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Vassily Aksyonov

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November 7, 1999 | DONALD FANGER, Donald Fanger is the author of "The Creation of Nikolai Gogol" and writes frequently on modern Russian literature. He is Harry Levin Research Professor of Literature at Harvard University
Endlessly inventive, irrepressible, un-classifiable, Vassily Aksyonov has been the bad boy of Russian literature for nearly four decades, thumbing his nose at good taste and respectability and celebrating freedom by uninhibitedly practicing it. The hero of his newest novel, Sasha Korbach, is the same kind of bad boy, a dissident icon of the Soviet '60s, founder of a theater troupe called "The Buffoons," bard, actor, director, screenwriter and thorn in the side of the cultural authorities.
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November 7, 1999 | DONALD FANGER, Donald Fanger is the author of "The Creation of Nikolai Gogol" and writes frequently on modern Russian literature. He is Harry Levin Research Professor of Literature at Harvard University
Endlessly inventive, irrepressible, un-classifiable, Vassily Aksyonov has been the bad boy of Russian literature for nearly four decades, thumbing his nose at good taste and respectability and celebrating freedom by uninhibitedly practicing it. The hero of his newest novel, Sasha Korbach, is the same kind of bad boy, a dissident icon of the Soviet '60s, founder of a theater troupe called "The Buffoons," bard, actor, director, screenwriter and thorn in the side of the cultural authorities.
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BOOKS
August 13, 1989 | Zinovy Zinik, Zinik's recent novel, "The Mushroom-Picker," was published this year by St. Martin's Press. and
Vassily Aksyonov tells his story of Moscow life of the 1970s as an adventure yarn about a group of dissident photographers who, in spite of KGB schemings, produce an "underground" photography album , "Say Cheese!" and, having failed to publish it officially, smuggle it to the West.
BOOKS
August 7, 1994 | Adam Hochschild, Adam Hochschild's most recent book is "The Unquiet Ghost: Russians Remember Stalin" (Viking Penguin). His earlier "Half the Way Home: a Memoir of Father and Son" was recently reprinted as a Penguin paperback
Near the end of her memoirs of Stalin's gulag, the writer Eugenia Ginzburg describes an extraordinary scene. She had just finished many years' imprisonment in Ko lyma--the harshest, coldest, most feared region of the vast labor camp system, in the far northeast corner of Siberia, not far from Alaska. Like most newly-released prisoners, Ginzburg had to remain in internal exile for some years more. Her husband had also vanished into the gulag, and, while she was in prison, one of her two sons had died in the siege of Leningrad.
BOOKS
August 7, 1994 | Adam Hochschild, Adam Hochschild's most recent book is "The Unquiet Ghost: Russians Remember Stalin" (Viking Penguin). His earlier "Half the Way Home: a Memoir of Father and Son" was recently reprinted as a Penguin paperback
Near the end of her memoirs of Stalin's gulag, the writer Eugenia Ginzburg describes an extraordinary scene. She had just finished many years' imprisonment in Ko lyma--the harshest, coldest, most feared region of the vast labor camp system, in the far northeast corner of Siberia, not far from Alaska. Like most newly-released prisoners, Ginzburg had to remain in internal exile for some years more. Her husband had also vanished into the gulag, and, while she was in prison, one of her two sons had died in the siege of Leningrad.
MAGAZINE
September 27, 1992 | BILL THOMAS, Bill Thomas, a regular contributor to this magazine, is the co-author of "Red Tape: Adventure Capitalism in the New Russia," to be published by Dutton next month. His last article was about magazine editor Tina Brown.
"WELCOME!" RUSSIAN novelist and playwright Vassily Aksyonov tells me as he swings open the door to his Washington townhouse. Tatyana Tolstaya, the short-story writer, has already arrived and the two friends are reminiscing about old times and new in the ex-U.S.S.R. "So much has happened in the past year," Tolstaya exclaims. "It's hard to keep up." Aksyonov's living room is brightly decorated with artworks and Russian posters advertising his plays.
