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Vasquez Rocks County Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1999 | ROB O'NEIL
Stargazers will be able to take in a full night of meteor watching Thursday at Vasquez Rocks County Park in Agua Dulce. The park normally closes at sunset but will remain open all night for the Perseid meteor shower, which occurs every August. Paula Reynosa, L.A. County park ranger, will conduct a program and provide commentary. "It should be beautiful because there will not be a full moon," she said. "The meteors should show up real well."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1999 | ROB O'NEIL
Stargazers will be able to take in a full night of meteor watching Thursday at Vasquez Rocks County Park in Agua Dulce. The park normally closes at sunset but will remain open all night for the Perseid meteor shower, which occurs every August. Paula Reynosa, L.A. County park ranger, will conduct a program and provide commentary. "It should be beautiful because there will not be a full moon," she said. "The meteors should show up real well."
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TRAVEL
January 2, 1994 | JOHN McKINNEY
Chances are, you've seen the rocks on TV and the big screen many times--from old Westerns to modern sci-fi films. And you've probably seen Vasquez Rocks while motoring along the Antelope Valley Freeway; the famed formations are but a couple of miles from California 14. But the best place to see the Southland's most famous geological silhouette is Vasquez Rocks County Park Natural Area in Agua Dulce. Hiking trails circle the rocks, which are not only enjoyable to view, but fun to climb upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1999 | JOHN CORRIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His name is Fred Koegler, but out here he's known as the Lord of the Rock. He's the way you hope to look at 57--lean and strong. During the winter he's a track and cross-country coach at Verdugo Hills High School in Tujunga. Summers he spends as a law enforcement ranger at Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite National Park. Sorry, you don't get to be called Lord of the Rock working an office job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1995
Your story "Gripping Drama: Movie Paint Job Upsets Stoney Point Climbers" (April 7) reports the outrage felt by rock climbers over the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department's authorizing the painting of sandstone boulders at Stoney Point Park to make them more photogenic for Hollywood movie filming. As a San Fernando Valley resident who takes my small children on hikes in this park, I was dismayed by this abuse of what, despite much trash and graffiti, is still a wonderful park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like some modern-day caveman, Jason Lems adjusts his sunglasses and motions toward the Vasquez Rocks--twisted, angry stone formations that have been the Santa Clarita Valley's loneliest landmarks for 20 million years. "There," says the 21-year-old park ranger, pointing toward a half-finished structure the color of cartoon orange. "That's Fred's house. Barney's going to live right next door." He's talking, of course, about Fred Flintstone and his pint-sized pal, Barney Rubble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1999 | JOHN CORRIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His name is Fred Koegler, but out here he's known as the Lord of the Rock. He's the way you hope to look at 57--lean and strong. During the winter he's a track and cross-country coach at Verdugo Hills High School in Tujunga. Summers he spends as a law enforcement ranger at Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite National Park. Sorry, you don't get to be called Lord of the Rock working an office job.
SPORTS
October 21, 1988 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Let's go back a few years. It's 45 million B.C. Volcanoes in what is now Agua Dulce burp lava onto the desert floor, forming sandstone hills. Time flies. Twenty-million years later, an earthquake rips the hills from the earth and flips them over like pancakes, thereby doing a great service for future generations of Western bandits, Hollywood set decorators and assorted rock climbers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1988
As other-worldly as it looks, Vasquez Rocks County Park is a hideaway very near Los Angeles. Tucked away in Escondido Canyon near Soledad Canyon, about 10 miles north of Newhall it is hidden enough that it was once used by the famed Mexican bandit Tiburcio Vasquez, after whom it is named. Camping and picnicking are reasons to go there, but the main attraction is the park's dramitic rock outcroppings, which are good for climbng, scrambling, photographing or just plain sightseeing.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | DAVID COLKER and DAVID WHARTON
If your out-of-town guests can't make it up to Death Valley on their summer trip, drive them out to our own pocket of desolation--Vasquez Rocks County Park in Saugus. There is little more to this desert-like, 745-acre park than scrub brush, dusty trails and rocks. But what rocks! The spectacular rock outcroppings in the park resemble giant ocean waves that were frozen in time just as they started to break.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1995
Your story "Gripping Drama: Movie Paint Job Upsets Stoney Point Climbers" (April 7) reports the outrage felt by rock climbers over the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department's authorizing the painting of sandstone boulders at Stoney Point Park to make them more photogenic for Hollywood movie filming. As a San Fernando Valley resident who takes my small children on hikes in this park, I was dismayed by this abuse of what, despite much trash and graffiti, is still a wonderful park.
TRAVEL
January 2, 1994 | JOHN McKINNEY
Chances are, you've seen the rocks on TV and the big screen many times--from old Westerns to modern sci-fi films. And you've probably seen Vasquez Rocks while motoring along the Antelope Valley Freeway; the famed formations are but a couple of miles from California 14. But the best place to see the Southland's most famous geological silhouette is Vasquez Rocks County Park Natural Area in Agua Dulce. Hiking trails circle the rocks, which are not only enjoyable to view, but fun to climb upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like some modern-day caveman, Jason Lems adjusts his sunglasses and motions toward the Vasquez Rocks--twisted, angry stone formations that have been the Santa Clarita Valley's loneliest landmarks for 20 million years. "There," says the 21-year-old park ranger, pointing toward a half-finished structure the color of cartoon orange. "That's Fred's house. Barney's going to live right next door." He's talking, of course, about Fred Flintstone and his pint-sized pal, Barney Rubble.
SPORTS
October 21, 1988 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Let's go back a few years. It's 45 million B.C. Volcanoes in what is now Agua Dulce burp lava onto the desert floor, forming sandstone hills. Time flies. Twenty-million years later, an earthquake rips the hills from the earth and flips them over like pancakes, thereby doing a great service for future generations of Western bandits, Hollywood set decorators and assorted rock climbers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2001 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood isn't the only place where they have star parties. Saturday night at Vasquez Rocks County Park in Agua Dulce, the Local Group Astronomy Club of the Santa Clarita Valley--a group of amateurs who regularly get together--will set up a dozen telescopes and invite the public to join them for an evening of star watching.
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