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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2011
UCLA Film and Television Archive rings in 2011 with its monthlong "Mixed Nuts: Vaudeville in Film" series. It pays homage to the comedic greats who hailed from vaudeville and found success in early talkies such as Jimmy Durante, W.C. Fields, Eddie Cantor, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Wheeler and Woolsey, and Charlotte Greenwood. The fun opens Friday at the Billy Wilder Theatre with the 1934 oddball musical comedy "Hollywood Party," featuring Durante, Laurel & Hardy and, yes, Mickey Mouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
Very little about Shakespeare's blood-soaked earliest tragedy lends itself to reimagining the play as an old-time variety show, and lacking the ingenuity to make the concept work Stella Adler Theatre Lab's “Titus Andronicus: A Vaudeville” is an overreach so ill-advised it seems to have been guided by some planet in retrograde. How else to explain a conceit that grafts clown makeup, kazoos, inept juggling and other carnivalesque imagery onto Shakespeare's relentlessly brutal text?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2010 | By Ramie Becker, Los Angeles Times
Vaudeville acts like plate spinners, sleight-of-hand artists, burlesque beauties and sword swallowers hardly seem like they have a place in an entertainment universe dominated by high-flying Cirque du Soleil and high-tech concert tours. The good old variety show is the stuff of a simpler era. But Stefan Haves has stripped back entertainment to the essentials of physical comedy and corporeal dexterity in a bid for an astonishing night out. The former comic act director for Cirque du Soleil has taken up residence in the Coronet Theater (home of Largo)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Danny DeVito and Judd Hirsch blow into a downtown steakhouse like a comedy hurricane. They've arrived straight from rehearsal for their upcoming show, "The Sunshine Boys," at the Ahmanson Theatre, and the tone of their entrance shtick owes something to the rapid-fire joking favored by the vaudeville comedians they play in the show. Hirsch is tall and thin with a full head of mussed salt-and-pepper hair. DeVito is short and round and sports a Friar Tuck-like ring of longish white hair.
TRAVEL
July 20, 1997
I enjoyed Eileen Ogintz's story about the rebirth of Times Square ("Now G-Rated, New York City's Times Square Is Family-Friendly," July 6). However, I must take exception to her statement that a hundred years ago, families came to Times Square to see vaudeville. I am sure that they did, but the inference is that it has been a hundred years since vaudeville flourished there. In June 1934, I played at Loew's State Theater (45th Street and Broadway), and in August of that same year, I played "The Palace" at 47th Street and Broadway, both in the heart of Times Square, in the vaudeville act known as "Larry Rich & Co.," and my father isn't even 100 years old!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vaudeville. The word itself has an archaic feeling, a reference to musty old theaters and outdated forms of entertainment. But vaudeville, in its heyday during the early half of the 20th century, was a virtually all-inclusive entertainment form. Encompassing music, dance, theater and comedy, along with whistlers, plate-spinners, contortionists and every imaginable form of public expression, it was a primary source of pre-radio, pre-movies and pre-television amusement.
NEWS
July 8, 1990
Anthony A. Tedeschi, a vaudeville and Broadway violinist who last played for the musical "Fiddler on the Roof," has died. He was 88. Tedeschi died Wednesday in Los Angeles of undisclosed causes. A native of Naples, Italy, Tedeschi immigrated to the United States with his family when he was 4 and began studying violin at age 6. During his long career, he performed with such stars as Fanny Brice, Fred Astaire, the Andrews Sisters, and the Marx Brothers.
NEWS
July 25, 1987
Requiem Mass was celebrated Thursday at Holy Family Catholic Church in Glendale for Velma Connor, who performed in vaudeville with her late twin sister, Thelma, and then went on to a film career in the early 1930s. She was 82. Velma Connor died on Sunday at Kaiser-Permanente Medical Center in Hollywood, where she was receiving treatment for heart and circulatory problems. Her sister died in 1981. The Connor Twins began on the stage with Gus Edwards in 1921, then appeared in The Ziegfeld Follies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2008 | AL MARTINEZ
We were lunching at Musso & Frank's, which is a glorious old restaurant on Hollywood Boulevard once filled with luminaries from the worlds of literature and cinema, but almost empty on this particular day. The place was opened in 1919 by John Musso and Frank Toulet, and its mixologist became famous creating perfect martinis for the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and Rudolph Valentino, to name a few. My guess is that the current parade...
