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HEALTH
May 3, 2010
As a still-practicing obstetrician of over 30 years, I extend kudos to your freelance writer Taffy Brodesser-Akner for her wonderful first-person piece "The Birth of a Dilemma [April 26]. She did a great job of presenting VBAC (vaginal birth after C-section) from both a practical and emotional standpoint. Unfortunately, with no tort reform coming soon, many hospitals are reluctant to allow VBACs to even occur within their delivery suites. Money talks! Michael L. Friedman, MD., FACOG Torrance • Surely, attempting a vaginal birth after cesarean comes with its risks, but so does vaginal birth with no prior history of cesarean.
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NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Kate Hudson and Victoria Beckham both gave birth this weekend -- Hudson to a second son and Beckham to the first daughter after three boys. Beckham had been scheduled for a C-section days before, and both women had given birth by cesarean in the past. Indeed, the former Spice Girl was thought to be one of the many actresses, singers and other stars who are sometimes called "too posh to push. " Nonetheless, there's just as notable a trend among celebrities to give birth au natural -- even at home -- as did a host of well-known women, including Meryl Streep and Pamela Anderson.
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HEALTH
April 26, 2010 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In my first pregnancy 21/2 years ago, I was induced at 39 weeks, labored for 29 hours, and ended up with an emergency C-section when I failed to make any progress toward actually giving birth. Since then, I have paid close attention to the vaginal-birth-after-C-section debate because I knew the day would come when I would have to. One week into this pregnancy's third trimester, I am still unsure how to approach my delivery. In March, a National Institutes of Health panel questioned the trend of hospitals and doctors denying women who have had a C-section the chance to try for a vaginal delivery.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
Cesarean deliveries have doubled since 1996 and now account for one-third of all births in the United States. A new study suggests that a big dose of patience on the part of women and their healthcare providers during delivery might help to lower the rate substantially. The study, released Monday by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , found C-section rates were twice as high after induction of labor compared with women undergoing spontaneous labor.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Kate Hudson and Victoria Beckham both gave birth this weekend -- Hudson to a second son and Beckham to the first daughter after three boys. Beckham had been scheduled for a C-section days before, and both women had given birth by cesarean in the past. Indeed, the former Spice Girl was thought to be one of the many actresses, singers and other stars who are sometimes called "too posh to push. " Nonetheless, there's just as notable a trend among celebrities to give birth au natural -- even at home -- as did a host of well-known women, including Meryl Streep and Pamela Anderson.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2010 | By Shari Roan
Vaginal birth after caesarean, or VBAC, is reasonably safe and should be more widely available, a National Institutes of Health advisory panel concluded Wednesday. Such deliveries once accounted for 25% of U.S. births among women with a previous caesarean delivery, but have now fallen to less than 9%. Many women would like to attempt a vaginal delivery, however, and the panel's consensus statement is expected to increase their access to the option. The panel, composed of independent experts in maternal and child health, found that although both VBAC and planned, repeat caesareans posed a range of risks and benefits, women should be allowed more choice.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The major medical organization representing obstetricians said Wednesday that a vaginal birth after caesarean is a safe and appropriate choice for most women who have had a prior C-section, including some women who have had two prior C-sections. The guidelines were issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Hospital policies, legal concerns, insurance restrictions and factors related to doctor and patient convenience often prevent women who could have a VBAC from getting one. "Moving forward, we need to work collaboratively with our patients and our colleagues, hospitals and insurers to swing the pendulum back to fewer caesareans and a more reasonable VBAC rate," Dr. Richard N. Waldman, president of ACOG, said in a news release.
HEALTH
February 19, 2001
I read "Once a C-Section Always a C-Section? Yes, Insist Many Experts" (Feb. 5) with great interest, because my first child (a 6-pound, 10-ounce breech baby) was born by caesarean section, and the last two (both 8 pounds, 5 ounces) were born vaginally. My C-section was extremely painful because I wasn't given enough anesthesia, and I could feel every stitch as I was sewn up. I never wanted to go through that much pain ever again. My obstetrician was neutral when I expressed I wanted to try a VBAC.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
Cesarean deliveries have doubled since 1996 and now account for one-third of all births in the United States. A new study suggests that a big dose of patience on the part of women and their healthcare providers during delivery might help to lower the rate substantially. The study, released Monday by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , found C-section rates were twice as high after induction of labor compared with women undergoing spontaneous labor.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | LISA LEVITT RYCKMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Esther Zorn 10 years ago took a lonely journey from the familiar landscape of medical technology to the uncertain terrain of trust in her own body. She had a VBAC--a vaginal-birth-after-Cesarean. And it changed the course of her life. "I felt, after I had given birth to my daughter, that I had regained the blueprint for birthing that I could now pass on," said Zorn, whose own birth in 1952 was by Cesarean delivery. "It was a feeling that I had regained something I had lost, way back."
