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Vaslav Nijinsky

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March 14, 1999 | JANICE ROSS, Janice Ross, a dance critic and historian, is on the dance faculty at Stanford University
The dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky was one of the most celebrated, brilliant and mad artists of the 20th century. He seemed to confirm the link that many believe exists between madness and artistry because both involve a certain unhinging of one's imagination from immediate reality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By David Ng
It's hard today to imagine a ballet causing an audience to riot, but that's what happened 100 years ago when the well-heeled Parisian spectators at the Théâtre des Champs Elysées revolted against Igor Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring. "  "Rite" debuted May 29, 1913, and its centenary will be marked during the next few weeks by music groups all over the world. In Southern California, the Pacific Symphony will pay tribute in a series of three concerts starting Thursday at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rehearsals are under way in Iowa City, Iowa, for a new production--utilizing the original "lost" choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky--of Stravinsky's 1913 ballet "Le Sacre du Printemps." Millicent Hodson is overseeing the reconstruction of Nijinsky's staging, which was performed only a few times after its premiere on May 29, 1913, and was eventually replaced by the 1920 version by Leonid Massine (and numerous others).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2009 | Debra Levine
One hundred years ago, on May 19, 1909, Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes debuted in France and redefined dance for the 20th century. Toiling for le tout Paris in front of the hot footlights of the Theatre du Chatelet were ballet superstars Vaslav Nijinsky and Anna Pavlova -- artists whose names resonate around the world. Among this galaxy of luminaries, however, only one was destined to achieve his fame in Los Angeles, where today he is all but unknown.
BOOKS
May 26, 1991
I was frankly puzzled to see a recent book of mine, "Vaslav Nijinsky: A Leap Into Madness," described (by reviewer Alex Raksin, March 3) as "psychobiography." Nowhere in the text or on the dust jacket is this term used. The work is a straightforward biography, based on documents and eye-witness reports. Its purpose, as the preface makes clear, is to explore "the origins, manifestations, and treatment of Vaslav Nijinsky's madness." I was happy to read that the reviewer felt "moved" by my descriptions of the great dancer's mental illness.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | ZAN DUBIN, Zan Dubin covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
When mental illness began to bring a premature end to Vaslav Nijinsky's career early this century, the renowned ballet dancer turned to visual art for self-expression. Unfortunately, until recently his works were dismissed as the idle, worthless doodlings of a madman. "The drawings are psychopathic charts," wrote American painter Marsden Hartley in the early 1940s, "and that is all that can be said of them."
BOOKS
March 3, 1991 | Alex Raksin
VASLAV NIJINSKY: A Leap Into Madness by Peter Ostwald (Lyle Stuart: $19.95; 358 pp.). In the late 1970s, psychobiography's "science of personality" promised to demystify the great figures of history (and thus history itself) far more effectively than traditional "literary" biography.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004 | Lewis Segal
In life, Sergei Diaghilev and Romola de Pulszky both loved the great virtuoso dancer Vaslav Nijinsky and thought they'd won him. But Diaghilev lost him to Pulszky, who married Nijinsky in 1913, and she, in turn, lost him to mental illness only six years later. These events formed the narrative spine of "Nijinsky," a two-act dance drama performed by the Hamburg Ballet at the Orange County Performing Arts Center earlier this month.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | ANN CONWAY
S tay on the grass. That was the mandate at Sunday's tea at the immense Italian villa in South Laguna Beach that belongs to Severin Wunderman, founder of the Severin Wunderman Museum in Irvine. Guests could sip water under the rose-smothered gazebo, on a patio perched above the roaring sea, but tours of the $10-million Mediterranean digs were forbidden. In fact, if guests even came close to a stairway leading to Wunderman's front door, security guards shooed them away. "What?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Although he gave his last performance in 1917, and no known film exists of his dancing, Vaslav Nijinsky remains an endlessly fascinating symbol of the 20th century artist as genius, celebrity, sexual outlaw and madman. Born in Kiev of Polish parents in 1890, he danced for only a decade and spent more than half his life in a mental asylum before he died in London in 1950.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004 | Lewis Segal
