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Variflex Inc

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BUSINESS
September 3, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Variflex Inc. of Moorpark has announced a joint manufacturing agreement with Barfoot Snoboards, a pioneer in the snowboarding industry. The agreement calls for Variflex's subsidiary, Static Snowboards Inc., to manufacture, market and distribute all Barfoot snowboards for an initial term of one year. The agreement also contains an option for the possible future acquisition of all rights to the Barfoot brand name.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Variflex Inc., which sells skateboards featuring images of Shrek and SpongeBob SquarePants, agreed to be bought by closely held Bravo Sports for about $38 million in cash. Bravo will give Variflex shareholders $7.60 for each share they own, Variflex said. The price is about 2% lower than Moorpark-based Variflex's closing share price Thursday. Bravo, based in Cypress, makes components for skateboards and in-line skates.
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BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Variflex Inc. in Moorpark announced it has been granted a patent on its Quik Shade instant canopy. The company said it received the patent for the product's frame design. Quik Shade consists of a rust-resistant, one-piece folding steel frame with a water- and flame- resistant polyester top. The canopy can be erected in less than a minute. Variflex is a supplier of in-line skates, skateboards, skating protective equipment and recreational safety helmets.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Sales and earnings plummeted in the three months ended Oct. 30 at Variflex Inc., a Moorpark producer of in-line skates and other recreational equipment. In its latest quarter, the company had a net profit of $937,000, or 16 cents a share, on sales of $23.5 million. A year earlier, Variflex earned $2.7 million, or 46 cents a share, on sales of $31.8 million.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Variflex Inc., which sells skateboards featuring images of Shrek and SpongeBob SquarePants, agreed to be bought by closely held Bravo Sports for about $38 million in cash. Bravo will give Variflex shareholders $7.60 for each share they own, Variflex said. The price is about 2% lower than Moorpark-based Variflex's closing share price Thursday. Bravo, based in Cypress, makes components for skateboards and in-line skates.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1994 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Variflex Inc. is no stranger to fads. In the 1970s, the company rode to prominence on skateboard and roller-skate sales--and a wild ride it was, since both products fell out of fashion at breakneck speed. Variflex even dabbled in foot-powered scooters--remember those? Now President Raymond H. Losi II thinks the Moorpark-based company finally has a product with staying power. Variflex in-line skates have been such a stunning success that even he seems a bit dazed.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time last year, Variflex Inc. in Moorpark was a company to watch, rushing to fill demand for its inexpensive in-line skates, the kind that parents would buy for kids with fast-growing feet. Since then, the company has hit a few bumps on the sidewalk to success. Its stock price has plummeted, to about $7 a share on the Nasdaq from a high of $16.50 in February. Sales for the fiscal first quarter ended Oct. 31 tumbled from the comparable period last year by 26%, to $23.5 million.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1995 | Jack Searles
Variflex Inc., a fast-growing Moorpark producer of in-line skates and other products for the younger end of the sporting goods market, has launched a two-pronged campaign aimed at maintaining its expansion pace. Last week, the company negotiated a $20-million line of credit to help finance future growth. The new line, with First Interstate Bank, replaces a $16-million commitment with another lender.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1995 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond H. Losi II, president and CEO of the Moorpark-based sporting goods company Variflex Inc., is among 29 regional finalists in the Greater Los Angeles Entrepreneur of the Year Awards program. Losi and his father started Variflex in 1977, manufacturing skateboards and roller-skates, with an investment of a mere $10,000. Riding on the wheels of its popular in-line skates, which it introduced in 1990, the company reported sales of $80 million for the 1994 fiscal year.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Variflex in Moorpark has begun shipping the 3-D Helmet Series, a new line of safety helmets designed for children ages 2 to 15. The helmets, priced at around $20 each, come in eight models that feature textured three-dimensional graphics that depict an anatomically realistic brain, a skull, an alien, a princess crown and a teddy bear.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Variflex Inc. in Moorpark reported a net loss of $380,000 or 6 cents per share for the third quarter ended April 30, compared with net income in the comparable period a year ago of $707,000 or 12 cents per share. The loss came on net sales of $14.56 million. Sales for the year-ago quarter were $21.7 million. Company officials said the loss is due to a decrease both in the sales volume and average selling price for in-line skates and skateboards.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Variflex Inc. of Moorpark has announced a joint manufacturing agreement with Barfoot Snoboards, a pioneer in the snowboarding industry. The agreement calls for Variflex's subsidiary, Static Snowboards Inc., to manufacture, market and distribute all Barfoot snowboards for an initial term of one year. The agreement also contains an option for the possible future acquisition of all rights to the Barfoot brand name.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time last year, Variflex Inc. in Moorpark was a company to watch, rushing to fill demand for its inexpensive in-line skates, the kind that parents would buy for kids with fast-growing feet. Since then, the company has hit a few bumps on the sidewalk to success. Its stock price has plummeted, to about $7 a share on the Nasdaq from a high of $16.50 in February. Sales for the fiscal first quarter ended Oct. 31 tumbled from the comparable period last year by 26%, to $23.5 million.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Sales and earnings plummeted in the three months ended Oct. 30 at Variflex Inc., a Moorpark producer of in-line skates and other recreational equipment. In its latest quarter, the company had a net profit of $937,000, or 16 cents a share, on sales of $23.5 million. A year earlier, Variflex earned $2.7 million, or 46 cents a share, on sales of $31.8 million.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1995 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond H. Losi II, president and CEO of the Moorpark-based sporting goods company Variflex Inc., is among 29 regional finalists in the Greater Los Angeles Entrepreneur of the Year Awards program. Losi and his father started Variflex in 1977, manufacturing skateboards and roller-skates, with an investment of a mere $10,000. Riding on the wheels of its popular in-line skates, which it introduced in 1990, the company reported sales of $80 million for the 1994 fiscal year.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Variflex in Moorpark has begun shipping the 3-D Helmet Series, a new line of safety helmets designed for children ages 2 to 15. The helmets, priced at around $20 each, come in eight models that feature textured three-dimensional graphics that depict an anatomically realistic brain, a skull, an alien, a princess crown and a teddy bear.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Variflex Inc. in Moorpark announced it has been granted a patent on its Quik Shade instant canopy. The company said it received the patent for the product's frame design. Quik Shade consists of a rust-resistant, one-piece folding steel frame with a water- and flame- resistant polyester top. The canopy can be erected in less than a minute. Variflex is a supplier of in-line skates, skateboards, skating protective equipment and recreational safety helmets.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1995 | Jack Searles
Variflex Inc., a fast-growing Moorpark producer of in-line skates and other products for the younger end of the sporting goods market, has launched a two-pronged campaign aimed at maintaining its expansion pace. Last week, the company negotiated a $20-million line of credit to help finance future growth. The new line, with First Interstate Bank, replaces a $16-million commitment with another lender.
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