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Vasily Pichul

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April 28, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Little Vera, unhappy at last. And at first. And in between. But how else is a bored, nervy 18-year-old supposed to feel, living at home, nagged at every turn? Sassy, sensual Vera is the second thing the camera lingers upon as the startling Soviet film "Little Vera" opens. (It's at the Fine Arts.) The first shot is a long appraising pan along the depressing seaport city of Zhdanov, smoggy, industrial, grim. Across its polluted river is the cramped cement-blockhouse apartment Vera shares with her parents, indistinguishable from every other apartment building in their row. Next, director Vasily Pichul shifts our attention to leggy Vera, pensively eating cherries on the apartment's ratty balcony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Little Vera, unhappy at last. And at first. And in between. But how else is a bored, nervy 18-year-old supposed to feel, living at home, nagged at every turn? Sassy, sensual Vera is the second thing the camera lingers upon as the startling Soviet film "Little Vera" opens. (It's at the Fine Arts.) The first shot is a long appraising pan along the depressing seaport city of Zhdanov, smoggy, industrial, grim. Across its polluted river is the cramped cement-blockhouse apartment Vera shares with her parents, indistinguishable from every other apartment building in their row. Next, director Vasily Pichul shifts our attention to leggy Vera, pensively eating cherries on the apartment's ratty balcony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988 | GERALD PEARY
Glasnost for the Soviet cinema began promisingly with the dramatic release in 1986 of the long-suppressed, controversial films, "Commissar" (1967) and "Theme" (1979), shelved with finality during the Brezhnev era. Still, those pictures were made a long time ago. Would Gorbachev's rhetoric encouraging internal criticism of Soviet life actually be carried out in the newest cinema?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988 | GERALD PEARY
Glasnost for the Soviet cinema began promisingly with the dramatic release in 1986 of the long-suppressed, controversial films, "Commissar" (1967) and "Theme" (1979), shelved with finality during the Brezhnev era. Still, those pictures were made a long time ago. Would Gorbachev's rhetoric encouraging internal criticism of Soviet life actually be carried out in the newest cinema?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | ANNETTE INSDORF, Insdorf is professor and director of undergraduate film studies at Columbia University. and
A sullen, sluttish teen-ager with streaked hair is ignoring her parents, popping fruit into her mouth as they question where she got a $20 bill. She rips it in half, flushes the bill down the toilet, and--clad in a miniskirt--escapes to a pulsating disco with friends. If this were the opening of an American or French film, viewers would hardly raise an eyebrow. But because this sequence begins a Soviet film--"Little Vera"--eyebrows have been arching quite high. From Moscow to film festivals including Venice (where it won the Critics' Prize)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON
Want the real insider's view of the Soviet Union today? Steel yourself and see "Little Vera." As this breakthrough Soviet film unreels its shockingly frank portrait of real life Over There, Americans may not know where to look first. Do they keep their eyes glued to its young star Natalya Negoda, a free-spirited bombshell, doing things that teen-agers have reportedly been doing for years--but doing them in an decidedly uninhibited fashion in a Soviet movie? Or do they check out Vera's startling milieu, a parade of disaffected young people and their ineffective parents who've taken to dope and alcohol, respectively, to dull their stifled, predictable lives?
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