BOOKS
October 16, 1994
I am doing research for a writing project on the life and work of the late Ray Bolger. Seeking personal anecdotes, and photographs, memories covering anything from vaudeville and OZ to CBS, Ballanchine, and Broadway experiences. I would appreciate hearing from anyone who knew him or worked with him. VICTORIA SHAW, 111 CHESTER AVENUE, FAIRFAX, CA. 94930
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
With its emphasis on music and games over tedious, pre-scripted interviews, "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" is in many ways the freshest show of the late-night genre. But on Thursday night Fallon and a gang of fellow funnymen, including Billy Crystal and surprise guest Jerry Seinfeld, served up a new version of the classic Abbott & Costello routine "Who's on First?" about a team of peculiarly named baseball players. When it comes to comedy, it doesn't get much more old-fashioned than "Who's on First?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The Palace Theatre is indeed a place fit for royalty. Massive murals lord over the auditorium. Cornucopia moldings hang over the exits. And frescos cover the theater's domed ceiling, a homage to an era when going to a show was truly a glamorous affair. "It's pretty incredible, isn't it?" David Linderman said as he sat in one of its plush seats. "It's more of a palace than a theater. " Linderman drove in from Moorpark with his wife for a public tour Saturday by the Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation, which surveyed every nook of the theater, which had its first performance on June 26, 1911.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2012
Wheeler and Woolsey Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey re-created their comedic Broadway roles for the 1929 film version of "Rio Rita" and became one of the most successful teams until Woolsey's death in 1938. The Ritz Brothers Al, Jimmy and Harry were a vaudeville comedy-dancing team who starred in such films as "Life Begins in College" and "The Three Musketeers. " Ted Healy and His Stooges Moe, Shemp and Larry were part of the vaudeville team with Healy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Hired by Walt Disney in 1956, Betty Taylor spent three decades portraying the singing saloon hostess and onstage sweetheart of another character, Pecos Bill, at Disneyland's Golden Horseshoe Revue. Taylor died Saturday at a nursing home in Coupeville, Wash., one day after the death of Wally Boag , who starred alongside her as Pecos Bill for more than 25 years. She was 91. Her death was confirmed by her sister, Dorothy Fields, who is her only immediate survivor. "Betty's role as leading lady" helped turn the revue "into the longest-running stage show in entertainment history," George A. Kalogridis, president of Disneyland Resort, said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2011 | By Susan King
The grand Pantages Theater began its storied life as an Art Deco movie palace on June 4, 1930. Originally, the theater designed by B. Marcus Priteca and built by vaudeville giant Alexander Pantages presented vaudeville acts between screenings of first-run movies. Pantages sold the theater to Fox West Coast Theaters in 1932, and 17 years later Howard Hughes ? who, legend has it, haunts its offices ? bought it for his RKO Theatre Circuit. The theater was also home to the Academy Awards from 1949 to 1959.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2011
UCLA Film and Television Archive rings in 2011 with its monthlong "Mixed Nuts: Vaudeville in Film" series. It pays homage to the comedic greats who hailed from vaudeville and found success in early talkies such as Jimmy Durante, W.C. Fields, Eddie Cantor, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Wheeler and Woolsey, and Charlotte Greenwood. The fun opens Friday at the Billy Wilder Theatre with the 1934 oddball musical comedy "Hollywood Party," featuring Durante, Laurel & Hardy and, yes, Mickey Mouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2012
Wheeler and Woolsey Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey re-created their comedic Broadway roles for the 1929 film version of "Rio Rita" and became one of the most successful teams until Woolsey's death in 1938. The Ritz Brothers Al, Jimmy and Harry were a vaudeville comedy-dancing team who starred in such films as "Life Begins in College" and "The Three Musketeers. " Ted Healy and His Stooges Moe, Shemp and Larry were part of the vaudeville team with Healy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2011 | By Susan King
The grand Pantages Theater began its storied life as an Art Deco movie palace on June 4, 1930. Originally, the theater designed by B. Marcus Priteca and built by vaudeville giant Alexander Pantages presented vaudeville acts between screenings of first-run movies. Pantages sold the theater to Fox West Coast Theaters in 1932, and 17 years later Howard Hughes ? who, legend has it, haunts its offices ? bought it for his RKO Theatre Circuit. The theater was also home to the Academy Awards from 1949 to 1959.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | Deborah Vankin
Do you know Neil Hamburger? I think he's very funny. He writes such cutting jokes. I'm a fan of characters and I like things that are a little beyond reality. I like a little razzle-dazzle. Have you ever seen him? He's this guy named Gregg Turkington, who's this cool hipster guy who plays this old vaudeville kind of salty, greasy [guy] ? he wears a suit and tells these one-liners, as people usually boo or are confused. He has a show at Spaceland once a month. And he was just on tour with Tim and Eric.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2010 | By Charlie Amter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Hollywood's Roosevelt Hotel has long been synonymous with glamour. The first Oscars were held there at 7000 Hollywood Blvd. in 1929. Marilyn Monroe and Montgomery Clift were residents at the historic hotel in the 1950s. Aspiring rock stars began hanging poolside during the 1990s, and in the last few years bona fide celebrities have again been flocking to the place ? especially since New York-based Thompson Hotels began managing the iconic 300-room property in 2005 ? transforming it into a nightlife anchor for the area.
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