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Varicose Veins

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NEWS
May 29, 1991 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
About 36 million Americans, most of them women, have varicose veins. They are often swollen, blue and lumpy and can be painful. How best to get rid of these veins--which are unnecessary for normal circulation--is hotly debated among doctors. For years, the standard treatment was stripping surgery, in which large segments of varicose veins are removed through incisions in the skin. Now, doctors have other options, among them sclerotherapy and ambulatory phlebectomy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Heidi Klum does nothing if not display abundant self-confidence every Halloween: This year's costume saw the supermodel decades in the future as a completely believable, Hollywood-makeup-assisted old lady. Who's afraid of aging, right? Or maybe it's her scariest costume ever! Klum posted shots of her transformation throughout the day on her Twitter feed, including makeup artists Bill Corso and Mike Marino applying her facial prosthetics and the end result of gaining raised varicose veins on her legs.
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MAGAZINE
October 30, 1988 | PADDY CALISTRO
ABOUT 36 million women in America are happy that pants are in and minis are out. They're the women who hate wearing shorts and always select dark or opaque hosiery. They're the ones who have varicose veins, a painful vascular problem that for some is also a distressing beauty concern. Women can conceal veins with makeup, but some want permanent relief. Vein specialists are beginning to stress the aesthetic benefits of treatment as much as the therapeutic advantages.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
The flip side of enduring summer's spate of grab-bag group exhibitions is getting to see work by new artists. “Acirema,” at Honor Fraser, provides a fine platform for eight talented artists of Latin American origin, several exhibiting in L.A. for the first time. The show is light on its feet, despite a ponderous rationale. The title of the exhibition is “America” spelled backwards, which curator Cesar Garcia intends to signal an alternative to dominant modes of thinking. However, the selected works invoke a very familiar system of knowledge - that of global conceptual art. With artists hailing from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic and Mexico, the show ends up reinforcing rather than puncturing the contours of that grab-bag place, Latin America.
NEWS
June 19, 1986 | DR. NEIL SOLOMON
Question: Your recent answer to the question about varicose veins is interesting. I would like to mention injection compression therapy for veins as an alternate to surgery. The question asked by Mrs. S.L. of Trenton, N.J., was whether or not stockings would prevent an operation. I stopped operating on varicose veins nearly 20 years ago because the standard stripping operation does not cure the condition. In fact, there is no cure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1989 | Reprinted from the Johns Hopkins Medical Letter
Our prehistoric ancestors' innovation of walking upright may have helped us create civilization, but it also put a lot of stress on our legs--particularly on their thin-walled veins. Blood is pumped under pressure out of the heart into arteries, and gravity helps it reach its destination in the lower extremities. But the return trip through the veins against gravity is not so easy.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
No matter how beastly the heat, Sheila Parker wouldn't wear shorts. Not even to the beach. "I just didn't want anyone to see my legs," the 38-year-old San Clemente businesswoman says. She was self-conscious about the unsightly varicose veins that crisscrossed her legs like a road map. Then she heard about sclerotherapy, a nonsurgical injection technique to obliterate the veins. Six treatments and $2,400 later, Parker is wearing shorts. And giggling about eyeing even shorter shorts.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | From Reuters
Special panty hose designed for older women with varicose veins are being snapped up by miniskirted Japanese girls who want to make their legs look thinner. "They are wearing the panty hose to make their thighs and calves look thinner, especially when they want to wear tight miniskirts," said Yoshiko Fukuoka, owner of a company that markets the hose. Sales are booming even though the panty hose, tightly woven to hold in the flesh, cost 40 times as much as an ordinary pair.
