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SPORTS
February 27, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
A week or so ago, we asked you to vote for the 10 best sports movies of all time. And 9,280 ballots later, we unveil your picks. No. 6: "Raging Bull" (1,113 first-place votes, 27,747 points) Directed by Martin Scorsese, 1980's "Raging Bull" stars Robert De Niro as Jake La Motta, a boxer whose rage and debauchery destroyed his relationship with almost everyone around him. De Niro, who won an Oscar for his portrayal, famously gained 60 pounds to portray La Motta in his post-boxing years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 27, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
A week or so ago, we asked you to vote for the 10 best sports movies of all time. And 9,280 ballots later, we unveil your picks. No. 6: "Raging Bull" (1,113 first-place votes, 27,747 points) Directed by Martin Scorsese, 1980's "Raging Bull" stars Robert De Niro as Jake La Motta, a boxer whose rage and debauchery destroyed his relationship with almost everyone around him. De Niro, who won an Oscar for his portrayal, famously gained 60 pounds to portray La Motta in his post-boxing years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1998 | Richard Natale, Richard Natale is a regular contributor to Calendar
Next time you watch your favorite sitcom or soap opera or read about the latest media mogul, remember to credit Variety. For most of the 20th century, Variety (born 1905) has not only filtered words and phrases like "sitcom," "soap opera," "mogul," "emcee" and "deejay" into the vernacular, but also created some of the most colorful and inimitable headlines in journalism. In 1929, the day after thecataclysmic stock market crash, the trade paper's banner read, "Wall Street Lays an Egg."
BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By Ben Fritz
In a move that will be watched carefully by newspapers struggling to find a viable financial model in the digital age, entertainment industry publication Variety today will begin charging readers for access to the news and information on its website. The return to erecting a "pay wall," though anticipated, nonetheless could be risky because several online competitors -- including the Hollywood Reporter, Deadline, the Wrap and the Los Angeles Times -- offer similar content without charge, potentially undermining Variety's ability to get subscribers to pay. Although it's one of the first publications to make the move to cut off unpaid access to its site, many others are examining the issue as advertising migrates from print to the Internet.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Bart returned to his job as editor in chief of Variety on Monday amid continuing skepticism about the thoroughness of the investigation that led to both his reinstatement and his 21-day suspension without pay. When Cahners Business Information, the owners of Variety, announced Bart's reinstatement late last month, company officials said they had conducted a "very serious, in-depth investigation . . .
BUSINESS
August 4, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Variety's Art Murphy, who is credited with introducing the movie box office reporting that has become a staple of daily newspapers, is leaving the Hollywood trade publication after nearly 30 years. Murphy notified Variety Editor Peter Bart in writing of his decision to resign as a contributor, effective immediately. Murphy was on vacation and could not be reached for comment, but sources said he had become disillusioned with changes at the trade paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer. and
B ULLETIN, VARIETY, SEPT. 6, 1933: "Late report from New York has it as open season for Walter Winchell. Billy Seeman, husband of Phyllis Haver, is reported to have taken a sock at Winchell . . . Reason: 'Gabby Walter' is said to have made an unethical crack about Mrs. Seeman." That bulletin about Winchell--once New York's premiere gossip columnist--is one of the first things to catch the eye of visitors in the lobby of Hollywood's venerable daily trade paper, Variety.
