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Vaughn Walker

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December 5, 1988
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) says he will not support San Francisco attorney Vaughn Walker for the federal bench because of Walker's membership in the all-male Olympian Club. Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.), who has announced his intention to resubmit Walker's name for a U.S. District Court vacancy in San Francisco, said through an aide that Cranston's opposition is likely to kill the nomination. The aide, Linda Royster, said Wilson will try to persuade Cranston to change his mind. She added: "Mr.
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NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By David Lauter, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Same-sex marriages will resume in California in a matter of weeks, lawyers who challenged the state's Proposition 8 said. "Let the marriages begin," attorney Ted Boutros declared to a crowd of supporters gathered on the sidewalk outside the Supreme Court after the justices invalidated the state's same-sex marriage ban. Boutros said state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris will announce the details of the state's plans later Wednesday. The high court's rulings typically take effect within 25 days.
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NEWS
November 26, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
San Francisco attorney Vaughn R. Walker, whose nomination as a U.S. district judge was delayed for two years because of controversy surrounding his membership in a club with a record of discrimination, has won Senate confirmation. Walker was a 15-year member in the Olympic Club of San Francisco, which had no black members until last year and still excludes women. He resigned Feb. 15, but critics said the move came too late and questioned his claim to have opposed the exclusion of women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Vaughn R. Walker, the San Francisco judge who issued the first ruling on the federal constitutionality of Proposition 8, said Wednesday that he believes the trial he presided over affected the outcome of the same-sex marriage cases decided by the Supreme Court. “Subliminally, yes,”  he said in an interview. Now retired from the bench and working as a private mediator, Walker, 69, was expected to play a minor role in the battle over gay marriage. But his 2010 decision overturning Proposition 8 was all that remained Wednesday after the Supreme Court ruled  that opponents of gay marriage had no legal right to appeal it. State officials refused to do so. Walker's court was supposed to be a pit stop on the way to the Supreme Court.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By David Lauter, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Same-sex marriages will resume in California in a matter of weeks, lawyers who challenged the state's Proposition 8 said. "Let the marriages begin," attorney Ted Boutros declared to a crowd of supporters gathered on the sidewalk outside the Supreme Court after the justices invalidated the state's same-sex marriage ban. Boutros said state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris will announce the details of the state's plans later Wednesday. The high court's rulings typically take effect within 25 days.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday nominated the chief federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, Robert C. Bonner, to a federal district court seat and, in a move likely to spark a political battle, picked a San Francisco lawyer strongly opposed by gay rights activists for a federal judgeship in Northern California. In the case of Bonner and San Francisco attorney Vaughn R. Walker, Bush is resubmitting Reagan Administration nominations that expired last fall in election-year logjams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2010 | Staff reports
Excerpts from the federal court ruling striking down Proposition 8, the voter-approved initiative that banned gay marriage in California. Judge Vaughn R. Walker's conclusion: "Proposition 8 fails to advance any rational basis in singling out gay men and lesbians for denial of a marriage license. Indeed, the evidence shows Proposition 8 does nothing more than enshrine in the California Constitution the notion that opposite sex couples are superior to same-sex couples.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Retired U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker, whose ruling on Proposition 8 led to Tuesday's U.S. Supreme Court hearing,  presided over the first federal trial  on same-sex marriage. The tall, lanky, white-haired former judge is now in private practice in San Francisco doing mediation and private judging. Walker, 69,  retired in February 2011. He was busy mediating a business dispute Tuesday morning but was going to listen to a recording of the arguments and read a transcript later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Vaughn R. Walker, the San Francisco judge who issued the first ruling on the federal constitutionality of Proposition 8, said Wednesday that he believes the trial he presided over affected the outcome of the same-sex marriage cases decided by the Supreme Court. “Subliminally, yes,”  he said in an interview. Now retired from the bench and working as a private mediator, Walker, 69, was expected to play a minor role in the battle over gay marriage. But his 2010 decision overturning Proposition 8 was all that remained Wednesday after the Supreme Court ruled  that opponents of gay marriage had no legal right to appeal it. State officials refused to do so. Walker's court was supposed to be a pit stop on the way to the Supreme Court.