In life, Sergei Diaghilev and Romola de Pulszky both loved the great virtuoso dancer Vaslav Nijinsky and thought they'd won him. But Diaghilev lost him to Pulszky, who married Nijinsky in 1913, and she, in turn, lost him to mental illness only six years later. These events formed the narrative spine of "Nijinsky," a two-act dance drama performed by the Hamburg Ballet at the Orange County Performing Arts Center earlier this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2004 | Daniel Gesmer, Special to The Times
Last summer and fall, local audiences saw four ballets that Vaslav Nijinsky either choreographed or originally danced. But the Ballets Russes legend himself spent just one week in Los Angeles, in December 1916 while on a U.S. tour. Charlie Chaplin saw him perform at least twice at Clune's Auditorium and visited him backstage between acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Although he gave his last performance in 1917, and no known film exists of his dancing, Vaslav Nijinsky remains an endlessly fascinating symbol of the 20th century artist as genius, celebrity, sexual outlaw and madman. Born in Kiev of Polish parents in 1890, he danced for only a decade and spent more than half his life in a mental asylum before he died in London in 1950.
BOOKS
March 14, 1999 | JANICE ROSS, Janice Ross, a dance critic and historian, is on the dance faculty at Stanford University
The dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky was one of the most celebrated, brilliant and mad artists of the 20th century. He seemed to confirm the link that many believe exists between madness and artistry because both involve a certain unhinging of one's imagination from immediate reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Eighty years ago, the great Polish-Ukrainian ballet star Vaslav Nijinsky gave his last public performance, already victimized by the mental illness that would consume him until his death in 1950. No films exist of his dancing, but his legendary blend of technique and sensuality left every male dancer after him in his shadow.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | ANN CONWAY
S tay on the grass. That was the mandate at Sunday's tea at the immense Italian villa in South Laguna Beach that belongs to Severin Wunderman, founder of the Severin Wunderman Museum in Irvine. Guests could sip water under the rose-smothered gazebo, on a patio perched above the roaring sea, but tours of the $10-million Mediterranean digs were forbidden. In fact, if guests even came close to a stairway leading to Wunderman's front door, security guards shooed them away. "What?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Eighty years ago, the great Polish-Ukrainian ballet star Vaslav Nijinsky gave his last public performance, already victimized by the mental illness that would consume him until his death in 1950. No films exist of his dancing, but his legendary blend of technique and sensuality left every male dancer after him in his shadow.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By David Ng
It's hard today to imagine a ballet causing an audience to riot, but that's what happened 100 years ago when the well-heeled Parisian spectators at the Théâtre des Champs Elysées revolted against Igor Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring. "  "Rite" debuted May 29, 1913, and its centenary will be marked during the next few weeks by music groups all over the world. In Southern California, the Pacific Symphony will pay tribute in a series of three concerts starting Thursday at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | ZAN DUBIN, Zan Dubin covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
When mental illness began to bring a premature end to Vaslav Nijinsky's career early this century, the renowned ballet dancer turned to visual art for self-expression. Unfortunately, until recently his works were dismissed as the idle, worthless doodlings of a madman. "The drawings are psychopathic charts," wrote American painter Marsden Hartley in the early 1940s, "and that is all that can be said of them."
BOOKS
May 26, 1991
I was frankly puzzled to see a recent book of mine, "Vaslav Nijinsky: A Leap Into Madness," described (by reviewer Alex Raksin, March 3) as "psychobiography." Nowhere in the text or on the dust jacket is this term used. The work is a straightforward biography, based on documents and eye-witness reports. Its purpose, as the preface makes clear, is to explore "the origins, manifestations, and treatment of Vaslav Nijinsky's madness." I was happy to read that the reviewer felt "moved" by my descriptions of the great dancer's mental illness.
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