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September 17, 1990 | Reuters
The head of security for deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega on Sunday abandoned Panama's Vatican Embassy, where he had taken refuge after last December's U.S. invasion, and immediately went into hiding, Panamanian officials said. The escape of Eliecer Gaytan, who was Noriega's chief bodyguard, prompted a full-scale manhunt by U.S. and Panamanian authorities, a local radio station said. Television news reports showed the embassy ringed by American troops and Panamanian police.
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WORLD
March 15, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Vatican said Friday that it had no intention of shutting its embassy in Iraq if war breaks out, although other governments are closing their missions and evacuating staff. A statement by papal spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls called it a "time-honored tradition" that Vatican diplomats remain near the people they are serving "even in situations of extreme danger." A number of embassies in Baghdad are closing and the United Nations is evacuating expatriate staff in expectation of a U.S.
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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER and THOMAS B. ROSENSTEIL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than a week, the American military has been hurling a fury of scathing images and epithets at Manuel A. Noriega in a campaign clearly designed to demean and demonize the fallen Panama leader.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | Reuters
The head of security for deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega on Sunday abandoned Panama's Vatican Embassy, where he had taken refuge after last December's U.S. invasion, and immediately went into hiding, Panamanian officials said. The escape of Eliecer Gaytan, who was Noriega's chief bodyguard, prompted a full-scale manhunt by U.S. and Panamanian authorities, a local radio station said. Television news reports showed the embassy ringed by American troops and Panamanian police.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than three hours after U.S. troops began their invasion here Dec. 20, American officials were told where fugitive Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega was hiding but disregarded the information, according to a European diplomat who made the call. "In the third hour of the attack," the diplomat said, "he was two houses down (from the diplomat's home), in the flat of Vicki's grandmother" in a high-rise structure called Edificio Winston Churchill.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soft-pedaling its diplomatic differences with the United States, the Vatican said Saturday that it does not intend to help deposed dictator Manuel A. Noriega evade justice by granting him refuge in its embassy in Panama City. A communique from the Vatican's Secretariat of State one day after the Vatican criticized harassment by U.S. troops surrounding the embassy was a clear peace-seeking gesture, in the judgment of Vatican observers.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration is seeking to increase pressure on the Vatican to turn deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega over to the United States and plans to present new evidence of his alleged crimes to papal authorities in Rome, officials said Thursday. U.S.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The new government of Panama prepared murder charges Sunday against Manuel A. Noriega and took part in intense negotiations with the Vatican and the Bush Administration over the fate of the deposed dictator, who is holed up in the Vatican's embassy here. The impending charges, stemming from the deaths of 10 officers involved in an Oct. 3 military revolt against Noriega, were announced by Atty. Gen. Rogelio Cruz.
NEWS
December 26, 1989
Noriega U.S. officials are now saying that their prime goal is again to extradite ousted dictator Manuel A. Noriega, declaring flatly: "We want him. We want to try him." President Bush and his senior advisers spent Christmas Day discussing the ousted dictator's fate. American troops barricaded the Vatican embassy where Noriega has taken refuge and are searching all visitors. The Vatican's Dilemma Noriega's taking refuge in its embassy in Panama City poses a ticklish situation for the Vatican.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The surrender of Manuel A. Noriega was accomplished by extreme diplomatic pressures from Vatican representatives, who even told Noriega they might move their embassy and leave him alone in the compound surrounded by U.S. soldiers and an angry populace, according to sources in Panama and Washington. Papal Nuncio Jose Sebastian Laboa "painted a very dismal picture" for Noriega, a Western European diplomat said shortly after Noriega's surrender was announced Wednesday night.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than three hours after U.S. troops began their invasion here Dec. 20, American officials were told where fugitive Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega was hiding but disregarded the information, according to a European diplomat who made the call. "In the third hour of the attack," the diplomat said, "he was two houses down (from the diplomat's home), in the flat of Vicki's grandmother" in a high-rise structure called Edificio Winston Churchill.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For 11 days, dozens of officials and diplomats from the United States, the Vatican and Panama conferred around the clock while their advisers pored over constitutions, canon law, extradition treaties and legal precedents--all in an effort to end the agonizing standoff with deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega. But the crisis in Panama City ultimately became a contest of wills between two men--a self-proclaimed "maximum leader" and a gentle but stubborn Spanish-born priest.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The surrender of Manuel A. Noriega was accomplished by extreme diplomatic pressures from Vatican representatives, who even told Noriega they might move their embassy and leave him alone in the compound surrounded by U.S. soldiers and an angry populace, according to sources in Panama and Washington. Papal Nuncio Jose Sebastian Laboa "painted a very dismal picture" for Noriega, a Western European diplomat said shortly after Noriega's surrender was announced Wednesday night.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Panama strongman Manuel A. Noriega walked out of his sanctuary in the Vatican embassy in Panama City on Wednesday night and was quickly arrested by U.S. drug agents, President Bush announced. Ending a stalemate that began when he sought refuge in the embassy on Christmas Eve, Noriega was whisked out of his country aboard a U.S. Air Force C-130 transport bound for Homestead Air Force Base in south Florida. "At about 8:50 this evening, Gen. Noriega turned himself in to U.S.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 days after being overthrown in a U.S. military invasion and taking refuge in the Vatican embassy, Manuel A. Noriega lived a secluded, Spartan life, sealed off from the outside world by the reluctant host of his diplomatic sanctuary. Three times a day, the deposed dictator of Panama opened the door to his sweltering second-floor room in the Vatican nunciature, accepted a meal on a tray and shut himself in again, according to visitors to the embassy compound.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The new government of Panama prepared murder charges Sunday against Manuel A. Noriega and took part in intense negotiations with the Vatican and the Bush Administration over the fate of the deposed dictator, who is holed up in the Vatican's embassy here. The impending charges, stemming from the deaths of 10 officers involved in an Oct. 3 military revolt against Noriega, were announced by Atty. Gen. Rogelio Cruz.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For 11 days, dozens of officials and diplomats from the United States, the Vatican and Panama conferred around the clock while their advisers pored over constitutions, canon law, extradition treaties and legal precedents--all in an effort to end the agonizing standoff with deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega. But the crisis in Panama City ultimately became a contest of wills between two men--a self-proclaimed "maximum leader" and a gentle but stubborn Spanish-born priest.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush said Sunday that he is pleased that Manuel A. Noriega sought refuge in the Vatican embassy in Panama, declaring that it means that the dictator's "reign of terror is over." But the wily general's move poses potentially awkward problems for his pursuers. In a worst-case scenario, officials said, it could produce a long and embarrassing diplomatic stalemate that might result in his escape to another country.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soft-pedaling its diplomatic differences with the United States, the Vatican said Saturday that it does not intend to help deposed dictator Manuel A. Noriega evade justice by granting him refuge in its embassy in Panama City. A communique from the Vatican's Secretariat of State one day after the Vatican criticized harassment by U.S. troops surrounding the embassy was a clear peace-seeking gesture, in the judgment of Vatican observers.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama's Roman Catholic bishops asked the Vatican on Saturday to end its diplomatic sanctuary for former dictator Manuel A. Noriega and hand him over for trial in the United States or Panama for what they call "abominable crimes." In a letter to Pope John Paul II, the 12 bishops said that the possibility of a negotiated exile for Noriega, who has been holed up in the Vatican embassy here since Christmas Eve, has "morally impeded" a peaceful and orderly return to democracy in Panama.
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