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Varley O Connor

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NEWS
January 31, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Varley O'Connor joined UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate writing program in the fall of 1986, the New York actress had been writing short stories in her spare time for several years. None of her stories had ever been published, however. "I didn't even try," she says. Writing was something she simply did for her own pleasure. "I was just fortunate in that I didn't know how good UCI was at the time," said O'Connor, who now teaches an advanced fiction workshop at UCI.
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NEWS
January 31, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Varley O'Connor joined UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate writing program in the fall of 1986, the New York actress had been writing short stories in her spare time for several years. None of her stories had ever been published, however. "I didn't even try," she says. Writing was something she simply did for her own pleasure. "I was just fortunate in that I didn't know how good UCI was at the time," said O'Connor, who now teaches an advanced fiction workshop at UCI.
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BOOKS
February 10, 1991 | Sharon Dirlam
LIKE CHINA by Varley O'Connor (William Morrow & Co.: $18.95; 290 pp.). It should be said that this book has nothing to do with China; "Like China" means a place that is incomprehensible. The novel tries to make sense of why a woman stays with a man who beats her up, phychologically abuses her and destroys her sense of herself as a person.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sowing Ti Leaves: Writings by Multi-Cultural Women" has been published by Multi-Cultural Women Writers of Orange County. The 140-page paperback book ($7.95) is a collection of personal narratives, poems, short stories and essays. The anthology was edited by Mitsuye Yamada and Sarie Sachie Hylkema. Contributors, in addition to the two editors, include Kelli Arakaki-Bond, Diana Azar, Helen Jaskoski, Janet Jue, Florinda Mintz, Susana Saladini and Kanwal Yodh.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
"Kerry Hart is going through emotional problems in his life." So begins high school freshman Tracy Nicken's critique of R.L. Stein's young adult novel, "Blind Date," in a recent issue of Dog Ear Press, a student book-review newsletter published at Western High School in Anaheim. The four-page newsletter, produced three times during the school year, features half a dozen student-written book reviews, in addition to student drawings and poems and a list of recent book additions to the library.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When novelist Lynne Sharon Schwartz accepted an invitation to teach the graduate fiction-writing workshop at UC Irvine last winter, she envisioned an "appealing respite" from a bleak and hectic winter in New York City. As it turned out, her 10-week stint was anything but the midwinter idyll she imagined. In a particularly bitter postscript to an article she wrote in the current issue of Poets & Writers Magazine, Schwartz says she "found the writing program at Irvine in a state of disarray."
NEWS
December 17, 1995
For someone undergoing her baptism of fire, Aimee Bender doesn't look nervous. The weekly graduate fiction writing workshop at UC Irvine is in progress, and Bender, a 26-year-old first-year grad student from San Francisco, is having one of her short stories critiqued for the first time. Bender listens intently as her 11 fellow writers, seated at two pushed-together conference tables, take turns holding forth in a sort of literary round robin: The combination of "being plain and somewhat fanciful in style" works well, says one. The transition of one character seemed too abrupt, says another.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For someone undergoing her baptism of fire, Aimee Bender doesn't look nervous. The weekly graduate fiction writing workshop at UC Irvine is in progress, and Bender, a 26-year-old from San Francisco, is having one of her short stories critiqued for the first time. She listens intently as 11 fellow writers, seated at pushed-together conference tables, take turns holding forth in a sort of literary round robin: The combination of "being plain and somewhat fanciful in style" works well, says one.
MAGAZINE
August 9, 1987 | SUSAN SQUIRE, Susan Squire's last article for the Los Angeles Times Magazine was on author Bret Easton Ellis.
IT'S ANOTHER TUESDAY-afternoon meeting of the fiction-writing workshop at the University of California at Irvine, and 11 MFA candidates are engaged in one of their creative rituals: shredding a colleague's prose. Today, Feb. 17, 1987, the colleague is 23-year-old Michael Chabon (SHAY-bun), whose Byron-esque curls and narrow, mobile face make him seem easily bruised.
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