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January 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pope John Paul II consecrated 13 new bishops during a Mass in St. Peter's Basilica. Among the 13 were French-born Msgr. Jean Louis Tauran, the Vatican's new secretary for foreign affairs. The new bishops included six other Europeans, one each from Asia and the Middle East, and two each from Africa and Latin America.
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NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pope John Paul II consecrated 13 new bishops during a Mass in St. Peter's Basilica. Among the 13 were French-born Msgr. Jean Louis Tauran, the Vatican's new secretary for foreign affairs. The new bishops included six other Europeans, one each from Asia and the Middle East, and two each from Africa and Latin America.
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NEWS
March 25, 1987
Judicial officials plan to ask the Vatican to extradite Archbishop Paul C. Marcinkus and two other Vatican Bank officials in Italy's worst post-World War II banking scandal, Italian news agencies reported. Quoting unnamed sources, the agencies said the Justice Ministry this week received the formal extradition request from judges in Milan investigating the 1982 collapse of the Banco Ambrosiano and its dealings with the Vatican Bank.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major changing of the guard at the Vatican, Cardinal Agostino Casaroli, a patient and polyglot prelate who became one of the world's most traveled diplomats, retired Saturday as secretary of state. Pope John Paul II immediately named another Italian, Archbishop Angelo Sodano, who had been Casaroli's deputy, as his successor, thereby assuring continuity of Vatican foreign policy and preserving geopolitical balance in the Curia.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | Associated Press
An arrest warrant has been issued for Archbishop Paul Marcinkus, the American who heads the Vatican bank, in connection with Italy's worst financial scandal since World War II, authorities said Wednesday. The 1982 collapse of Banco Ambrosiano has cost the Vatican $250 million. A judge investigating the Ambrosiano case told a reporter that the warrant charges Marcinkus, who has also served as bodyguard for Pope John Paul II, as "an accessory to fraudulent bankruptcy" in the case.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The surrender of Manuel A. Noriega was accomplished by extreme diplomatic pressures from Vatican representatives, who even told Noriega they might move their embassy and leave him alone in the compound surrounded by U.S. soldiers and an angry populace, according to sources in Panama and Washington. Papal Nuncio Jose Sebastian Laboa "painted a very dismal picture" for Noriega, a Western European diplomat said shortly after Noriega's surrender was announced Wednesday night.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka, who presided over the largest closing of Roman Catholic churches in U.S. history, will leave the archdiocese of Detroit to take a top financial post in Rome, the Vatican announced. Pope John Paul II named Szoka, 62, currently the head of the nation's fifth-largest archdiocese, as president of the Vatican's Prefecture for Economic Affairs. Last year, Szoka ordered 35 parishes in Detroit closed because of sharply declining membership.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archbishop Agostino Cacciavillan, a veteran Vatican diplomat, has been named papal envoy to the United States, the Vatican announced. Pope John Paul II appointed the 63-year-old Italian to succeed Archbishop Pio Laghi, 68, recently transferred to Rome to head the Congregation for Catholic Education. Cacciavillan has been serving as envoy to India and Nepal. One of the tasks of a nuncio is to advise the Pope on the appointment of bishops.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major changing of the guard at the Vatican, Cardinal Agostino Casaroli, a patient and polyglot prelate who became one of the world's most traveled diplomats, retired Saturday as secretary of state. Pope John Paul II immediately named another Italian, Archbishop Angelo Sodano, who had been Casaroli's deputy, as his successor, thereby assuring continuity of Vatican foreign policy and preserving geopolitical balance in the Curia.
NEWS
July 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Italy's highest court Friday threw out arrest warrants for U.S.-born Archbishop Paul C. Marcinkus and two other Vatican bank officials charged in the nation's worst post-World War II banking scandal. "I am satisfied that the court allowed the appeal proposed by the defense," said Adolfo Gatti, the lawyer who represented the Vatican in a five-month legal battle that strained relations between the Roman Catholic Church and the Italian government.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archbishop Agostino Cacciavillan, a veteran Vatican diplomat, has been named papal envoy to the United States, the Vatican announced. Pope John Paul II appointed the 63-year-old Italian to succeed Archbishop Pio Laghi, 68, recently transferred to Rome to head the Congregation for Catholic Education. Cacciavillan has been serving as envoy to India and Nepal. One of the tasks of a nuncio is to advise the Pope on the appointment of bishops.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka, who presided over the largest closing of Roman Catholic churches in U.S. history, will leave the archdiocese of Detroit to take a top financial post in Rome, the Vatican announced. Pope John Paul II named Szoka, 62, currently the head of the nation's fifth-largest archdiocese, as president of the Vatican's Prefecture for Economic Affairs. Last year, Szoka ordered 35 parishes in Detroit closed because of sharply declining membership.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The surrender of Manuel A. Noriega was accomplished by extreme diplomatic pressures from Vatican representatives, who even told Noriega they might move their embassy and leave him alone in the compound surrounded by U.S. soldiers and an angry populace, according to sources in Panama and Washington. Papal Nuncio Jose Sebastian Laboa "painted a very dismal picture" for Noriega, a Western European diplomat said shortly after Noriega's surrender was announced Wednesday night.
NEWS
July 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Italy's highest court Friday threw out arrest warrants for U.S.-born Archbishop Paul C. Marcinkus and two other Vatican bank officials charged in the nation's worst post-World War II banking scandal. "I am satisfied that the court allowed the appeal proposed by the defense," said Adolfo Gatti, the lawyer who represented the Vatican in a five-month legal battle that strained relations between the Roman Catholic Church and the Italian government.
NEWS
March 25, 1987
Judicial officials plan to ask the Vatican to extradite Archbishop Paul C. Marcinkus and two other Vatican Bank officials in Italy's worst post-World War II banking scandal, Italian news agencies reported. Quoting unnamed sources, the agencies said the Justice Ministry this week received the formal extradition request from judges in Milan investigating the 1982 collapse of the Banco Ambrosiano and its dealings with the Vatican Bank.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | Associated Press
An arrest warrant has been issued for Archbishop Paul Marcinkus, the American who heads the Vatican bank, in connection with Italy's worst financial scandal since World War II, authorities said Wednesday. The 1982 collapse of Banco Ambrosiano has cost the Vatican $250 million. A judge investigating the Ambrosiano case told a reporter that the warrant charges Marcinkus, who has also served as bodyguard for Pope John Paul II, as "an accessory to fraudulent bankruptcy" in the case.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | JACKSON DIEHL, The Washington Post
Parliament enacted a landmark law on Wednesday legalizing the Roman Catholic Church for the first time under Communist rule and restoring the property and privileges stripped from it in the years since the end of World War II in 1945. The law, which came after years of negotiations between the church and the leadership of Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski, represents the first full normalization of church-state relations in a Communist state and opens the way for Warsaw to become the first Communist government to establish diplomatic relations with the Vatican.
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