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Vasili Mitrokhin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2004 | From the Washington Post
Vasili Mitrokhin, the KGB archivist who for 12 years secretly made notes from the Russian spy agency files until he defected to Britain in 1992, has died. He was 81. Mitrokhin died of pneumonia Jan. 23, the British government announced. His handwritten notes were hidden in his shoes, buried in milk containers under the floorboards of his dacha or under his back garden, and were smuggled out of Russia by British agents in six trunks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2004 | From the Washington Post
Vasili Mitrokhin, the KGB archivist who for 12 years secretly made notes from the Russian spy agency files until he defected to Britain in 1992, has died. He was 81. Mitrokhin died of pneumonia Jan. 23, the British government announced. His handwritten notes were hidden in his shoes, buried in milk containers under the floorboards of his dacha or under his back garden, and were smuggled out of Russia by British agents in six trunks.
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NEWS
September 24, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most knew him as a Democratic Party activist who was deeply involved in California politics during the Jimmy Carter years. He rubbed shoulders with the party elite, including Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. and U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston. During the 1976 presidential campaign, he described taking part in a three-hour strategy session with Cranston, Brown and presidential hopeful Carter at the Pacific Hotel near Los Angeles International Airport.
BOOKS
October 24, 1999 | TIMOTHY NAFTALI, Timothy Naftali is the co-author of "One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958-1964" and director of the Presidential Recordings Project, Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia
History is subversive of authoritarian regimes. It invites comparisons, suggests paths not taken and can inspire expectations. If they cannot tame the past, police states do what they can to destroy it. During the era of superpower detente, a dissident within the ranks of the KGB made the courageous decision to create an independent history of that organization.
BOOKS
October 24, 1999 | TIMOTHY NAFTALI, Timothy Naftali is the co-author of "One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958-1964" and director of the Presidential Recordings Project, Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia
History is subversive of authoritarian regimes. It invites comparisons, suggests paths not taken and can inspire expectations. If they cannot tame the past, police states do what they can to destroy it. During the era of superpower detente, a dissident within the ranks of the KGB made the courageous decision to create an independent history of that organization.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | Times Wire Services
Britain revealed Monday that it had suspected for half a century that "traitor granny" Melita Norwood was a Soviet spy, but it had never interviewed her because it didn't want to jeopardize other investigations. Home Secretary Jack Straw, under pressure to reveal the facts about Norwood and a second Soviet spy unmasked by defector Vasili Mitrokhin, said he had first learned of her activities in December 1998.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
The KGB archives revealing that an 87-year-old British woman was a long-serving Soviet spy also say a former Scotland Yard officer served as a KGB messenger in the 1970s, the Sunday Times reported. The revelations come from a book being published this month, the newspaper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Soviet spy testified at a congressional hearing in Los Angeles on Monday that Russian intelligence operatives placed weapons and communications caches--perhaps even small nuclear devices--in California and other states as part of a plan to destabilize the United States through sabotage.
WORLD
December 2, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
An Italian KGB expert who had warned poisoned Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko that his life might be in danger has a "significant quantity" of radioactive polonium-210 in his body, authorities said Friday. British health officials also said they had detected a small quantity in a close relative of Litvinenko. Neither has shown signs of illness.
OPINION
January 12, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
A little bit of history's unfinished business lurched unexpectedly out of the shadows this week. Philip Agee, the first -- and some believe the only -- CIA agent to betray the United States for ideological (rather than pecuniary) reasons, died of natural causes in a Havana hospital at age 72.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most knew him as a Democratic Party activist who was deeply involved in California politics during the Jimmy Carter years. He rubbed shoulders with the party elite, including Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. and U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston. During the 1976 presidential campaign, he described taking part in a three-hour strategy session with Cranston, Brown and presidential hopeful Carter at the Pacific Hotel near Los Angeles International Airport.
OPINION
December 19, 1999 | David Wise, David Wise is the author of "Cassidy's Run: The Secret Spy War Over Nerve Gas," to be published in March
Every intelligence agency would like to be a fly on the wall to listen in on its adversaries. Two weeks ago, it was discovered that Russia's spy agency had literally accomplished that feat by placing a bug, albeit electronic, on the wall of a State Department conference room.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009 | By Tim Rutten
From Erskine Childers and Joseph Conrad to Ian Fleming and John le Carre, some of the last century's most gripping -- not to mention, entertaining -- fiction has had its roots in the real world of espionage. The history of spying, on the other hand, is frequently a dicey proposition. Even authors with the best of intentions can be misled or partially blinded by their own loyalties or enthusiasms. When secrets are disclosed, prudent readers never can be wholly confident that they've been told the whole truth.
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