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Vaxjo Sweden

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October 22, 2007 | Karl Ritter, The Associated Press
When this quiet city in southern Sweden decided in 1996 to wean itself off fossil fuels, most people doubted the ambitious goal would have any effect beyond the town limits. A few melting glaciers later, Vaxjo is attracting a green pilgrimage of politicians, scientists and business leaders from as far afield as the U.S. and North Korea seeking inspiration from a city program that has enabled it to cut carbon dioxide emissions 30% since 1993.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 2007 | Karl Ritter, The Associated Press
When this quiet city in southern Sweden decided in 1996 to wean itself off fossil fuels, most people doubted the ambitious goal would have any effect beyond the town limits. A few melting glaciers later, Vaxjo is attracting a green pilgrimage of politicians, scientists and business leaders from as far afield as the U.S. and North Korea seeking inspiration from a city program that has enabled it to cut carbon dioxide emissions 30% since 1993.
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TRAVEL
January 12, 1986
Just want to compliment Jean Mahlberg for her wonderful article on Vaxjo, Sweden, entitled "Alternative in Sweden" (March 17). I had never been to Sweden at all, but her article was most enticing so we spent part of our time there. Stayed at the OK Motor Motel--the day after we left, Aug. 31, they were going to change the name. It was very nice and most reasonable. Rented a car and drove around to the glass factories--Orrefors, Boda, Kosta, etc. Vaxjo has a beautiful lake to walk around, wonderful shopping, good restaurants.
SPORTS
September 13, 1988
In 1987, it took Ivan Lendl and Mats Wilander 4 hours 47 minutes to complete their championship match in the U.S. Open. This year, it took 4:54. According to Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post, it took Steffi Graf only 4:57 combined to win all four of her Grand Slam finals this year.
SPORTS
April 2, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time to talk tennis dynasty? The notion comes from a lighthearted Pete Sampras, and after a star-spangled weekend there are few Italians who would deny it. "The sun plus two wins-- finito ," happy U.S. Davis Cup captain Tom Gullikson said as blue sky crept back over soggy Sicily. With Sampras leading the way, American all-stars took an unbeatable 3-0 lead over Italy here Saturday to advance to the Davis Cup semifinals against Sweden in September. "We're pretty good," No.
SPORTS
August 28, 1996 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
The black limos were parked at the curb and the floral arrangements were in place beside the casket, but suddenly, the old guy began to sputter and wheeze. Cancel the wake. Stefan Edberg is alive and well. Those who follow the U.S. Open tennis tournament, and especially those who broadcast and write about it, had Edberg dead and gone the moment the draw was completed last Thursday.
SPORTS
March 4, 1992 | DAVE McKIBBEN
After nearly getting himself in trouble at last year's NAIA golf championships by making outlandish statements, Mike Wydra probably should have learned his lesson, one might think. Wydra, UC San Diego's golf coach, told anybody who would listen that his team would finish in the top five at the nationals and break 300. He said this with his team mired in eighth place after two rounds, having shot 308 and 321. Somehow, the Tritons finished fourth after shooting 298 and 301 the final two days.
SPORTS
December 15, 1989 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was snowing last weekend in Vaxjo, Sweden, where Stefan Edberg stopped to practice; and it was raining in Stuttgart, West Germany, when he got there this week. Storms, lightning and thunder? As usual, they accompany an introduction to Boris Becker. One of the most prestigious events in tennis begins today in Becker's back yard, where, in perhaps this sport's ultimate twist, money is not the object.
SPORTS
April 1, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunny Sicily turned distinctly swampy Friday, but the U.S. Davis Cup hopes prospered in the cold rain, riding high on the sodden racket of Andre Agassi. No. 2 tried harder. Now it's up to No. 1. Playing on gooey clay and dressed like a skateboarder, Agassi, ranked No. 2 in the world, dispatched Italian Andrea Gaudenzi, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1. The victory gave the heavily favored United States a 1-0 lead in the quarterfinals, which will be completed today and Sunday.
SPORTS
September 3, 1986 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
The man they call "The Killer of Swedes" did in another one Tuesday at the U.S. Open. Miloslav Mecir of Czechoslovakia beat second-seeded Mats Wilander of Vaxjo, Sweden, 6-7, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4 in the fourth round of the men's singles at the National Tennis Center at Flushing Meadow. The win by the No. 16 seed was another in a series of upsets here that were not as startling as the rankings' difference might suggest. It shouldn't have come as a surprise.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | DAVID NELSON
An international guest list headed by Swedish Prince Sigvard Bernadotte Af Wisborg and Princess Marianne filled St. Paul's Cathedral on Saturday for a traditional nuptial Mass that united Kelly Karon Luce and New York maritime attorney Lars Forsberg. The ambassadorial rank formerly held by both the couple's fathers accounted for the generous sprinkling of aristocratic and diplomatic titles among the attendance of 600.
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