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The major medical organization representing obstetricians said Wednesday that a vaginal birth after caesarean is a safe and appropriate choice for most women who have had a prior C-section, including some women who have had two prior C-sections. The guidelines were issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Hospital policies, legal concerns, insurance restrictions and factors related to doctor and patient convenience often prevent women who could have a VBAC from getting one. "Moving forward, we need to work collaboratively with our patients and our colleagues, hospitals and insurers to swing the pendulum back to fewer caesareans and a more reasonable VBAC rate," Dr. Richard N. Waldman, president of ACOG, said in a news release.
HEALTH
May 3, 2010
As a still-practicing obstetrician of over 30 years, I extend kudos to your freelance writer Taffy Brodesser-Akner for her wonderful first-person piece "The Birth of a Dilemma [April 26]. She did a great job of presenting VBAC (vaginal birth after C-section) from both a practical and emotional standpoint. Unfortunately, with no tort reform coming soon, many hospitals are reluctant to allow VBACs to even occur within their delivery suites. Money talks! Michael L. Friedman, MD., FACOG Torrance • Surely, attempting a vaginal birth after cesarean comes with its risks, but so does vaginal birth with no prior history of cesarean.
HEALTH
April 26, 2010 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In my first pregnancy 21/2 years ago, I was induced at 39 weeks, labored for 29 hours, and ended up with an emergency C-section when I failed to make any progress toward actually giving birth. Since then, I have paid close attention to the vaginal-birth-after-C-section debate because I knew the day would come when I would have to. One week into this pregnancy's third trimester, I am still unsure how to approach my delivery. In March, a National Institutes of Health panel questioned the trend of hospitals and doctors denying women who have had a C-section the chance to try for a vaginal delivery.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2010 | By Shari Roan
Vaginal birth after caesarean, or VBAC, is reasonably safe and should be more widely available, a National Institutes of Health advisory panel concluded Wednesday. Such deliveries once accounted for 25% of U.S. births among women with a previous caesarean delivery, but have now fallen to less than 9%. Many women would like to attempt a vaginal delivery, however, and the panel's consensus statement is expected to increase their access to the option. The panel, composed of independent experts in maternal and child health, found that although both VBAC and planned, repeat caesareans posed a range of risks and benefits, women should be allowed more choice.
HEALTH
February 19, 2001
I read "Once a C-Section Always a C-Section? Yes, Insist Many Experts" (Feb. 5) with great interest, because my first child (a 6-pound, 10-ounce breech baby) was born by caesarean section, and the last two (both 8 pounds, 5 ounces) were born vaginally. My C-section was extremely painful because I wasn't given enough anesthesia, and I could feel every stitch as I was sewn up. I never wanted to go through that much pain ever again. My obstetrician was neutral when I expressed I wanted to try a VBAC.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | LISA LEVITT RYCKMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Esther Zorn 10 years ago took a lonely journey from the familiar landscape of medical technology to the uncertain terrain of trust in her own body. She had a VBAC--a vaginal-birth-after-Cesarean. And it changed the course of her life. "I felt, after I had given birth to my daughter, that I had regained the blueprint for birthing that I could now pass on," said Zorn, whose own birth in 1952 was by Cesarean delivery. "It was a feeling that I had regained something I had lost, way back."
HEALTH
February 5, 2001 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Because of the serious risk involved in delivering a child vaginally after a caesarean section, many hospitals have guidelines governing the procedure. But their strict rules may be endangering lives. Denied a vaginal delivery at a hospital, many women are opting for home births, say doctors and childbirth educators.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women who have had a caesarean section often want to deliver their next child vaginally--and many are physically capable of doing so. But across the nation, they're increasingly denied that option. Vaginal birth after caesarean--known as VBAC--a childbirth practice heralded only a few years ago as a way to spare women from another surgery, has fallen so far out of favor that women now say they have to fight for it. This year, hospitals in upstate New York; central Ohio; Spokane, Wash.
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