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Bart will be reinstated as editor in chief of Variety and Daily Variety, the influential entertainment industry trade papers, after completing a 21-day suspension without pay, the papers' parent company announced Thursday. Bart, 69, an increasingly powerful and controversial figure in Hollywood during his 12-year reign at Variety, was suspended Aug. 17, the day after Los Angeles magazine published a 14-page cover story on him.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1991 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter Bart, the controversial editor of Cahners Publishing Co.'s New York-based weekly Variety, was named to an additional post giving him editorial control of Daily Variety in Los Angeles. The surprise move follows years of intense rivalry between the two entertainment publications, which, despite their common ownership, have often bickered over story assignments and advertising accounts. Bart, 58, was named editorial director of Variety Inc.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Variety and Daily Variety, the trade papers regarded as bibles of the entertainment industry, have agreed to be acquired by Cahners Publishing Co., a publisher of business trade magazines, the companies announced late Monday. The purchase price was not disclosed for the deal, which is expected to be completed by mid-August. The two publications are among the most profitable in the entertainment business and posted combined 1986 revenue of $20 million.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2009 | By Ben Fritz
Leo Wolinsky, a former top editor at the Los Angeles Times, has been named editor of Daily Variety, a Hollywood business publication. Before leaving the paper last year, Wolinsky worked at The Times for 31 years in various senior positions, including executive editor and managing editor. He was part of Pulitzer Prize-winning teams that covered the Los Angeles riots in 1992 and the Northridge earthquake in 1994. In 2008 he served as associate editor in charge of features and entertainment for seven months, his only previous experience covering the show-business world.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Hollywood trade paper Variety is putting a seal on its website. Starting early next year, most or all of the content on Variety.com will be available only to those who subscribe to the print version or pay for a digital subscription. Publisher Brian Gott said executives were still considering whether small amounts of content would remain free. Discussions are also continuing about whether online pricing will be lower than or equivalent to that for the print edition. Over the last few years, online advertising revenue has failed to grow as many media executives had expected, leading newspapers to consider charging for some or all of their digital content in an effort to boost revenue.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2008 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
The 103-year-old Hollywood trade paper Variety went on the auction block Thursday when Anglo-Dutch company Reed Elsevier put its publishing unit up for sale. The company said the planned sale was strategic -- part of a move away from advertising-dependent to subscription-based publications and information services -- and no reflection on the performance of its Reed Business Information unit.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2007 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Charlie Koones will step down in March as president and publisher of Variety, the entertainment trade paper said Wednesday in a surprise announcement. Koones, 45, called the split amicable and said he hoped to raise venture capital or other private-equity financing to pursue unspecified opportunities in the media business. "With the right kind of funding behind me I'd like to acquire or build a venture in media and entertainment," he said. "This is a really good time to be in this business.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2003 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
The longtime editor of the entertainment trade publication Variety was sued Friday by a former editor who alleges he was fired after complaining about being harassed because he is gay. Ramin Zahed sued Variety, parent company Reed Elsevier and editor Peter Bart in Los Angeles County Superior Court for wrongful discharge. Also named was another Variety editor, Thomas Tapp. According to the lawsuit, Zahed was Variety's special reports editor until he was fired Sept. 6.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Bart returned to his job as editor in chief of Variety on Monday amid continuing skepticism about the thoroughness of the investigation that led to both his reinstatement and his 21-day suspension without pay. When Cahners Business Information, the owners of Variety, announced Bart's reinstatement late last month, company officials said they had conducted a "very serious, in-depth investigation . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We shall be glad to print nice things about you if you rate them. Maybe you'll rate the other kind. We'll print that also. Whatever you rate, will be what you create. If it's good, that's fine. If it's bad, it'll be your own fault, so don't squawk. --From debut edition of Daily Variety, Sept. 6, 1933 It was a Hollywood business story worthy of front-page treatment. Carolco Pictures was teetering.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1993 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the loss of his Screen Actors Guild health insurance, Lee Mathis was on edge. Eight years ago, he tested positive for HIV and, despite the fact he's asymptomatic, the prospect of developing AIDS looms large. "Anyone could be hit by a truck," Mathis says. "But with HIV, the wolf is at the door." Against the advice of friends who feared a homophobic backlash, Mathis placed a $99 ad in Variety a few weeks ago.
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Bart will be reinstated as editor in chief of Variety and Daily Variety, the influential entertainment industry trade papers, after completing a 21-day suspension without pay, the papers' parent company announced Thursday. Bart, 69, an increasingly powerful and controversial figure in Hollywood during his 12-year reign at Variety, was suspended Aug. 17, the day after Los Angeles magazine published a 14-page cover story on him.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1998 | Richard Natale, Richard Natale is a regular contributor to Calendar
Next time you watch your favorite sitcom or soap opera or read about the latest media mogul, remember to credit Variety. For most of the 20th century, Variety (born 1905) has not only filtered words and phrases like "sitcom," "soap opera," "mogul," "emcee" and "deejay" into the vernacular, but also created some of the most colorful and inimitable headlines in journalism. In 1929, the day after thecataclysmic stock market crash, the trade paper's banner read, "Wall Street Lays an Egg."
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