BOOKS
June 28, 1987 | Richard Eder
Vassily Aksyonov, whose novel, "The Burn," is one of the masterpieces of dissident Soviet literature, has been living in this country for the last half-dozen years. He is not really qualified to write about the United States. He is marvelously well qualified to write about himself in the United States. "In Search of Melancholy Baby" does too much of the first and too little of the second. It takes a long time for an emigre to arrive; particularly, an emigre writer.
BOOKS
March 12, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
Probably best known for his recent novel, "The Burn," Vassily Aksyonov was forced to emigrate from the Soviet Union in 1979 after attempting to publish a literary anthology free of censorship. "In Search of Melancholy Baby," a work of nonfiction, records Aksyonov's observations of life in the United States interspersed with memories of his past. "As an 'almost American' I see more than the bright windows of my new home," he writes, "I see its mildewed corners as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Actors, singers, dancers, authors and other artists crowded into a House hearing today to rally support for the National Endowment for the Arts and defend their work from "a climate of fear." The list of witnesses testifying to the House Appropriations Interior subcommittee included actresses Jessica Tandy, Jane Alexander, Ruby Dee and Jane Curtin.
MAGAZINE
September 27, 1992 | BILL THOMAS, Bill Thomas, a regular contributor to this magazine, is the co-author of "Red Tape: Adventure Capitalism in the New Russia," to be published by Dutton next month. His last article was about magazine editor Tina Brown.
"WELCOME!" RUSSIAN novelist and playwright Vassily Aksyonov tells me as he swings open the door to his Washington townhouse. Tatyana Tolstaya, the short-story writer, has already arrived and the two friends are reminiscing about old times and new in the ex-U.S.S.R. "So much has happened in the past year," Tolstaya exclaims. "It's hard to keep up." Aksyonov's living room is brightly decorated with artworks and Russian posters advertising his plays.
BOOKS
August 13, 1989 | Zinovy Zinik, Zinik's recent novel, "The Mushroom-Picker," was published this year by St. Martin's Press. and
Vassily Aksyonov tells his story of Moscow life of the 1970s as an adventure yarn about a group of dissident photographers who, in spite of KGB schemings, produce an "underground" photography album , "Say Cheese!" and, having failed to publish it officially, smuggle it to the West.
BOOKS
March 12, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
Probably best known for his recent novel, "The Burn," Vassily Aksyonov was forced to emigrate from the Soviet Union in 1979 after attempting to publish a literary anthology free of censorship. "In Search of Melancholy Baby," a work of nonfiction, records Aksyonov's observations of life in the United States interspersed with memories of his past. "As an 'almost American' I see more than the bright windows of my new home," he writes, "I see its mildewed corners as well.
BOOKS
June 28, 1987 | Richard Eder
Vassily Aksyonov, whose novel, "The Burn," is one of the masterpieces of dissident Soviet literature, has been living in this country for the last half-dozen years. He is not really qualified to write about the United States. He is marvelously well qualified to write about himself in the United States. "In Search of Melancholy Baby" does too much of the first and too little of the second. It takes a long time for an emigre to arrive; particularly, an emigre writer.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
Earlier this week, The Times reported on the death of Michael Henry Heim, 69, one of the leading figures of the small, unseen and largely unknown circle of men and women who translate the world's literature into English. Heim, a UCLA scholar, spoke six language fluently and could read six more, and he translated works by authors such as Gunter Grass, Bertolt Brecht, Milan Kundera, Thomas Mann and Anton Chekhov into English. But what the world didn't know until his death is that Heim had privately funded   dozens more works by other translators.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Imagine being a committed party-liner, married to an important Communist Party official, and being arrested on trumped-up charges for having been in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong person. And imagine spending the next 18 years imprisoned--the first two in a Moscow jail in solitary confinement and at least 12 of the last 16 in the gulag. Even Kafka could not have come up with a more cruel scenario.
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