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Vaughn Meader

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Vaughn Meader, who created a national sensation impersonating President Kennedy on the hit 1962 comedy album "The First Family," but saw his career come to a virtual end when Kennedy was assassinated a year later, died Friday. He was 68. Meader, a longtime smoker, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his home in Auburn, Maine, his wife, Sheila, told The Times.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Vaughn Meader, who created a national sensation impersonating President Kennedy on the hit 1962 comedy album "The First Family," but saw his career come to a virtual end when Kennedy was assassinated a year later, died Friday. He was 68. Meader, a longtime smoker, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his home in Auburn, Maine, his wife, Sheila, told The Times.
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NEWS
April 20, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hard part of the day--waking up, staring at TV, waiting for someone to come and visit--is over and Abbott Vaughn Meader is back in his element, at the River Cafe on Water Street, nursing a rum and coke through a straw. Although he tries never to peak too early, he is indeed, at 5 in the afternoon, in danger of doing just that; his words shouted, the jokes rolling slurred and fast off his tongue, his eyes dancing with mischief.
NEWS
April 20, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hard part of the day--waking up, staring at TV, waiting for someone to come and visit--is over and Abbott Vaughn Meader is back in his element, at the River Cafe on Water Street, nursing a rum and coke through a straw. Although he tries never to peak too early, he is indeed, at 5 in the afternoon, in danger of doing just that; his words shouted, the jokes rolling slurred and fast off his tongue, his eyes dancing with mischief.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2011
Only one solo artist born in Mexico has ever been nominated in one of the three main performance categories: Carlos Santana. (Side note: Herb Alpert's original band, Tijuana Brass, contained no Tijuanans.) Five acts who have never won a major performance Grammy: Bob Marley, Diana Ross, Neil Young, Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead. Only two comedians have ever won a major performance award: Bob Newhart (best new artist, 1961) and Vaughn Meader (album of the year, "The First Family," 1963)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1987
Frank Sinatra and Stevie Wonder lead the list of Grammy album-of-the-year winners, finishing first in the balloting a remarkable three times each in the 28-year history of the awards. Paul Simon (once as a solo artist and once as part of Simon & Garfunkel) and John Lennon (once with the Beatles and once with Yoko Ono) are the only other artists to win more than once. The winners: 1958--"The Music From Peter Gunn," Henry Mancini. 1959--"Come Dance With Me," Frank Sinatra.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | FRANK RIZZO, HARTFORD COURANT
Jim Morris was terrified. In 1988, George Bush was elected President, succeeding Morris' endless supplier of comic material, Ronald Reagan. Would Morris become a lame-duck comedian-impersonator and go the way of Kennedy mimic Vaughn Meader and Nixon's comic embodiment, David Frye? Not to worry. The quintessential impersonator of Reagan as dithering Dad quickly metamorphosed into a whining, WASP-ish Bush.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1988 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
Rock deejays tend to show more interest in Run DMC than in Ronald Reagan, so the upcoming Moscow summit is the last thing that commuters might have expected to hear about on morning drivetime radio this week. But if they happened to punch up KLSX-FM's (97.1) Phil Hendrie, they would have heard "Just Standing Here Watching the White House Grass Grow," a jaded rap exchange between Mikhail Gorbachev and an addled Reagan, droned to the tune of Bob Dylan's "Watching the River Flow."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1992 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
Not everything on laser is a new, improved, added-upon version of a classic or not-so-classic film. Some of the most fascinating moments to come through the television set via laser originated on TV. MGM UA Home Video has recently released collections that capture both the campy and the influential moments of the 1960s, from "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." (Vol. I, four discs, digital sound, $100) to "The Outer Limits" (two volumes, four discs apiece, digital sound, $100 per set).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996 | Steve Hochman
Rock and Roll Hall of Famers Who Never Won a Grammy: the Band, the Beach Boys, Chuck Berry, the Byrds, Sam Cooke, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Cream, the Doors, the Drifters, the Four Tops, the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, the Jackson 5, the Jefferson Airplane, Janis Joplin, Led Zeppelin, Little Richard, Bob Marley, Van Morrison, the Supremes, the Who, Hank Williams Sr., the Velvet Underground.
NEWS
April 11, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kennedys were famous for their games of touch football--a fun pastime that had the added advantage of enhancing the family's image. They all looked so rugged, so sexy, so American. How could anyone not want them to be the nation's first family? Playwright Jim Tosney and composer-lyricist Tom Megan take that ball and run with it, suggesting in their new musical satire, "Jack," that the Kennedys tried to run the country the same way they approached backyard football.
NEWS
August 31, 1992 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The whole idea of being a "travel writer" is strange, really. You travel somewhere, you take notes, you write your book, and then you travel somewhere else. Your observations are authentic--they must be because you have seen them--but they are limited by time and space and your own literary agenda. Who is the audience for these "travel" books? People who have not been, nor will ever go, to the place in question.
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