OPINION
September 2, 2010 | By Arturo J. González
I write on behalf of the Bar Assn. of San Francisco, a legal professional membership organization with 8,000 members that works to elevate the standards of integrity, honor and respect in the practice of law. I disagree with Times Assistant Managing Editor David Lauter's claim that the sexual orientation of Northern District of California Chief Judge Vaughn Walker is relevant to the paper's reporting on the federal Proposition 8 case Walker...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Retired U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker, whose ruling on Proposition 8 led to Tuesday's U.S. Supreme Court hearing,  presided over the first federal trial  on same-sex marriage. The tall, lanky, white-haired former judge is now in private practice in San Francisco doing mediation and private judging. Walker, 69,  retired in February 2011. He was busy mediating a business dispute Tuesday morning but was going to listen to a recording of the arguments and read a transcript later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco -- A federal judge's refusal Tuesday to invalidate last year's ruling against Proposition 8 established for the first time that gay judges may decide gay rights cases without having to defend their impartiality. U.S. District Chief Judge James Ware ruled that retired Judge Vaughn R. Walker, 67, who is openly gay, was not required to remove himself from the same-sex marriage case because he has a long-term partner. "It is not reasonable to presume that a judge is incapable of making an impartial decision about the constitutionality of a law, solely because, as a citizen, the judge could be affected by the proceedings," Ware wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
In another jab at the federal judge who ruled against Proposition 8, sponsors of the gay marriage initiative asked a district court Monday to set aside the ruling on the grounds the judge was in a long-term same-sex relationship that posed a conflict of interest. Attorneys for ProtectMarriage, the group that sponsored the 2008 ballot initiative, said in a legal motion that Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker, who retired from the San Francisco-based district court earlier this year, had a duty to disclose his relationship and step down before deciding whether a ban on same-sex marriage violated the federal Constitution.
OPINION
September 2, 2010 | By Arturo J. González
I write on behalf of the Bar Assn. of San Francisco, a legal professional membership organization with 8,000 members that works to elevate the standards of integrity, honor and respect in the practice of law. I disagree with Times Assistant Managing Editor David Lauter's claim that the sexual orientation of Northern District of California Chief Judge Vaughn Walker is relevant to the paper's reporting on the federal Proposition 8 case Walker...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
In an emergency appeal now before a federal court, the backers of Proposition 8 have asked for a permanent hold on last week's "egregiously selective and one-sided" marriage ruling, contending it flouted the law and ignored the evidence. The request to prevent the resumption of same-sex marriages in California next week is being considered by a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Two of the judges were appointed by Democrats, the other by a Republican. The panel has ordered all arguments to be filed by Monday.
OPINION
August 13, 2010 | By Tim Wildmon
The people of California spoke clearly at the polls in 2008 when they passed an amendment to the state Constitution that defined marriage as a union between one man and one woman. The public debate was held, the media wars were fought, both sides spent millions of dollars and the people voted for Proposition 8 by a margin of 52% to 48%. The people's will carried the day, as it is supposed to — until U.S. District Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker came along. Last week, Walker nullified the votes of 7,001,084 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2010 | By Maura Dolan and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
The federal judge who overturned Proposition 8 Wednesday said the ballot initiative that banned same-sex marriage was based on moral disapproval of gay marriage and ordered the state to stop enforcing the ban. U.S. District Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker, in a 136-page ruling, said California "has no interest in differentiating between same-sex and opposite-sex unions." "The evidence shows conclusively that moral and religious views form the only basis for a belief that same-sex couples are different from opposite-sex couples," Walker wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker was supposed to be a bit player in Perry vs. Schwarzenegger, a federal constitutional challenge of the Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage. Lawyers on both sides of the case viewed his federal courtroom in San Francisco as little more than a launching pad where they would argue fine points of constitutional law before the case moved to the appeals bench and eventually to the Supreme Court. But the iconoclastic U.S. District Court judge had something else in mind: a full-blown nonjury trial to test assumptions about whether gays were inferior parents, whether same-sex marriage hurt straight marriage and whether sexual orientation was changeable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2010 | By Maura Dolan and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
The federal judge who overturned Proposition 8 Wednesday said the ballot initiative that banned same-sex marriage was based on moral disapproval of gay marriage and ordered the state to stop enforcing the ban. U.S. District Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker, in a 136-page ruling, said California "has no interest in differentiating between same-sex and opposite-sex unions." "The evidence shows conclusively that moral and religious views form the only basis for a belief that same-sex couples are different from opposite-sex couples," Walker wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2010 | Staff reports
Excerpts from the federal court ruling striking down Proposition 8, the voter-approved initiative that banned gay marriage in California. Judge Vaughn R. Walker's conclusion: "Proposition 8 fails to advance any rational basis in singling out gay men and lesbians for denial of a marriage license. Indeed, the evidence shows Proposition 8 does nothing more than enshrine in the California Constitution the notion that opposite sex couples are superior to same-sex couples.
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