HEALTH
January 27, 2003 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Tallying up the hours logged over a long career, Claudia Leoni figures she has spent 15 solid years on her feet, working among some of the most appearance-conscious and observant people around. The sort of people who don't hesitate to take action when they see something in the mirror that's aesthetically not right. "Working all this time in a hair salon, I see people who've had all sorts of cosmetic procedures done -- big things," said Leoni, 55, of San Marino.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | CHARLES S. TAYLOR, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
You are looking at your legs one day and notice the beginnings of unsightly varicose or spider veins. "Well," you might say, "I may have to have surgery on those one of these days." But Dr. Terrance Walsh says that is not necessarily the case. All you may need to do is get a few virtually painless injections to make those lumpy veins disappear. Symptoms include aching, swelling, a sense of heaviness, itching and leg restlessness. Complications range from leg cramps to severe disability.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011
The Early Show (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Paris Hilton; Lucinda Scala Quinn; Heather Graham. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC KTLA Morning News (N) 7 a.m. KTLA Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC Rachael Ray Elisabeth Hasselbeck. 9 a.m. KCBS Live With Regis and Kelly Lauren Alaina performs; Barbara Sinatra; David Kirsch. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Paris and Kathy Hilton; Jacques d'Amboise. (N) 10 a.m. KABC The Doctors Feeling healthy. (N) 11 a.m. KCAL The Talk Angie Harmon; Michelle Rhee of former head of D.C. schools.
HEALTH
January 27, 2003 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Tallying up the hours logged over a long career, Claudia Leoni figures she has spent 15 solid years on her feet, working among some of the most appearance-conscious and observant people around. The sort of people who don't hesitate to take action when they see something in the mirror that's aesthetically not right. "Working all this time in a hair salon, I see people who've had all sorts of cosmetic procedures done -- big things," said Leoni, 55, of San Marino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2001 | B. RENAUD GONZALEZ, B. Renaud Gonzalez is a writer in San Antonio
If you saw her on the street, you wouldn't have looked twice. My mother, Marina. Marina, levantate. A basket of sweet bread with pink-cloud icing at dawn. Boxes of Chiclets rattling like marbles at the plaza. Handmade ladies' dresses starchy and heavy on her 5-year-old arms. She wants to play, but she can't.
HEALTH
December 11, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL
Slim, svelte legs: We don't all get 'em. Legs can be plump and dimpled; varicose veins and swollen ankles can mar those aesthetic curves. Well, guess what? "Hypothermia and PressoTherapy, available at the finest salons across the United States," can "significantly reduce and eliminate leg pain, recontour unshapely legs and restore the skin's smooth, velvety texture." So write publicists for a chain of beauty salons.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | JUDIE GLAVE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mama may say it's the right thing to do, but forget good manners and uncross those legs. Sitting like a proper lady or gentleman interrupts the flow of blood to the heart and may promote varicose veins, according to one expert. One in four adults has vein problems, although women are four to 10 times more likely to develop them, said Dr. Luis Navarro, a surgeon who runs the Vein Treatment Center at Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
There's nothing like bathing suit season to bring out a woman's concerns about the spider and varicose veins on her legs. But before opting for expensive laser surgery to zap the unsightly spots, you may want to try Venastat, a natural dietary supplement that may reduce existing varicose veins, protect against leg swelling and help maintain leg vein circulation.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
There's nothing like bathing suit season to bring out a woman's concerns about the spider and varicose veins on her legs. But before opting for expensive laser surgery to zap the unsightly spots, you may want to try Venastat, a natural dietary supplement that may reduce existing varicose veins, protect against leg swelling and help maintain leg vein circulation.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | JUDIE GLAVE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mama may say it's the right thing to do, but forget good manners and uncross those legs. Sitting like a proper lady or gentleman interrupts the flow of blood to the heart and may promote varicose veins, according to one expert. One in four adults has vein problems, although women are four to 10 times more likely to develop them, said Dr. Luis Navarro, a surgeon who runs the Vein Treatment Center at Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan.
NEWS
December 12, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's the posture preferred by short-skirt wearers, some leg men and tired desk-bound workers. And now, crossing the legs has gotten a thumbs up from orthopedic experts who say that the posture is "physiologically valuable." "Look around, almost everybody crosses their legs," says Chris J. Snijders, professor of biomedical physics and technology at Erasmus University in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. He and his research team wondered if leg-crossing, which is so common, has any beneficial effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN
I t's alive! Not. "Frankenstein," a TNT cable movie premiering Sunday at 5 and 8 p.m., aims to breathe new life into Mary Shelley's 1818 fable by adhering more closely to the novel than most of the previous myriad screen treatments. Despite TNT's ad claims that "the real story is the most horrifying of all," most of the usual terrorizing elements have been deliberately stripped from this more sober-minded telling. Sounds swell in theory.
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