through so-called "herd immunity" -- because fewer older kids develop chicken pox, the younger children are less likely to be exposed to the virus.
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NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Once upon a time, not too terribly long ago, getting the chicken pox was practically a rite of passage for kids. But now, nearly 20 years after approval of a vaccine for the varicella virus, which causes the itchy illness, chicken pox is a rarity. A new study conducted by researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Northern California and published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics confirms that the vaccine is, indeed, effective -- reducing cases of chicken pox in one large cohort of kids as much as tenfold over a 14-year study period.
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SCIENCE
June 27, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Children who receive a single vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella and chicken pox appear to have an increased risk of fever-related seizures in the days after the shot than do children who receive two separate vaccinations. A combination vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (commonly known as chicken pox) was approved for use in 2005, providing an option for parents who wanted to stick one fewer needle in their small children. Since then, parents could choose either that single vaccine, called measles-mumps-rubella-varicella, or two separate shots, one for measles-mumps-rubella and one for varicella.
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Vaccinating children who are more than a year old against varicella, or chicken pox, also provides "tremendous indirect benefits" to young babies, researchers reported Monday in the journal Pediatrics. The U.S. implemented a variella vaccine program in 1995, offering the vaccine to children 12 months and older.  But younger babies who aren't old enough to get the vaccine are protected through so-called "herd immunity" -- because fewer older kids develop chicken pox, the younger children are less likely to be exposed to the virus.
SCIENCE
January 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Children whose parents refuse to let them be vaccinated for chickenpox are nine times as likely as vaccinated children to develop chickenpox that requires medical attention, researchers reported Monday. Although the conclusion may seem self-evident, it reflects a growing problem with childhood immunizations, said epidemiologist Jason M. Glanz of Kaiser Permanente's Institute for Health Research in Denver, the lead author of the report in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Once upon a time, not too terribly long ago, getting the chicken pox was practically a rite of passage for kids. But now, nearly 20 years after approval of a vaccine for the varicella virus, which causes the itchy illness, chicken pox is a rarity. A new study conducted by researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Northern California and published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics confirms that the vaccine is, indeed, effective -- reducing cases of chicken pox in one large cohort of kids as much as tenfold over a 14-year study period.
HEALTH
April 12, 1999
Varicella, or chickenpox--the name most people know--is a viral disease that's highly contagious, as parents of young children know. The onset of symptoms typically occurs between 10 to 20 days after exposure. Those symptoms include fever and the eruption of itchy red bumps that develop into blisters. Parents have a relatively new tool to fight chickenpox--a vaccine approved for use in 1995. Children should be immunized when they are 12 to 18 months old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Thomas H. Weller, the Harvard virologist who shared the 1954 Nobel Prize in medicine for developing techniques to grow the polio virus in the laboratory, a feat that laid the groundwork for the development of the polio vaccine and the feared virus' near-eradication from the world, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Needham, Mass. He was 93. The techniques developed by Weller, Dr. John F. Enders and Dr. Frederick C. Robbins made it possible to grow a host of other viruses in the laboratory and led to the creation of many other vaccines.
HEALTH
May 14, 2001 | JONATHAN FIELDING
Immunizations are probably responsible for saving more children's lives than any other medical development in the history of this country. Yet, six years after its approval by the Food and Drug Administration, an immunization designed to protect children against varicella--the virus that causes chickenpox--still has not gained complete acceptance.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Deaths from chickenpox have dropped dramatically, and are almost nonexistent, since it became routine to vaccinate against the itchy illness.   The death rate from the virus dropped 88% in the 12 years since the varicella vaccine was introduced in 1995, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   The drop among children and adolescents (under 20 years) was even greater - 97% in the same time period. The researchers, from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, reported the trend online Monday in Pediatrics .   A success, yes, particularly for children.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Children who receive a single vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella and chicken pox appear to have an increased risk of fever-related seizures in the days after the shot than do children who receive two separate vaccinations. A combination vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (commonly known as chicken pox) was approved for use in 2005, providing an option for parents who wanted to stick one fewer needle in their small children. Since then, parents could choose either that single vaccine, called measles-mumps-rubella-varicella, or two separate shots, one for measles-mumps-rubella and one for varicella.
SCIENCE
January 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Children whose parents refuse to let them be vaccinated for chickenpox are nine times as likely as vaccinated children to develop chickenpox that requires medical attention, researchers reported Monday. Although the conclusion may seem self-evident, it reflects a growing problem with childhood immunizations, said epidemiologist Jason M. Glanz of Kaiser Permanente's Institute for Health Research in Denver, the lead author of the report in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Thomas H. Weller, the Harvard virologist who shared the 1954 Nobel Prize in medicine for developing techniques to grow the polio virus in the laboratory, a feat that laid the groundwork for the development of the polio vaccine and the feared virus' near-eradication from the world, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Needham, Mass. He was 93. The techniques developed by Weller, Dr. John F. Enders and Dr. Frederick C. Robbins made it possible to grow a host of other viruses in the laboratory and led to the creation of many other vaccines.
HEALTH
April 12, 1999
Varicella, or chickenpox--the name most people know--is a viral disease that's highly contagious, as parents of young children know. The onset of symptoms typically occurs between 10 to 20 days after exposure. Those symptoms include fever and the eruption of itchy red bumps that develop into blisters. Parents have a relatively new tool to fight chickenpox--a vaccine approved for use in 1995. Children should be immunized when they are 12 to 18 months old.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
This week, press reports emerged that some parents, hoping to avoid giving their kids the chickenpox vaccine, were arranging through Facebook to pay strangers to send them "[licked] lollipops, spit or other items" from kids with the illness. The idea is to expose the kids to the virus to build immunity without having to get a shot.   It's a lousy strategy, doctors say. Dr. Wilbert Mason, a professor of clinical pediatrics at USC's Keck School of Medicine and an infectious disease expert at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, said he was "dumbfounded" by the news.  "I'm speechless, which will make for a very bad interview," he told Booster Shots.  "How could people be so stupid?"
HEALTH
February 23, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Because some children vaccinated against chickenpox eventually develop the disease, researchers at Yale University decided to test the immunization's effectiveness. They found that protection is strongest in the first year after the varicella vaccine is given -- with a 97% prevention rate -- but that the effectiveness drops to 86% in the second year and 81% in the seventh and eighth years.
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